Calgarians: Where is your happy place?

Guest Blog: John Lewis, Intelligent Futures, a Calgary-based firm focusing on urbanism, sustainability and community engagement. 

What if we looked at our city from a perspective of what makes us happy?

Most of the time, discussion about the evolution of Calgary is focused on the negative and the controversial. While this kind of debate and dialogue is essential in a democracy, we also think it’s important to reflect on what is working well.

That’s why we created the #happyyc project.

We initiated #happyyc to find out what places make Calgarians happy. We think that by understanding the places that people love, planners, designers, architects, citizens and community organizations alike can help make more happy happen. For the last few months, we have been out on the streets of Calgary and online looking to find out what places make Calgarians happy. 

The idea of taking happiness seriously has been gaining traction in a number of fields – from Alberta economist Mark Aneilski’s book The Economics of Happiness to psychologist Martin Seligman’s work on authentic happiness to the Bhutan’s measurement of Gross National Happiness. At their core, all these examples are focused on what really matters to people and how to structure systems to enable these good things to occur. In the realm of cities, Charles Montgomery recently wrote Happy City, which investigates the linkages between urban design and happiness.

We wanted to take a look at our own city and hear from Calgarians about what places matter most to them. Using a simplified map and a single direction (“Map the spaces that are your happiest places!”) citizens are able to express the places that make them happy. We’re intentionally leaving it open – we’re not restricting the kinds of places that people can choose.

Could your happy place be window licking and dancing in the sidewalk ballet of one of Calgary's many animated streetscapes? 

Could your happy place be along the 700+ km of pathways?

Could it be Fish Creek Park or the new Greenway?

Could your happy place be one of our live music or theatre spaces?

What we’ve seen so far is both fascinating and beautiful. Natural spaces like the rivers, Nose Hill and the pathways are definitely treasured by our participants so far. And before we go into the in-depth analysis of responses, one thing is clear: Calgarians love to eat. The city’s eating establishments are very well represented. Neighbourhoods like Kensington and Inglewood are showing up very often as well.

We want to hear from YOU!

But we’re not done yet. We want to hear from as many Calgarians as possible – ideally, from at least one person in each of our communities across the city. Until October 1, we’re going to keep asking Calgarians to map their happy places. Once all the maps are in, we’ll analyze the responses and share the results with the community. This will give us all some great insights about the places in our city that matter most to us, along with some clues about the commonalities between them.

Perhaps you like shopping? Maybe you love our historic districts - Stephen Avenue and Inglewood?

Perhaps you have a secret spot in your community?

Could the local playground be your happy place?

Maybe you love one of our 5,000+ parks? Dog park? 

To share your thoughts, go to the HappyYYC and follow the three easy steps.

The more responses, the more insights we’ll all gain.

Step 1: Download and print a map by clicking here.

Step 2: Get our your pencils, pens, markers and/or crayons and map your happiest places.

Step 3: Send your map to the #happyyc project.

  • Option A: Mail it to us at: #happyyc  1221B Kensington Rd NW   Calgary AB   T2N 3P8
  • Option B: Scanning and emailing it to us at: info@happyyc.ca
  • Option C: Uploading it to our site by clicking here
hyyc_map[5].jpg
  If you aren't a Calgarians, I still love to know where is your happy place. Just email me your happy place and perhaps a photo and I will add them to this post.  

If you aren't a Calgarians, I still love to know where is your happy place. Just email me your happy place and perhaps a photo and I will add them to this post. 

Exploring Phoenix Without A Car!

Richard White, June 20, 2014

One of the things that has discouraged us from visiting Phoenix is that we thought you had to have a car to explore the city.  First off, we are thrifty so adding hundreds of dollars per week to a vacation is something we avoid. Second, we love to walk and take transit when we travel as it allows us to to see more and experience the city more like a local. (Blog: Everyday Tourist Transit Tales)

But our recent stay at the Red Lion Inn and Suites in Tempe (RLIST) proved us wrong - in fact you don’t need a car to explore Phoenix’s many attractions.  “How could that be you ask?” 

Red Lion provides an airport shuttle service that will pick you up at the airport and take you back.  And, while you are staying there, two vans are available to take guests to anywhere within a five-mile radius. What a great amenity!

Five Mile Zone

Within the five-mile zone of RLIST, you can get dropped off and picked up at the following places:

  • Arizona State University campus (a great place to explore and during football season, you have easy access to college football games.
  • ASU Karsten, Pagao, Rolling Hills, Rio and Coronade golf courses
  • Old Town Scottsdale (where you can shop ‘til you drop).
  • Desert Botanical Gardens, Phoenix Zoo, Tempe Beach Park
  • Tempe Marketplace and Tempe Mill Avenue District
  • Gammage Memorial Auditorium, the last commission of Frank Lloyd Wright.  
  • Downtown Tempe where you can catch the LRT train to downtown Phoenix giving you access to baseball and basketball games and the Science Center. Or, stay on the train to Phoenix Art Museum, Heard Art Museum (great gift shop and restaurant) and the hipster Melrose district.
  • During spring training you can get dropped off at the Cubs’ Hohokam Stadium in Mesa, the A’s Phoenix Municipal Stadium and the Giant’s Scottsdale Stadium.
  • Popular festivals include: Arizona Renaissance Festival, Great Arizona Beer Festival, Scottsdale Culinary Festival and Tempe Festival of the Arts. 
  Riding the LRT to downtown with the students and cyclists was a much more urban experience than we had anticipated. 

Riding the LRT to downtown with the students and cyclists was a much more urban experience than we had anticipated. 

Phoenix's downtown wayfinding sign lists many attractions. 

Theatre/Performing Arts Centre 

Heard Museum's lovely patio restaurant. 

Modern On Melrose is just one of several antique and second hand stores that make for a fun place to explore.

Papago Golf Course is just minutes away from RLIST. 

"Her Secret is Patience" by Janet Echelman is just one of many public artworks in the downtown. 

Exploring the Desert Botanical Garden was one of the highlights of our visit. 

ArtWalk in Old Town Scottsdale is a 30-year tradition.  Dozens of galleries open their doors to locals and tourists to browse the galleries every Thursday from 7 to 9 pm.  Old Town is several blocks of restaurants, bars, shops and galleries.  Not far way there is Scottsdale Fashion Square a two million square foot mega luxury shopping centre with flagships stores like - Barneys New York, Neiman Marcus, Nordstroms, Microsoft and Banana Republic concept store. 

Extended Stays

RLIST in its former life was an apartment complex, making the suites more like comfortable, and one-bedroom apartments. With Food City within walking distance, you can easily walk to shop for ingredients to make dinner or lunch. (Note: the hotel provides a complimentary hearty breakfast).

The lobby, with its soft seating has a café-like atmosphere for those who want to read or take their laptop to do some work or surf the net.

The Inn also has an attractive outdoor pool area if you want to relax poolside or enjoy a refreshing swim. There’s even BBQs so you can grill up your favourite food to enjoy poolside just like home.

And for golfers who want to work on their putting, they have a carpeted putting green.

RLIST's very functional living room, kitchen, bedroom layout. (Photo credit: Red Lion) 

Large bedroom with space for chair and desk. (Photo credit: Red Lion).

Your own private putting green....12+ on the stimpmeter. 

Footnotes

 If you need a car for a day or two to travel further afield, the shuttle can also drop you off at several car rental offices within the five-mile zone. We’d recommend checking out the Frank Lloyd Wright campus and the Musical Instruments Museum if you decide to rent a car.

The advantage of the RLIST shuttle for couples is that you can go off in different directions in the morning and meet up later for your own poolside Happy Hour chat to share stories.  

We are definitely rethinking Phoenix as a potential winter getaway next year.

P.S.  If you do have a car, RLIST has great free parking that makes it easy to drive to some activities and take the shuttle to others (perhaps you want to enjoy an adult beverage or two). 

If you like this blog, you might like:

Postcards: Musical Instruments Museum 

Frank Lloyd Wright Taliesen West: A must see

Melrose: Phoenix's emerging vintage district

Downtown Salt Lake City: More Than A Temple!

By Richard White, March 22, 2014

Flaneuring downtown Salt Lake City (SLC) was easy from our south downtown Red Lion Hotel. It provided easy access to all downtown attractions including the Central Library and the Leonardo (creativity centre), Temple Square, City Creek Centre and The Gateway Mall.  And of course, you are inside the free fare zone so all transit (buses and trains) are free – how good is that.

As good flaneurs, we headed out each day without much of a plan. One day we just ended up at the Joseph Smith Memorial Building’s Family Search Centre (and decided to check out my father's family tree), the Lion’s Pantry Restaurant, City Creek Centre (with a real creek running through it), Museum of Contemporary Art, Harmons grocery and Broadway Street merchants (vintage furniture, art books and rare book shops). Another day it was Deseret Thrift store, Temple Square, The Gateway Mall, Olympic Plaza, Capitol Hill and the 9th & 9th corner.

Flaneuring downtown SLC is unique as the blocks are extra long and the sidewalks and roads are extra wide. The traffic lights are so long you can take a quick nap and not miss the light.  Flaneuring is also difficult as there are no streets with contiguous shops; seems like there is something on every corner, but nothing along the way.  Or, you find something mid-block in a residential area where you would never in a million years expect to find a restaurant, cafe or shop. 

However, like all good flaneurs we just enjoyed the many churches and homes along the way. We met wonderful people who helped us with directions and suggestions.  One of the great things that defines SLC is that almost everybody says "Hi" as you walk by.  

Brenda's souvenir find from our street walking in SLC was this 1938 postcard. 

One of the quirkier things we found flaneuring were these orange flags at crosswalks.  It took me a while (Brenda figured it out right away) that you are supposed to grab a flag and wave it as you cross the street and then place it in the holder on the other side.  Given the number of pedestrian / car accidents I have been reading about lately perhaps this is a good idea for all cities.

  The City Creek Centre has an simulated creek running through the shopping centre.  At first I was told this was actual water from the creek that runs through this area, but someone else said that this water is treated.  However, there is a creek along the sidewalk next to the LDS Conference Centre that I am told is water from the actual creek that used to run from the canyon in the mountains to a river on the edge of downtown.

The City Creek Centre has an simulated creek running through the shopping centre.  At first I was told this was actual water from the creek that runs through this area, but someone else said that this water is treated.  However, there is a creek along the sidewalk next to the LDS Conference Centre that I am told is water from the actual creek that used to run from the canyon in the mountains to a river on the edge of downtown.

The LDS Family Search Centre is free and open to everyone.  You get a tutor or coach who will assist you with your search which is invaluable as they know the software and the things to look for.

Brenda is thinking about what to wish for, before adding it to the Yoko Ono "Wish Tree."  It is surprising how difficult it is when you are asked to make a wish, write it down and place in in public place.

Fun Flaneuring Finds beyond the Temple:

  • Even hipsters in SLC wear a tie and suit.  I used to think it was only hotel managers and bankers who wore ties, but in SLC it seems all the men in downtown dress up as if they were going to church.
  • The "brothers" and "sisters" at the Family Search Center are wonderful - so helpful, friendly and patient. No attempt to push their beliefs or propaganda on us. Brother Badger spent three hours helping us find some information on my father’s family ancestry.  He never made a comment about religion and never asked for a donation – in fact there was no donation box in sight. This experience changed my image of the Latter-day Saints' culture.
  • A man-made creek runs through the new City Creek Center fashion mall creating a surreal experience. As you flaneur the space you move from outside to inside, back to outside then inside and back out. I was shocked to find it was a ghost town at noon hour on a cold day in March.
  • Bill is the best! Bill, aka the Chief Visitor Information Officer at the SLC’s Visitor’s Information Centre, is a wealth of knowledge, especially if you are looking for off the beaten path things to see and do.
  • The Ken Saunders Rare Books is a hidden gem with books piled everywhere including the floor.  You could browse here all day and still only have scratched the surface.
  • Yes, the Green Ant vintage store has green ants - actually two. It also has some unique vintage artifacts.  Owner Rod Green has a good eye for vintage and is a great ambassador for the city. We will be forever indebted to him for the hot tip about Em’s restaurant.
  • The Yoko Ono “Wish Tree” at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art was an unexpected hands-on experience. Everyone is invited to make a wish and write it on a small tag with a string for hanging it on the tree. In fact, the entire DO IT exhibition was engaging and thought provoking, exactly what contemporary art should be.
  • Harmons, in the middle of downtown, is huge yet still has a community feel with its loft café where you can chill out at a patio table or lounge on the soft chairs and couches.  It is home away from home.
  • 9th South Delicatessen, in the funky 9OO East and 900 South district, is located in charming house from the 19th century.  We had a great Rueben sandwich and their delicious chicken noodle soup plus some very tasty lemon tarts. But the highlight really was chatting with a local family (mom, grandma and preschoolers) about life in SLC and their family’s proud history as one of the first settlers in the area. The young attractive Mom was pregnant with her 5th child, and while she thought that was enough, one of her tween children thought they should have ten. People in SLC are very friendly; love to say Hi and chat.
  This is the fun 9th South Delicatessen. Painted bright colours and divided up into several rooms it is like walking into a doll house. 

This is the fun 9th South Delicatessen. Painted bright colours and divided up into several rooms it is like walking into a doll house. 

Ken Saunders Rare Books is where the real treasure hunters head. Step step carefully and be patient, but there are treasures to be found.  Brenda found a great 1938 Utah postcard. 

The Green Ant is a funky, quirky vintage store at the front and an art gallery at the back.  It is part of the Broadway bohemian neighbourhood.

Harmons brands itself as "your neighborhood grocer" and we certainly got that feel.  Looking from the loft cafe; this is the main floor as seen from our bistro table where we were enjoying an afternoon coffee and treat.

More Fun, Funky, Quirky Finds

  • Found Eborn Books while taking photos of downtown buildings, art and street furniture. There it was - Utah’s largest used and rare bookstore right on Main Street and I knew nothing about it.  Scored myself a first edition of Walter J. Phillips & Fredrick Niven’s “COLOUR in the CANADIAN ROCKIES.”  
  • We discovered Mod a-go-go after visiting the Cathedral of the Madeleine and wanting to kill some time before a musical rehearsal as to begin.  This part vintage home accessories and furniture and part local art gallery shop is a real find for lovers of mid-century design.
  • We also loved Hatch Family Chocolates and Avenue Proper both located in an old grocery store building off-off the beaten path in the Avenues neighbourhood.  Hatch has great chocolates as you would expect but also homemade ice cream. Avenue Proper is a brew pub (the smallest in Utah) and restaurant.  I drank by through their menu of eight beers as they offered $1 two ounce pours. 

Eborn Books is fun place to bibliophiles to browse.

MOD a-go-go is a great find for those interested in mid-century design.  

Hatch Family Chocolates has lots of tasty treats including these nutty chocolate covered salty pretzels. 

Bonus Flaneur Find

The bonus flaneur find was a recommendation by Rod Green at the Green Ant who suggested we should have dinner at Em’s, located mid-block on Centre Street, a quiet residential street behind Temple Square on Capitol Hill. We took his recommendation and had a great meal, so great we went back again the next night and were very tempted to go back a third night but decided that was ridiculous! Em’s might be the subject of its own blog so I won’t give you any details here other than to say – “if you are ever in SLC, you should go!”

Em's restaurant has a cozy atmosphere, great food and service.  The menu is surprisingly extensive for a small bistro. Don't let the white tablecloths fool you - it is casual and good value. It is fine dining, but won't break the bank.

Last Word

After five days of flaneuring SLC's greater downtown, our take away memory will be that it is more than just the Salt Lake Temple, Temple Square and the entire Temple campus. While it is not yet a Portland or a Calgary as an urban playground, it has lots of urban gems to offer if you are willing to explore.

If you like this blog, you might like: 

Street Walking in Portlandia

Calgary's Rail Trail Stroll

Winnipeg vs Calgary: Urban Hot Spots (part 1)

Thank You!

We would like to thank the Salt Lake City Red Lion Hotel for hosting us for our stay.  We loved our view of the city and the mountains, as well as the wonderful early morning light.

It was a great location to wandering into the downtown or just a quick drive to the major city attractions like the Zoo, Heritage Park and Natural History Museum. I am sure our trip would have been even more enhanced if we had come later in 2014 when the new Aquarium and the Zoo's African area were opened at the Zoo.  




Winnipeg vs Calgary Urban Hot Spots (Part 1)

EDT Note:

Comparing Calgary to other cities is very popular with the readers of my Calgary Herald column. An edited version of this blog was in the Calgary Herald as a two piece column so I have kept the same format.  It should be noted that Brenda grew up in Winnipeg and I lived there for 14 months while I did a MSC in Agriculture at the University of Manitoba.  We hope enjoy our look at Winnipeg vs Calgary (where we have lived the past 30+ years).

Urban Hot Spots

Winnipeg wouldn’t be on too many people’s radar as one of North America’s urban hot spots. In fact, for many years, it has been brunt of cruel jokes like the “We’re going to Winnipeg” punch line from the 2005 Fountain Tire commercial that suggested Winnipeg was the Canadian equivalent of Siberia.  However, that wasn’t always the case. Early in the 20th century it was a boomtown, rivaling Chicago as the major mid-west city in North America and beating out Vancouver as Western Canada’s largest city (it had three times the population of Calgary).

Every city has its heyday.  Calgary shouldn’t get too smug about its current “flavour of the month” city status.  Cities can also rise up from the decay and baggage of their past and I believe Winnipeg is ripe for such a renaissance.  I thought it would be fun to compare Calgary and Winnipeg’s downtowns. The results might surprise you!

The Rivers

Both downtowns are blessed - and cursed - with being situated at the junction of two rivers that provide wonderful recreational opportunities but also are subject to mega flooding.  For both cities, their two rivers have become a focal point of their sense of place and play with major museums, parks, pathways, riverwalks, promenades, plazas and bridges located on or near the rivers. 

While Calgary’s Bow River is considered one of the best fly-fishing rivers in the world and a great place to float, Winnipeg’s Red River is a major catfish river and allows for major motor boating activities.

Winnipeg boast the longest skating rink in the world along their rivers. The colourful "pom poms" called "Nuzzels" are actually warming huts on the Assiniboine River - they add fun, colour, charm and functionality. (Photo credit: Raw Design).

Calgarians love their river also be it floating, paddling, fishing or swimming. 

Advantage: Tied

The Forks vs East Village/Stampede Park

While Calgarians are gaga about the potential of East Village’s mega makeover and Vancouverites’ Granville Island is the envy of the world, Winnipeg has quietly surpassed both of them with the development of The Forks on old railway land on the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers). 

The Forks boasts an upscale boutique hotel, a market, Johnson Terminal (boutiques, café, offices), Children’s Museum, Children’s Theatre, Explore Manitoba Centre, one of North America’s best small baseball parks and the soon-to-be-completed Canadian Museum for Human Rights (arguably Canada’s most iconic new building of the 21st century). Not bad, eh!

Winnipeg's Human Rights Museum will add another dimension to The Forks, one of North America's best urban people places.  

 

An artists rendering of the The National Music Centre at night. The museum is currently under construction. 

The baseball park at The Forks is a very popular place in the summer. 

It also has perhaps the best winter city programming with the world’s longest skating rink (yes, longer than Ottawa’s) in addition to the plaza skating rink, Olympic-size skating rink, 1.2 km of skating trails, snowboard fun park, toboggan run and warming huts designed by the likes of world renowned architect Frank Gehry.  They even have Raw: Almond the world’s first pop-up restaurant on a frozen river featuring the hottest chefs including Calgary’s Teatro.  Take that, Calgary!

Calgary’s East Village, after numerous false starts, is trying very hard to match Winnipeg’s eastside redevelopment with its National Music Centre, new Central Library, Bow Valley College, St. Patrick’s Island Park and bridge as well as Fort Calgary improvements. Stampede Park also has notable attractions with the BMO Centre, Saddledome, new Agrium Western Event Centre and plans for Stampede Trail shopping street, as well as the best festival in Canada i.e. Calgary Stampede.

Advantage: Winnipeg

GMAT Fun (Galleries, Museums, Attractions, Theatres)

Winnipeg’s Manitoba Museum is a large history museum on par with Calgary’s Glenbow from a visitor’s perspective with major permanent and temporary exhibitions.  The Glenbow also functions as our major public art gallery, while Winnipeg boasts one of Canada’s oldest public art galleries, which is located in an iconic contemporary building.

The Winnipeg Art Gallery was one of the first architecture as public art buildings. It The city has a wonderful diversity of old and new architecture. 

Both cities have major new museums with contemporary “weird & wacky” architecture slated to open in the next few years - Winnipeg’s Canadian Museum for Human Rights ($300+ million) and Calgary’s National Music Centre ($130+ million).

Calgary’s major downtown attraction would be the mid-century modern Calgary Tower, while Winnipeg’s would have to be historic Provincial Building with its intriguing Masonic Temple design.

In Winnipeg, the MTS Centre (arena) is a major attraction. While many cities (Edmonton) are building new downtown arenas, Winnipeg has a “Main Street” arena, literally right on Portage Avenue; this would be like the Saddledome being where the Glenbow is on Stephen Avenue. The MTS Centre has placed in the” top 10 busiest arenas in North America” list in the past, regularly selling more tickets to more events than Saddledome. 

The MTS Centre is located right on Portage Avenue aka Main Street Winnipeg.  It is one of the busiest arenas in North America. 

From a performing arts perspective, Winnipeg has its Centennial Concert Hall (home to the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra), the historic 1914 Pantages Playhouse Theatre, Burton Cummings Theatre, Tom Hendry Warehouse Theatre, Rachel Bowne Theatre and Prairie Theatre Exchange.  As well, their Royal Winnipeg Ballet complex is not only located right downtown, but also performs downtown, unlike the Alberta Ballet, which is off-the-beaten track and performs outside the downtown.

Winnipeg is home to three iconic Canadian rock and rollers - Burton Cummings, Randy Bachman and Neil Young. 

Winnipeg though has nothing match our three festival spaces - Prince’s Island Park, Shaw Millennium Park and Olympic Plaza.  And, while Winnipeg has a well-renowned folk festival, it doesn’t happen downtown. Winnipeg’s major festival Folkarama attracts over 400,000 people each year to over 40 ethnic pavilions that are located around the city.  The ‘Peg also boasts the second largest fringe theatre festival in North America (Calgary’s fringe struggle to survive) and their Royal Manitoba Theatre is Canada’s flagship English-language regional theatre company (you can’t just call yourself  “Royal”).

Calgary probably has the more impressive line up of theatres - EPCOR Centre with its five spaces, as well as the Grand, Pumphouse and the two theatres at the Calgary Tower (but rumour has it that the latter spaces will be closed, to accommodate a new office tower).

Calgary boasts the High Performance Rodeo as its only major theatre festival now that playRites is history.  However, downtown Calgary is also home to numerous live music venues including several weekend afternoon jam (WAMJAM) sessions at places like Blues Can, Ironwood, Mikey’s and Ship & Anchor that Winnipeg can’t match. In addition, YYC’s downtown is home Fort Calgary, which is has ambitious plans to become a major attraction.    

  Calgary boasts a very active music scene with numerous venues like Mikey's offering live music seven days a week.  

Calgary boasts a very active music scene with numerous venues like Mikey's offering live music seven days a week. 

Advantage: Tied

SDC Fun (Shopping, Dining, Café)

Winnipeg’s Portage Place doesn’t hold a candle to Calgary’s The Core with its shiny new $200+ million renovation and mega glass roof.  Nor does Winnipeg have the wealth of restaurants that populate Stephen Avenue, 4th Street and 17th Avenue or the mega pubs – CRAFT, National or WEST.

Summer "power hour" (lunch hour) on Stephen Avenue Walk aka Calgary's Main Street. 

Winnipeg's Osborne Village is their bohemian quarters. 

Calgary's Design District offers great restaurants, galleries and design shops. 

Calgary’s downtown restaurants regularly make the in Top 10 List of new Canadian Restaurants by EnRoute Magazine, while Winnipeg’s restaurants have not. A quick check of Vcay’s Top 50 Restaurants in Canada lists eight downtown Calgary restaurants including Charcut Roast House #5 and Model Milk #7 in the top 10.  Winnipeg has only one on the list Deseo Bistro at #36.  This might be due to fact downtown Calgary is home to over 100 corporate headquarters with their healthy “expense account” dining. 

Winnipeg's Exchange District is full of fun, funky and quirky shops. 

Winnipeg boasts one of the most ethnically diverse cultures in North America. 

Both Calgary’s and Winnipeg’s historic Hudson Bay stores are in need of major exterior washing and interior renovations.  Calgary’s Holt Renfrew is definitely in a class of its own when it comes to upscale shopping.

The Hudson Bay Company is the oldest retailer in the world est. 1670, while Winnipeg's store is not that old, it is in need of a major makeover. 

Winnipeg's Portage Place is the hub for downtown shopping as is The Core for downtown Calgary

Calgary's signature Hudson Bay store on Stephen Avenue Walk, a pedestrian mall in the centre of the downtown linking the Financial District with the Cultural District. 

Winnipeg boasts the Stella Café (named after one of the owner’s cat) with its signature Morning Glory muffins in the uber chic Buhler Centre, as well as the unique News Café (owned by the Winnipeg Free Press, it hosts live interviews with Canada’s top newsmakers).   However, Calgary’s café culture has more depth with dozens of local independent cafes with multiple locations throughout the downtown.

The Winnipeg Free Press Cafe is a unique concept that allows for reporters to interview newsmakers and  file stories from their corner offices in the cafe. 

Advantage: Calgary

Intermission:

So far the score is tied. Next week: a look at Winnipeg’s and Calgary’s successes and failures in placemaking, architecture, urban design and downtown living. Also a look at how Calgary's GABEsters differ from Winnipeg's hipsters in what they are looking for with respect to urban living.

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