Winnipeg vs Calgary: The Forks vs East Village

Then it hit me; The Forks isn’t an urban village it is a tourist district. 

Recently I was in Winnipeg for a wedding and had some time to wander their mega urban redevelopment The Forks, which is aptly named as it is located where the Assiniboine and Red Rivers meet in the middle of their City Centre.

As I wandered around at noon hour on a nice Friday in early October I wondered; “Where are the condos? Where are the office buildings? Where are the people running along the river?” 

I couldn’t help but reflect on how the location next to two rivers and just east of downtown was very similar to Calgary’s East Village and yet so different.

The Esplanade Riel Bridge connects The Forks to the community of St. Boniface across the Red River.  It has a restaurant in the middle that offers spectacular views of downtown, the river and the Human Rights Museum. 

  East Village's pathways along the Bow River in St. Patrick's Island Park with the George King bridge in the background.

East Village's pathways along the Bow River in St. Patrick's Island Park with the George King bridge in the background.

Similarities

Both sites were meeting places for First Nations peoples long before the pioneer settlers arrived. 

Both sites are about the same size - The Forks is 63 acres (doesn’t include Shaw baseball park) and East Village is 49 acres (doesn’t include Fort Calgary Park).

Both sites were once industrial sites, with The Forks being an old CN rail yard next to their Union Station, while East Village being more of a light industrial area with a rail line running along its southern edge.

Both sites struggled in the middle of the 20th century to find new uses.  CN Rail moved their yards to the suburbs in 1966 leaving the site vacant.  East Village buildings were torn down in the ‘60s to create ugly overflow surface parking lots for downtown.

Both sites lack good connectivity to downtown and neighbouring communities due to rivers and railway tracks.

Winnipeg's Union Station and railway sheds separate The Forks from downtown. 

Today, both sites are managed by a CEO who reports to a government appointed Board of Directors.  The Forks CEO, Paul Jordan reports to The Forks North Portage Partnership Board which was established by the Federal, Provincial and Municipal governments.  East Village President and CEO, Michael Brown reports to Calgary Municipal Land Corporation Board appointed by City of Calgary. 

Both sites have a major new museum, Human Rights Museum at the Forks and National Music Centre in East Village.  Both of which are only national museums located outside of Ottawa.  The Forks also has a Children’s Museum, Children’s Theatre and skatepark, while East Village has a mega new library and the family oriented St. Patrick’s Island Park.  And each has popular pedestrian pathways, plazas along the river’s edge and an iconic pedestrian bridge over the river. 

Both The Forks and East Village have very active programming to attract people to the site.  The Forks attracts over 4 million visitors to the site and is the City and Province’s number one tourist attraction.

The uniquely shaped Human Rights Museum dominates The Forks. In the foreground is a multi-purpose plaza that can serve as a skatepark, busker/performance space or casual sitting area. 

  East Village's National Music Centre

East Village's National Music Centre

  The Fork's river landing and pathway along the Assiniboine River just before it flows into the Red River. 

The Fork's river landing and pathway along the Assiniboine River just before it flows into the Red River. 

  East Village's Riverwalk with the Langevin bridge, 4th, 5th and LRT flyovers in the background. 

East Village's Riverwalk with the Langevin bridge, 4th, 5th and LRT flyovers in the background. 

The Market at The Forks is part food court (main floor), part retail space (second floor). 

  East Village: The Simmons building has an upscale restaurant, cafe and bakery. 

East Village: The Simmons building has an upscale restaurant, cafe and bakery. 

Winnipeg's Children's Museum is one of several cultural facilities located at The Forks. 

  Computer rendering of the Caglary's new Central Library looking west from East Village.

Computer rendering of the Caglary's new Central Library looking west from East Village.

Differences

The Forks North Portage Partnership purchased all of the land from CN Rail for $66 million, whereas the City of Calgary owned about 50% of the East Village lands at one point. 

  Aerial view of The Forks

Aerial view of The Forks

The Forks has no master plan governing how all of its land will be developed eventually, but rather is governed more organically adapting to new opportunities and needs as they arise.  The first thing CMLC did was create a comprehensive master plan with a detailed 3D video to help everyone understand the vision of the new East Village as a 21st century urban village.

The Forks is actively working with developers to convert 12 acres of surface parking lots next to the railway tracks and Union Station into Railside. The vision calls for $500 million to be invested by large and small developers to build 20+ buildings no taller than six storeys with retail at street level and offices and condos above and $50 million in public spaces. (Railside will be more like Calgary’s University District than East Village in that the land will be leased not owned, as The Forks partnership wants to retain ownership of the land).

  New condos and the East Village sales centre. 

New condos and the East Village sales centre. 

East Village’s development was funded by a Community Revitalization Levy (CRL) that was used to upgrade infrastructure and help build new public amenities like St. Patrick’s Island Park, National Music Museum and new Central Library.  The $357 million CRL has resulted in $2.4 billion in private sector development and is expected to generate $725 million in new tax revenues by 2027, which will more than pay back the $357 million levy. 

The Forks is a unique government led partnership with the return on investment (ROI) being shared by the three parties - City receives new property tax revenue, Province provincial sales tax paid on site and Federal Government getting all GST revenues. 

Like East Village, two of the most popular reason for visiting The Forks are Canada Day festivities and summer concerts.  What is very interesting is the Forks has been very successful in creating winter attractions – skating on the river and the Winter Park are listed as the third and fourth most popular activities in a 2015 Survey and not far behind summer concerts the second most popular activity, festivals being number one.   

East Village hosts an ambitious year-round program of events.

  Winnipeg's ice skating trails

Winnipeg's ice skating trails

Winnipeg’s Winter Wonderland

The Fork’s “Warming Huts” is a stroke of genius.  Since 2009, an international competition has been organized inviting designers to submit proposals for shelters to be installed along the river skating rink so people can stop, chat and warm up.  The program has captured international attention including the New York Times with the Travel Section headline “In Winnipeg, a Skating Rink That Doubles as a Sculpture Park.”

It has also captured the imagination of starchitect Frank Gehry who designed an igloo made of clear blocks of ice in 2012.

Winnipeg Ice Hut

Last Word

East Village is an intriguing example of private public collaboration based on an ambitious vision, master plan and implementation with a 20-year return on investment and build out.   It reflects Calgary’s corporate culture and the love of the mega projects.

After 30 years, The Forks is just now completing the return on investment for the three levels of government and is still decades away from complete build out.  It reflects Winnipeg’s government culture and love of grass roots development.

Paul Jordan and his Board of Directors are happy with The Forks’ slower redevelopment timeline as it allows for organic growth and the ability to respond to community needs over time rather than being locked into a fixed master plan.

I guess you could say there is “more than one way to skin a cat.”

If you like this blog, you will enjoy:

Winnipeg vs Calgary: Urban Hot Spots (Part 1) 

Winnipeg vs Calgary: Urban Hot Spots (Part 2) 

Winnipeg's Old World Charm

 

 

Metrovino: $5 Sherry Festival (More Please)

 

Woke up Monday (Nov 7, 2016) morning came downstairs to find Brenda all excited about a Sherry Festival produced by Richard Harvey at Calgary’s Metrovino the week of November 14th.  Immediately, memories of our first trip to Europe rushed into my still sleepy head.
Calgary Sherry Festival Fun

We were young and naïve. And I was cocky. We had booked a 3-week road trip adventure in Spain and Portugal.  We landed in Lisbon at afternoon rush hour and had to get to Cascais what we thought would be a short, easy drive to our hotel.  Wrong.

It was like driving the Deerfoot with traffic circles thrown in for some fun. (Note: this was the late 80s and I had never seen a traffic circle in my life.)  It was white knuckling all the way.  Backstory: We thought we were going to die at least 3 times in the first 2 days of this trip.  I learned to drive with one foot on the gas and one on the brake.  My motto became that of a running back in football i.e. run (or in this case, driver) for daylight.

Back to Cascais. We arrived to find none of the streets had signage names at the corner and their were few street lights – it was pretty much pitch black by then.  (Note: There was no GPS, or cell phone apps to guide us, just old school paper maps.)  We had to park the car and walk around to try to find where we were i.e. the street names were in ceramic tiles on the buildings, impossible to see from the road. 

Finally, we found our hotel and room to find two twin beds.  That wasn’t going to work for us, (remember we said we were naïve) so back down to the check-in desk to see if we could get a queen bed at least. (Note: We spoke no Portuguese or Spanish).  Yes, we made the twin beds work. 

After 3 days we thought, “what the hell have we done, but after 17 days we didn’t want to go home.” 

Most Embarrassing Moment

Seville is so rich with history and rituals, everyone should visit there at least once in their life. We were so fortunate that just by chance we were there at Easter. 

Perhaps one of the most embarrassing moments of my life happened in Jerez (the sherry capital of the world) while I was filling up our rental car with gas.  As we entered the busy gas station lot I noticed that one of the gas pumps wasn’t being used so I quickly pulled up to it and as former gas jockey, I was quick to jump out and started the fill up. People started looking and waving at me and saying something but not understanding a word they said, I just kept filling it up.

Then someone came over pointed to a word and turned it off.  The light bulb came on – I was filling up the car with diesel fuel and it was not a diesel car.  What to do? Luckily, we found someone who could speak some English who took us to a pub nearby where we phoned the rental car company who towed the car away and got us a new car later that day (all they charged us for was a full tank of gas).  I spent the day feeling stupid and we wasted what was supposed to be a fun day in Jerez tasting sherry.

Backstory: When I was an undergrad at McMaster University (’72 to ’76) I was introduced to sherry by one of my biology professors Dr. Davidson who became my mentor (what one might call a “life coach” these days).  He would host an annual Sherry Party in his condo full of modern art and Persian rugs for graduate students each year. As the President of the undergraduate Biology Club, I got invited and loved the smooth sweet taste of sherry.  My sweet tooth thought I had died and gone to heaven.  I started to volunteer to work in Davidson’s lab in the summers, partly to learn more about biology and the life of a researcher, but also for those 5 o’clock glasses of sherry and lively debates he often hosted in his lab.

  One of our best memories of our trip to Spain were the Easter processions. At first we thought it was the Ku Klux Klan the similarities in the costumes is scary.  

One of our best memories of our trip to Spain were the Easter processions. At first we thought it was the Ku Klux Klan the similarities in the costumes is scary.  

Metrovino

I first met Richard Harvey back in the mid 1980s when he was a partner with Janet Webb who opened one of Calgary’s first wine stores in the then brand new Glenmore Landing Shopping Centre (the Aspen Landing Shopping Centre of the ‘80s).  I used to hang out there every Friday for happy hour enjoying wine and chatting with Richard, Peggy (Peggy Perry the brains behind Willow Park Wine & Spirits), not the and Janet waiting for Brenda to return home from her job in Coaldale.

  Metrovino's Sherry Corner. 

Metrovino's Sherry Corner. 

We will definitely be heading to Metrovino for their Sherry Festival that also included tapas from Ox and Angela, Char-Cut, bar C and the Bar Von Der Fels.  One of my fondest memories was enjoying a tapas dinner in Seville watching the sunset from a patio on the Guadalquivir River and wondering what was Christopher Columbus thinking when he said off from here to find the new world. 

Would going every night and see if we can taste all 27 Sherries that Harvey stocks be too boorish? We did after all, we miss out on a lot of sherry tasting in Jerez. 

I wonder if Harvey has Harvey’s Shooting Sherry, it was one of my favourites.  I think they stopped making it several years ago, maybe he has a bottle in the back. 

  Richard Harvey is a urban flanuer who loves to where a beret. 

Richard Harvey is a urban flanuer who loves to where a beret. 

Last Word

Imagine $5 for sherry tasting, tapas and listening to Harvey’s storytelling.  Too good to be true; maybe I am still asleep and this is a dream. 

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Calgary: Snowman Fun!

You know it is going to be a long winter when you have a white Thanksgiving! 

Yes, Calgary got snow before Thanksgiving this year and it stayed until after the holiday.  It is not usual for Calgary to get snow in October - in fact, it can (and has) snowed in Calgary every month of the year except July - hail season. 

Indeed, Calgary is a winter city, albeit a dry winter city (and I don’t mean “no alcohol” but rather our winter air is dry vs. humid, which means while it might be cold temperature-wise, the cold air doesn’t get absorbed by the skin like humid air does, so it doesn’t feel as cold.  This is true, not an old wives tale).

  This was our second effort to build a real snowman. Yes this was the angry snowman side, the other side was more happy!

This was our second effort to build a real snowman. Yes this was the angry snowman side, the other side was more happy!

  The trail of the snowman making created an interesting drawing in the middle of the park.

The trail of the snowman making created an interesting drawing in the middle of the park.

Rather than complaining about the early arrival of winter, we gathered up the neighbour kids and build ourselves a snowman.  Well, two snowman actually.  The first day it was just a small one on the front lawn. The five year-old just wanted to smash the snowman as fast as we could build it….guess he is from Zurich (see below).

The next day, with new snow, we got more serious. A neighbour joined us and we moved Grand Trunk Park across the street where there was lots of fresh wet snow – ideal for making a life-size snowman. We had to plead with the five-year old from Zurich not to smash it!

The two toddlers loved exploring the park, searching for tree branches under the snow for arms, nose, eyes, mouth and hair. We had so many sticks we create a two-faced, well-skewered snowman. 

Once we were finished, the kids starting stomping, then running around the snowman in some sort of cult-like dance.  Who knows what they were thinking?

Four days later, our snowman is still standing tall and strong.  It even survived the park’s annual Turkey Bowl football game (it is in the middle of the field).  And the daycare kids loved it when they returned from their long weekend. 

I just hope it doesn’t last until April!
  This was our first attempt at a snowman....don't you think the leaves added a nice touch!

This was our first attempt at a snowman....don't you think the leaves added a nice touch!

  The kids decided they wanted to build a snowman on their own and this is the result.

The kids decided they wanted to build a snowman on their own and this is the result.

Snowman Fun Facts

Bob Eckstein, in his book“The History of the Snowman,” gathered an amazing collection of stories and facts about snowmen around the world.  Here are few:

The record for the world's largest snowman was set in 2008 in Bethel, Maine. The snow-woman stood 122 feet 1 inch (37.21 m) in height, and was named in honour of Olympia Snowe, a U.S. Senator representing the state of Maine.  (Note: Ours was 5 feet 6 inches.)

The earliest documentation of a snowman was a marginal illustration from a work titled Book of Hours, found in Koninklijke Bibliotheek in The Hague in 1380AD.

In 1494AD, the ruler of Florence, Italy commissioned 19-year-old Michelangelo to sculpt a snowman in his mansion’s courtyard.

In 1511AD, Brussels - after six weeks of subzero weather and lots of snow - was full of snowmen on every street corner. Many were not your typical fun snowmen, some were angry swipes at the church and government and some were downright pornographic.

The Schenectady Massacre of 1690AD was the result of soldiers at Fort Schenectady, in upstate New York, who decided to leave a pair of snowmen at their post to protect the town so they could escape the blizzard. Unknown to them, a contingent of 210 French Canadian soldiers and Native Americans were approaching. Having traveled over three weeks in knee-deep, slushy snow, they were unfazed by the snowmen. They invaded the fort and killing 60 villagers.

Every year since 1818AD, the people of Zurich, Switzerland, celebrate the beginning of spring by blowing up a snowman. On the third Monday of April, the holiday Sechseläuten is kicked off when a cotton snowman called Böögg is stuffed with dynamite and paraded through town by bakers, blacksmiths, and other tradesmen who throw bread and sausages to the crowds. The parade ends with Böögg being placed on a 40-foot pile of scrap wood. After the bells of the Church of St. Peter have chimed six times, representing the passing of winter, the pile is lit. When the snowman explodes, winter is considered officially over—the shorter the combustion, the longer summer is said to be.

Playing with snow can keep you trim. Laboring for an hour to build a snowman burns more calories than dancing for an hour and is almost equivalent to an hour of bike riding.

Chasing a world record, residents of Sapporo, Japan made 12,379 snowmen in 2003—so many they actually outnumbered the humans.  At night, candles placed in the bellies of the frosty occupants dazzled tourists.

According to the Industrial Engineer Journal, a “perfect” snowman is best attempted when the temperature is near freezing to provide for ideal moisture content. We can attest to that as that was exactly the temperature when we made our snowman; when we rolled the snow, it stuck together perfectly. Proportion is crucial as well; a three-story snowman should consist of spheres ascending from 3 feet in diameter on the bottom to 1 foot on top. It is a science!YouTube has 677,000 videos on how to build a snowman. (this one is my fun fact).

  Grand Trunk Park annual Turkey Bowl happens on Thanksgiving Day snow or shine! The snowman was in the middle of the field, but that didn't seem to bother anyone. 

Grand Trunk Park annual Turkey Bowl happens on Thanksgiving Day snow or shine! The snowman was in the middle of the field, but that didn't seem to bother anyone. 

Last Word

I would love Everyday Tourist readers to email photos of their snowman this winter for a spring ‘17 blog titled “Art of Snowman.” 

  He was really angry a few days laterwhen I took this photo as he had lost his arms, ears and hair....but someone had given him a hat.  Will be interesting to see how he evolves over the next week or so.

He was really angry a few days laterwhen I took this photo as he had lost his arms, ears and hair....but someone had given him a hat.  Will be interesting to see how he evolves over the next week or so.

Fantasy Worlds: Superheroes vs Sports Heroes?

I was invited to the Calgary Stampeders vs. Hamilton Ticats game on Sunday August 28th, 2016 by a friend who knew I grew up as Ticat fanatic - literally. While at the game memories of my childhood (some mine and some told to me by others) flooded back.

Family Day Stampeders

Starting at about 4 years old, I lived and died with Ticats’ wins and losses. When I was in kindergarten, I went to the Quarterback Club with my Mom and I am told I was keen to ask Ron Howell a question – “Do you like football or hockey more?”  Yes, in those days players not only played both offence and defence in football, but could also play more than one professional sport. In addition all of the Ticats had day jobs – many at the steel mills. Being a CFL football player was more of a passion than a profession in the 60s!

By the time I was 6 years old, I knew all the Ticat player’s names and went to all their home games. There were 10+ family and neighbours who would go to each game so it was easy to sneak me in….I can remember by Dad handing the attendant a batch of tickets and we’d all rush in. No scanners or searches in those days!  By the time I was 8 years old, I knew most of the offense and defensive plays and would predict what formations and plays would/should be called throughout the game.  I loved it when someone would say, “that kid should be the coach.”

Football became like a religion for me. I would often sneak away when watching a playoff or Grey Cup game and pray to Jesus to help them win when they were losing (I don’t recall every thanking Jesus when they won).  We would also go to the city pep rallies that were common before big playoff or Grey Cup games in the ‘60s.  The radio stations would even create fun fight songs to motivate the fans and players. For me, players like John Barrow, Angela Mosca, Bernie Faloney, Hal Patterson, Smokie Stover and Garney Henley were my superheroes. 

In fact Henley, was very similar to Superman and Clark Kent - a very unassuming man with black geeky glasses by day, but put on a football uniform and he became a superstar.  He would play safety on defence (a position I would later play in high school) for the most part, but when the game was on the line, he was often put in as a receiver on offence.  And, while everyone on the other team’s defence knew the pass was going to go to him, somehow he found a way to get open and win the game more often than not.

future cheeleader

Cosplay vs. Sports Fans

As I watch the game, I began to see all sports are just another form of cosplay, a phenomenon, which has become all the rage since the mid ‘90s.  Cosplay, is contraction of the words “costume and play,” applies to any costume wearing and role playing of characters from comic books, cartoons, video games, action figures and super heroes from television and movies.

Earlier this year, I attended the Calgary Comic and Entertainment Expo (aka Calgary’s cosplay convention, one of the largest in North America) and was gobsmacked by the number of people who attended, the attention to detail of the costumes and level of role-playing that took place.  For some reason, I felt quite comfortable but didn’t know why as I am not a big comic book or super hero fan.

But a light bulb went on for me while at the Stampeders Ticat game.  I realized it was because when I was young I too would often fantasize about being a super hero, however, in my case it meant a superstar athlete.  When, I would play football on the street and in the park I was always fantasizing. If I was throwing the ball, I would imagine myself as the Ticat quarterback of the day - Bernie Faloney or Joe Zuger. If I was catching the ball, I would be Hal Patterson or Garney Henley.  The same when we played street hockey or in the back yard rinks, we always fantasized what player we wanted to be. In my case it always was Jean Beliveau.  Yes I lived in a fantasy world.

Oskie Wee Wee?

As I continued to watch the game, the similarities just kept coming.  One of the workshops at the Calgary Expo was a lesson in the fictional language of Klingon from the cult Star Trek culture. At the time I didn’t make the connection, but how was this any different from the nonsensical Ticat Oskie Wee Wee chant.

Oskie Wee Wee / Oskie Waa Waa / Holy Mackinaw / Tigers ... Eat 'em RAW!!

Vince Wirtz developed the yell in the 1920s as part of his role-playing as the Hamilton Tigers mascot, Pigskin Pete.  FYI…in 1968 the cheer was the subject of a National Film Board of Calgary documentary.

In fact, mascots, majorettes, marching bands and cheerleaders, which were very much associated with football in 50s and 60s, were really a form of cosplay back in the day.

And then there is the football uniform - helmet that could easily be linked to some super hero or space creature hat, the huge shoulder pads and skin-tight pants that further fostered the idea the players were larger than life.

Superstar vs. Superhero

Fast forward to today. Our five-year-old neighbour is passionate about dressing up as his favourite super hero. With 30+ costumes, he wears one pretty much everyday.  More than once I have wondered, “is this a good thing” but now I remember back to my childhood, when I too lived in a fantasy world much of the time….just a different one!

Last Word

I am also now rethinking Pokémon Go.  The more I think about it, it too is just part of the human need to play and fantasize.  Humans have been fantasizing for millenniums, but how we do it evolves with time just like everything else in life.  

Perhaps we could all benefit from a bit more fantasy, imagination and playfulness in our lives.

Footnote:

Back to the Ticat Stampeders game.  It wasn’t as exciting as I remembered mostly because television has ruined the game for the live audience with the endless breaks for commercials. And the contests and games that are suppose to entertain us during the commercial breaks are silly and insulting.  And don’t get me started about the endless penalties and challenges. 

Also I was disappointed by the Family Day program that included some players signing autographs, face-painting and a couple of slides and bouncing things.  I was expecting football-related activities.  Why not let the kids try to kick the ball through the goal posts or throw balls through hoops? Why not time them on the 40-yard dash and compare their times to CFL players?  Or measure their vertical leaps? What about letting them hit a blocking sled and see what it feels like.  Maybe even have Jon Cornish (he was there signing autographs) show them how he use to practice his running drills.  Maybe even a mini Pass, Putt & Kick competition.  Missed opportunity….big time.

Stampede Park: Calgary's best children's playground?

Call me crazy but I have always thought contemporary public art could make great playground equipment. From time to time I have seen children interacting with public art by climbing, sitting and sliding on it.  Imagine if “Wonderland (aka the big white head)” on the plaza of the Bow Tower was part of a playground and people could climb up and over it. Now that would be exciting public art!

I have talked to some artists and playground designers about my idea of commissioning public art for playgrounds across the city, but always got shot down by them saying, “it would be too expensive and time consuming to get it approved from a safety perspective.”

Until this past Sunday I didn’t realize Calgary already has a wonderful piece of public art that also serves as a playground.  “By the Banks of the Bow” is a giant artwork that includes 15 horses and two cowboys, located in a small park in front of the Agrium Western Event Centre. In the past I have seen families interacting with the piece, but it was nothing like I experienced this year on Family Day at the Stampede.

People of all ages and backgrounds were swarming around what is one of the largest bronze sculptures in North America.  Kudos to the Stampede for not posting signs everywhere saying don’t climb on the sculpture or a fence around keeping people out. 

By the Banks of the Bow 101 (Stampede website)

“By the Banks of the Bow celebrates one of mankind’s greatest living treasures; its wildness and spirit, strength, speed and dependability. It supported the people of the First Nations, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, farmers, town folk, prospectors and adventurers, cowboys and ranchers.

Today the horse retains a pride of place in the Calgary Stampede. In rodeo, the chuckwagon races, the heavy horse competitions or in the show ring, the horse is as iconic as the Stampede itself and is woven into its cultural fabric.

Created by local artists and ranchers Bob Spaith and Rich Roenisch, By the Banks of the Bow is a narrative in bronze that depicts our past, present and future, and reflects the Stampede’s many relationships with our community.”

Fun Facts

  •  From inspiration to installation, the sculpture took four years to complete.
  • The piece was cast in a foundry in Kalispell, Montana.
  •  Ten of the horses represented actually competed at the Calgary Stampede Rodeo.
  • The lead cowboy, Clem Gardner, was the Canadian All Around champion in the first Calgary Stampede Rodeo in 1912.
  • The total sculpture weighs approximately 14,500 pounds (seven tons).

Last Word

It is too bad this type of public art, i.e. art that invites you to interact with it, stop and take pictures of it, isn’t more prevalent in Calgary and elsewhere. 

I also noticed this week the big bronze sculpture of “Outlaw,” the Calgary Stampede’s iconic bull is back on the plaza of 5th Avenue Place but with a big sign saying don’t climb on it.  Too bad…a missed opportunity to add some fun to the downtown experience!

Hmmm…I wonder how I might get some playground public art for Phase two of Grand Trunk Park. The kids would love it!

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Public Art vs Public Playgrounds

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Putting the PUBLIC back into public art!

Flaneuring Calgary's Stampede Poster Parade

One of the oldest Calgary Stampede traditions is the creation of the Stampede Poster.  It began with the very first Stampede in 1912 when Guy Wedick invited iconic Western artist Charlie Russell to provide the artwork for the first poster. Since then, the Stampede poster tradition has evolved significantly from one of advertising all of the Stampede events to becoming a collectors' item.

  Calgary Stampede's first poster. Note the first Stampede took place in early September. 

Calgary Stampede's first poster. Note the first Stampede took place in early September. 

If you are interested in starting a collection, Aquila Books’ website lists a 1945 poster for sale at $650 US and a 1961 poster for $525 US.   In addition, they have a large selection of Stampede posters from the ‘70s to the present.

If you are interested, you can see all of the posters on the Calgary Stampede website, or see them paraded in the +15 concourse connecting the BMO Centre to the Saddledome – expect for 1922, 1926 and 1930 which they have been unable to find for their collection. 

(Backstory: The Stampede didn’t develop an archive until 1999 which meant they had to source all of the posters from other collectors.  If you have one of the missing posters or know someone who might, the Stampede would love to talk to you.)

Link: Stampede Parade of Posters

Calgary Stampede Poster 1913
Calgary Stampede Poster 1914
  Starting in 1923 the poster format became long and narrow - almost ticket-like.

Starting in 1923 the poster format became long and narrow - almost ticket-like.

Flanuering Fun 

For something different to do at Stampede this year, why not flaneur the posters with family and friends. It is sure to bring back memories.  You will discover lots of fun facts, like what years the 3 Stooges or Roy Rogers and Dale Evans were the feature entertainment.  It is fun to see how the admission to the Stampede has changed and discover some intriguing statements like “ Wheat And Meat Will Help Win The War.”

It is also enlightening to see how graphic design has changed over the past 100+ years in typography, colour, paper and printing quality.  The early posters are very busy, full of information with a matte finish, while the modern posters feature a large glossy image with just the name and dates.  It is also interesting to see how the people of the First Nations were featured on many of the early posters, while modern posters focus on the cowboy and his horse.  

In 2007, the Calgary Stampede began commissioning an original artwork for the poster as a means of supporting Western artists and elevated the status of the posters as a work of art in its own right.

Calgary Stampede Poster 1954

Often the Calgary Stampede posters included images and information about other things for tourists to see and do.

Poster History 101

The history of posters, which begins with the invention of lithography in 1798, is a very interesting one. It wasn’t until 1891, that Toulouse-Lautrec’s extraordinary Moulin Rouge posters elevated the status of the poster to fine art and started a poster craze.  The early Stampede posters have much in common with the late 19th early 20th century European Poster culture. At that time, French posters focused on the café and cabaret culture, Italian ones on opera and fashion and Spanish ones on bullfight and festivals, so it is not surprising Calgary’s early poster culture reflects its largest festival and Western heritage and hospitality.

Link: A Brief History of the Poster

Last Word

The concourse area where the posters are displayed is available to visit free anytime of the year, (many of us have passed by rushing too and from the LRT Station to the Saddledome). Bonus: At Stampede time the concourse provides panoramic views of the Stampede grounds with all its colour and pageantry. 

Calgary Stampede Parade of Posters

View of Calgary Stampede from the +15 Concourse.

Hamilton's Art Crawl is indeed super!

For the past 20+ years art galleries across North America have been creating annual art walks, First (or Last or Second) Thursday (or Friday) events as a means of encouraging the public to come out and experience the local visual art scene.  I have experienced dozens of them across North America, but nothing had prepared me for what I would experience on Friday May 13.

May 13, 2016 was a lucky day for me - I got to experience Hamilton’s Art Crawl and event that takes place the second Friday of every month along James Street North (JSN).  I have visited JSN for several years, watching it evolve from a street stuck in the ‘40s and’50s to a quirky street of quirky, cool street of eclectic galleries, restaurants and boutiques, void of the usual revitalization gentrification. 

It is indeed a crawl along the James Street South's sidewalks during Art Crawl. 

James Street North's Art Crawl Maker's Market is located in front yard of Christ's Church Cathedral.  I was surprised that there was a service going on during the Art Crawl.  

Jane Jacobs would love James Street North with all of its tiny shops offering a diversity of things to see and do. 

No Gentrification 

There is no Starbucks, no Tim Hortons, no Shoppers Drug Mart, no boutique hotel or new condos. Instead, the former “Little Portugal” is being repopulated by new “mom and pop” businesses.

The tipping point for JSN’s comeback was in 2005 or 2006 (nobody is quite sure the exact date), when a couple of the new art galleries that had opened up decided to stay open late on the second Friday of every month.  The experiment was popular and it has just built from there.

Facebook: James Street South Art Crawl

Hamilton Jewellers has been on James Street South for over 70 years.

Colourful storefronts and street adornment create a funky hip pedestrian experience along James Street North. 

Morgenstern's department store is a walk back in time to the '40s and '50s. 

Mulberry's Coffeehouse is JSS's signature cafe and patio. 

Ghost town to Extravaganza

Earlier that day, my Mom and I wandered JSN, which was pretty much deserted, but as we left late in the afternoon, we could saw people starting to arrive with tables and artwork.  My Mom said, “Oh, I forgot. Tonight is Art Crawl.”  Lucky my Mom lives just a few blocks away so later that evening (9 pm to be exact), I headed down to check it out. 

As soon as I crossed Main Street (two blocks away) I heard the urban buzz of people chattering and street music. Quickly, I was engulfed in one of the best sidewalk ballets I have experienced anywhere.  I estimate 15,000+ people were wandering up and down the sidewalks, checking out the street vendors, going in and out of shops and stopping to listen to some of the busker music and dancing. It was like I was back on the streets of Mexico City. There was a fun festival spirit that isn’t usually associated with art walks which usually attracts the reserved, wine-sipping sophisticates.

I couldn’t believe how the sleepy street had been transformed from an afternoon ghost town to evening extravaganza.

This fun chair created a fun urban playground during Art Crawl. 

One of the many art galleries along James Street South. 

Art Crawl offers a wonderful diversity of art. 

The art ranges from contemporary to decorative. 

SuperCrawl 

In September, JSN is closed to traffic for the annual SuperCrawl which attracts over 100,000 people to a weekend festival of visual art and music that is a smash-up of local and international artists.

The transformation of JSS from Little Portugal to a hip arts district has not gone unnoticed. It has captured the attention of New York City-based Projects For Public Spaces (founded in 1975 by William Whyte, author of the seminal public spaces book “The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces”) as one of best examples of how artists and art can transform a neglected space into something special. 

These ladies just had to dance to the music. 

The proud owner of a new painting just had to have his picture taken with his new acquisition. 

Last Word

If you are in the Hamilton area on a second Friday, I strongly encourage you to take in JSN Art Crawl.  And if you are into the visual arts, music and fun festivals, mark your calendar to be in Hamilton September 9 to 11, 2016. 

Indeed, Hamilton is more than Tim Hortons and the Ti-cats!

Street art adds another dimension to JSS's reputation as one of Canada's best art districts. 

ADAC Calgary: Gallery Hop!

What is ADAC you ask? NOT to be confused with AADAC (Alberta Alcohol & Drug Abuse Commission) it stands for Art Dealers Association of Canada.

This national self-governing, not-for-profit organization founded in 1966 gives accreditation to private art gallery owners who meet set standards for experience, knowledge, scholarship and professionalism in the same manner as other professionals have their respective accreditation associations.  

   Masters Gallery's  feature exhibition for Gallery Hop is "Algonquin" by Amy Dryer. 

Masters Gallery's feature exhibition for Gallery Hop is "Algonquin" by Amy Dryer. 

   Jarvis Hall Gallery's  feature exhibition for Gallery Hop is "FROM THE PAGE," artworks from the sketchbooks and notebooks of Bill Rodgers. 

Jarvis Hall Gallery's feature exhibition for Gallery Hop is "FROM THE PAGE," artworks from the sketchbooks and notebooks of Bill Rodgers. 

Lets all go to the Hop!

On May 28th from 11 am to 5 pm Calgary's eight ADAC-accredited galleries invite Calgarians to visit. Local artists and gallery owners will answer questions and share information on the artists that exhibit at the gallery, history of the gallery, what kind of art it specializes in and talk about the importance of supporting local professional artists.   In addition, each gallery is offering artist-led tours of the current exhibitions.  

Did you know?

Most ADAC galleries offer a “no-interest payment over time” option to help make your art purchase fit with your budget.  Some galleries will also offer to buy back your artwork years later, or you can trade in your piece for a credit on a different work, recognizing tastes often evolve or you might want a piece that better fits that special place in your new home. 

Owners will also be on hand to share information about the various services the gallery offers. Many people don’t realize many galleries offer trial periods where you can take the art home with you, live with it for a period of time and then return it if it doesn’t quite work for you or make arrangements to try something else. 

In a nutshell, ADAC galleries want to work with collectors –whether new or seasoned - to help them develop their appreciation for art and build an art collection unique for their tastes. 

Herringer Kiss Gallery offers two solo exhibitions for Gallery Hop. 

   
  
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     In the context of collecting significant historical Canadian artwork, Ian Loch will discuss some special historical works including pieces from the Loch family private collection - from Krieghoff to Kurelek at  Loch Gallery . 

In the context of collecting significant historical Canadian artwork, Ian Loch will discuss some special historical works including pieces from the Loch family private collection - from Krieghoff to Kurelek at Loch Gallery

   Trepanier Baer Gallery's  feature exhibition is Marcel Barbeau: Amour champagne et autre choses. 

Trepanier Baer Gallery's feature exhibition is Marcel Barbeau: Amour champagne et autre choses. 

Wallace Gallery will feature "Spring Group Show II, 2016" including: David Alexander, William Duma, Peter Krausz, Gregory Hardy, Linda Nardelli, Harold Barling Town, David Newkirk, Erika Olson, and more.  Gregory Hardy's "Slew by the house" is just one of the paintings that will be featured in the exhibition.  

Facing Reality!

In the late 80s, I used to give a talk to Alberta College of Art and Design students titled “Facing Reality!” I spoke of the need for them to produce and sell 100 artworks (two per week) at $1,000 each per year to make about $30,000 per annum salary.

How could that be? Simple. If an artist sells $100,000 worth of art a year, they will share 50% of that with the gallery in commissions, so they are down to $50,000. And out of that $50,000 they have to pay cost of materials and studio rental, making them lucky if they clear $30,000.  I then asked them, “how many of your parents, family or friends of their parents had ever spent $1,000 on a work of art?”  The silence was deafening. It was a rude awakening.

From a gallery perspective, they to have to sell a lot of art every month of the year at $1,000/artwork to pay for salaries, rent, operating, framing and marketing costs. So when you see a price tag of $1,000+ in an ADAC gallery, don’t be shocked. This is real art by professionals - not some mass-produced artworks from a factory

The art has been produced by a professional artists, who have spent years developing their techniques and imagery, who have probably thrown away more artworks than they have exhibited and who get only one or two exhibitions a year if they lucky.  It is a struggle to make a living as a visual artist given limited selling opportunities and the need to sell your work for thousands not hundreds of dollars.

Joshua Jensen-Nagle and Newzones Gallery present "Endless Summer" a culmination of 12 years of working with the beach as a subject, inspiration by his childhood summers for Gallery Hop visitors.  Image: Joshua Jensen-Nagle: “An Expression”, 2015 ed./7, Photo Face Mounted to Plexi, 43”x88”

If you like it buy it!

I also use to say, “Too often people who wouldn’t think twice about spending $30,000 on a car that depreciates by $15,000 in 5 years, wouldn’t even consider investing $3,000 on an artwork. Or, many Calgarians who willingly spend $1,000+ on a new bike every few years or a weekend getaway every year, wouldn’t dream of spending $1,000 on an artwork they might have for the rest of their lives.” People don’t think twice about spending $2,000+ on a sofa or a new computer that they will keep for maybe 5 years or less.

Back in the ‘80s, when I was the Director/Curator at the Muttart Art Gallery (now Contemporary Calgary), I often advised people to set aside $1,000+ per year to buy one major artwork a year.  In so doing, after ten years, one would have a very nice art collection that reflects personal tastes, and can be enjoyed every day for the rest of your life.  

Too often people say, “I need to save up before I can buy art.” To which I would respond, if you see something you like, ask the gallery if they will talk instalment payments so you can enjoy the art while you pay it off (we do that with cars all the time).

   
  
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   The  Paul Kuhn Gallery  is pleased to present “crank that”, a group show of gallery artists, notably, Ashleigh Bartlett, Robin Deyo, John Eisler, Geoffrey Hunter and Mark Mullin.     The title of the exhibition borrows its’ name from a hip hop dance move primarily performed to hip hop music as part of hip culture. This exhibition is loosely associated with hip hop in its capacity to shock and inspire. The so called “free style’ of this art is a misnomer as both the dance and the paintings often are carefully developed in the studio by classically trained artists.     While both seem to work intuitively, there is a level of sophistication and refinement in their art.  Like hip hop, the paintings are part of a post modern genre defined by real time practice rather than any sense of a unified theory or movement. It is an art made in a time when there is no acknowledged period identity for contemporary art and no consensus on the role of the avant garde.

The Paul Kuhn Gallery is pleased to present “crank that”, a group show of gallery artists, notably, Ashleigh Bartlett, Robin Deyo, John Eisler, Geoffrey Hunter and Mark Mullin.

 The title of the exhibition borrows its’ name from a hip hop dance move primarily performed to hip hop music as part of hip culture. This exhibition is loosely associated with hip hop in its capacity to shock and inspire. The so called “free style’ of this art is a misnomer as both the dance and the paintings often are carefully developed in the studio by classically trained artists.

 While both seem to work intuitively, there is a level of sophistication and refinement in their art.  Like hip hop, the paintings are part of a post modern genre defined by real time practice rather than any sense of a unified theory or movement. It is an art made in a time when there is no acknowledged period identity for contemporary art and no consensus on the role of the avant garde.

True Confession

As an undergraduate at McMaster University in Hamilton, I used my one and only student loan to buy five limited edition prints from ADAC Galleries in Toronto and Hamilton (Toni Only, Gordon Smith, David Blackwood, Karl Appel and Pierre Alechinsky) all of which I still have today. Not only has each appreciated in value, but I have appreciated looking at them for over 40 years.

Last Word

And while talking art at Gallery Hop, enjoy a wine and art pairing by Metrovino at the galleries.  You can even stop by Metrovino (right on the hop behind NewZones and Paul Kuhn galleries) and pick up a bottle or two of your favourite grape art.

It doesn’t get much better than that! 

Austin's Kite Festival: Cheap, Colourful, Chaotic & Crazy!

For a long time I have been saying Calgary needs a kite festival. What the heck every city needs a kite festival.  Here in Calgary, a kite festival would be a great signature event for Fort Calgary and East Village.  When I knew we would be in Austin in early March, I was thrilled to discover we could attend their annual kite festival – the world’s oldest.

Each year Austin’s Kite Festival attracts over 20,000 people of all ages and is one of the city’s best-known annual events. Held on the first Sunday of March, (the second Sunday of March is the alternate day if weather doesn’t cooperate),

Family fun for everyone at the Austin Kite Festival.

 

It is the kick-off to springtime in Austin

Everyone is welcome – there is no admission to attend, no obligation to participate in the contests or even fly a kite.  Most folks do try their hand at flying a kite, but some just come to see the spectacular sight of thousands of kites in the sky and to enjoy a spring day in the park. It is perhaps one of the most inclusive events I have every seen.

Too Much Fun

The festival lived up to my expectations. There was lots of excitement in the air when I arrived at 11 am in the massive park (350 acres i.e. 16 times the size of Calgary’s Riley Park). 

I overheard one kite flyer say he was there at 6 am to get the best spot. (Hmmm – sounds like something one would here on Stampede Parade Day in Calgary.)  Another guy said he had driven six hours to get there and does so every year. Many young families, pulling wagons with food, coolers and assorted paraphernalia (some even with their dog) came out for the day.

The kids were all smiles with lots of room to run, twirl and look at all of the dancing kites. I was shocked at how many young kids were actually able to fly the kites.  And while it looked very chaotic with people scattered everywhere and invisible strings being manipulated at every which angle, I saw only a few injured kites and no injured kids.  It was a Sunday miracle.

I think the photo and video speak for themselves.

A sense of the chaos that is the Austin Kite festival. 

Photographers love to get just the right perspective.

The kite festival is pure joy for little ones. 

Bubble making fun is also part of the kite festival.

It is not just kids and families that enjoy Austin's Kite Festival. 

History 

The ‘Kite Tournament’ was created in 1929 by a men’s service club called The Exchange Club of Austin with a mission to encourage creativity in children. Exchange Club President Ed St. John came up with the idea to give kids a constructive activity the community could participate in. The first Tournament was held in Lamar Park, which is thought to have been close to the intersection of Congress Avenue and 1st Street in the middle of downtown.

In 1936, the Exchange Club partnered with the City of Austin Parks and Recreation Department to bring the event to newly opened and larger Zilker Park. In 1956, the Kite Tournament was opened to competitors of all ages, and to this day contest events have changed very little.

Austin’s Zilker Park Kite Festival is the longest continuously running kite festival in the United States and continues to be sponsored by the Exchange Club and the City of Austin Parks and Recreation Department every year. Its lead corporate sponsor for 2016 was ABC Home and Commercial.

Last Word

Austin’s Kite Festival is cheap, colourful, chaotic and crazy – all in a very good way. 

Wouldn't it be great if this open field at Fort Calgary became the home for an annual kite festival and perhaps an informal kite flying park when not in use for festivals.