Rosebud: A Prairie Gem!

Guest blog by Terry Bachynski

Whenever you are looking for a day away from the city, our natural tendencies in Calgary and Edmonton are to look and head west to the Rockies.  A day of hiking, kayaking, mountain biking, skiing or just taking in the beauty of our Rocky Mountains is always a great respite from the city traffic and pace.

However, there is so much more that our province offers.  My wife, Laura, and I like to explore Alberta randomly.  Just get in the car and head in any direction and see what we can find.  Exploring small towns is one of our favourite ways to spend a free day. 

One such day adventure, near 30 years ago, lead us north and east out of Calgary. We headed for Drumheller and the Badlands.  But, we never got there.  Heading east on Highway 9 we came upon a road sign that said “Rosebud 10 km”. Rosebud?  The name was too tempting. 

We had to see it for ourselves. A south turn onto secondary highway 840 and a short trip down a winding, up and down road finally ended (literally) in a small valley along the Rosebud River and the quaint hamlet of Rosebud.

Along the road to Rosebud

Entering Rosebud from atop the valley you first notice a small grouping of prairie town buildings and the ever present grain elevator to the south. As we approached, we noticed that, unlike other isolated and all too forgotten prairie hamlets, this cluster of buildings looked in reasonably good shape and in use! 

We quickly determined that Rosebud was more than what met the eye.  The entire town exists and thrives beyond its history of farming and coal mining.  The town is a hub of artistic creativity.  That first accidental visit found us arriving just in time for the buffet dinner and stage show.  We grabbed a couple of tickets, enjoyed a delicious buffet dinner and then crossed the street to the opera house for the live show.

The economic and creative anchor for the town is the Rosebud School of the Arts and Rosebud Theatre.  Doing a little research for this blog, I discovered that the artistic heartbeat of the town started with a “one-off” summer camp for high school kids in 1977.  Since then, the Rosebud School of the Arts has grown into a post-secondary educational institution focused on development of theatre arts. 

The Rosebud Theatre offers a full year of live stage productions in the restored and renovated prairie opera house as well as second studio stage.  The productions are far ranging - dramas, musicals, comedies - and always family friendly. We’ve seen dozen of shows over the years and we are never disappointed with the production quality and talent on the stage.  These actors have chops!

Over the years, we have come to know many of the people who work and live in Rosebud.  It is always a treat to visit and spend a couple of days in the area.  When you go, you’ve got plenty of options for comfortable and welcoming accommodations. 

Link: Discover Rosebud

B&B Fun....

The Rosebud Country Inn is run by BJ.  She’s a sweetheart and took over the Country Inn 7 or 8 years ago.  It’s a great place to stay with delicious afternoon tea and pie served up most afternoons.

  Rosebud Country Inn. Love the porch!

Rosebud Country Inn. Love the porch!

If BJ’s is full, there are several other options.  The Actor’s Studio B&B is operated by Nathan and Cassia, both excellent actors who frequent the boards on the Rosebud stage.  Nathan also makes a mean apple pancake breakfast that just makes your mouth water.  Delicious!

The Rose Cottage Bed and Breakfast is a unique experience every time you visit.  John and Sue decorate the breakfast room in the theme of the current mainstage show at the time.  On our last visit, the entire room was dressed up like a set from Downton Abbey. 

Sue’s home town cooking is delicious.  During our last visit, they invited us to have dinner with them and we were fed a feast fit for a harvest crew.  In fact, that is what it was.  Sue and John also provide hot dinners to the harvest crew of a local farmer every night during harvest season and deliver the meal to the workers in the field.  They invited us to join them. 

Thankfully, for us, the “on location” dinner was canceled because a cold front moved in.  (We didn’t have the right clothes for the field.) So, we just pulled up to their kitchen table and chowed down on delicious sausage, root vegetables, purple cabbage and a spectacular apple crisp accented with a zest of orange.  What a treat!

Link: Rosebud Country Inn B&B

Link: Actor's Studio B&B

  A hearty Rosebud breakfast...

A hearty Rosebud breakfast...

Art Fun.....

The hamlet also swings way above its weight class with the various shops available to theatre patrons.  The Mercantile, Kith and Kin and other shops offer lovely, artistic and unique products, many created by local artisans.  You are certain to find something special that you will not find “in the mall” back home.

We have spent a valentine’s weekend in Rosebud where the entire town pulled together to create a wonderful experience for couples.  We, along with several other couples who flocked to Rosebud for Valentine’s Day enjoyed many special events created by the community for us.

Of course, we took in the dinner theatre and second stage productions.  However, we also enjoyed bonfires, hay rides, cooking classes, coffee tasting classes (just like wine tasting, but with varieties of coffees – we learned so much about the art of coffee making), live music performances and many other special experiences created just for the town’s guests.

Since accidentally stumbling upon this prairie gem, Laura and I have become more connected with the community.  We are both artists and retired actors, ourselves, so, perhaps our connection to the community has something to do with our personal interests.  

This connection, however, has created an opportunity for us as well. The community supports artists.  We currently have our art hanging in the Akokiniskiway Art Gallery through to the end of October.  All proceeds from the sale of our art go to support the Rosebud School of the Arts. 

  Terry Bachynski's playful prairie paintings inspired by trips to Rosebud, Alberta

Terry Bachynski's playful prairie paintings inspired by trips to Rosebud, Alberta

  Laura Bachynski's nostalgic photos inspired by years of exploring Alberta's back roads. 

Laura Bachynski's nostalgic photos inspired by years of exploring Alberta's back roads. 

A Prairie Success Story

Of course, so many people would say there is nothing to do in a small, isolated prairie hamlet.  How could you possibly keep yourself engaged and interested when you can literally walk from one end of town to the other in less than five minutes? I can promise you that Rosebud will surprise and delight you.  

Rosebud is a prairie success story.  A small hamlet that has re-invented itself and has created an oasis of creativity and community generosity.  The entire town thrives because they care about what they have created. 

So, take a couple of days, book a room at a local B&B, take in the current stage production, enjoy dinner, take a walk down the main street and explore the Akokiniskiway Art Gallery.  Get to know Rosebud. 

You’ll come back for more.

Editor's Note: 

"Gentle Scenes Gentle Dreams" is the title of Laura and Terry's exhibition at the Akokiniskiway Art Gallery until the end of October 2016. Below is their artists' statement: 

Laura and Terry Bachynski are both heavily influenced by their daily experiences from their travels within and beyond Alberta’s boarders. The married couple travel often and widely, frequently with paints and canvas in tow, seeking out new experiences. 

Laura is often drawn to the stories of intimate spaces and images that translate to the detailed attention to mood and personal experience in her images. Often you feel that you can sit and rest inside one of Laura’s paintings and become a part of the setting.

Terry looks at the landscape as an inspiration to allow his imagination to create images of flowing skies, rolling hills and distant horizons.  Many of his paintings, although inspired by his experience in the landscape, manifest in an almost abstract interpretation of all that surrounds us.

Laura’s artistic expression is founded in the intimacies of life’s scenes while Terry’s interpretations look beyond the physical space and explore the energy that lies behind it.  Both artists, in their own way, praise God for the beauty around us and endeavor to share their experience of The Great Creation with others through their works.

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Garden Flaneuring: Try it you might like it!

Why wait until you are on holidays to have flaneuring fun?  For many people, one of the fun things to do is visit gardens when they are on holidays.  Even those who aren’t into gardening, often love to “stop and smell the flowers” when on vacation. 

Bird baths create a wonderful sense of place in a garden. 

Standout Front Yards

While it may not be the equivalent to visiting Vancouver Island’s Buchart Gardens, Chicago’s Botanical Gardens, Hamilton’s Royal Botanical Gardens or Portland’s Japanese Garden, most of us can go for a walk in our neighbourhood and enjoy the lovely front gardens of our neighbours.  For those who love art, garden flaneuring can be like going to Santa Fe and visiting the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum.  In our neighbourhood one or two homes on every block have a "standout" front yard or perhaps a special flower.

Iris Eroticism

  The irises were lovely this year.  Every time I see an iris I can't help but think of Georgia O'Keeffe. Link:     Georgia O'Keeffe

The irises were lovely this year.  Every time I see an iris I can't help but think of Georgia O'Keeffe. Link: Georgia O'Keeffe

Iris erotism
  Found this guy hidden under a large shrub in our front garden. 

Found this guy hidden under a large shrub in our front garden. 

  Irises have to one of the most erotic flowers. 

Irises have to one of the most erotic flowers. 

 Need I say more....

Need I say more....

Meet The Neighbours?

Wandering the neighbourhood checking out the gardens is often full of unexpected surprises.   While out gardening flaneuring, we will often say “lovely garden” when we see someone working in their yard, which always elicits a smile and sometimes even a brief chat.

Fun With Colours?

  Poppies have the most wonderful colour and shapes, especially in the morning light.  

Poppies have the most wonderful colour and shapes, especially in the morning light. 

It looked like these lilies were on fire one morning in June. 

  It has been a great year in Calgary for roses.  

It has been a great year in Calgary for roses.  

Dying Flower Art

  Sometimes I think flowers are most interesting as they are dying, they become more asymmetrical and sculptural.  

Sometimes I think flowers are most interesting as they are dying, they become more asymmetrical and sculptural.  

  Found this work of art on the next block, couldn't resist taking it photo. 

Found this work of art on the next block, couldn't resist taking it photo. 

  This peony captured my eye as I was finishing up the blog, more and more I am appreciating the beauty in the dying flower. 

This peony captured my eye as I was finishing up the blog, more and more I am appreciating the beauty in the dying flower. 

Deep Purple 

  Found this huge clematis (6+ inches wide) in a forgotten side garden near the end of our garden flaneur vacation.  It was perfectly formed and totally open. 

Found this huge clematis (6+ inches wide) in a forgotten side garden near the end of our garden flaneur vacation.  It was perfectly formed and totally open. 

  This is perhaps my favourite flower from our garden this season.

This is perhaps my favourite flower from our garden this season.

  I didn't even know they made speckled petunias.  Found these in a pot a few blocks away, while garden flaneuring recently. Next year!

I didn't even know they made speckled petunias.  Found these in a pot a few blocks away, while garden flaneuring recently. Next year!

Everyday Gardening Fun

Or if you are like me, you can create your own garden, which you can flaneur every day as there is always something new to experience in a garden. 

Just like a tourist, wander the garden with your iPhone or camera and take pictures every day.  I have often thought it would be interesting to post a “garden pic-a-day” from April to October and see what kind of response I get.  I will often tweet out a photo from one of my morning garden flaneurs with the text “Goooooooood Morrrrrrrrrrrrrrning Calgary!” 

Gardening is not only therapeutic but it can also be a fun way to get to know your neighbours. In our case, we have bonded with our neighbours on both sides over our gardens, so much so that we have integrated our front yards into one large garden.  (Backstory: This is ironic as the three houses sit on land that was one lot until the early ‘90s when an infill developer bought the 100-foot lot and subdivided it into three lots.)

  The pathway to our secret garden was littered with rose pedals after a recent rain, create a romantic sense of place.

The pathway to our secret garden was littered with rose pedals after a recent rain, create a romantic sense of place.

Daycare Fun!

One of my little pleasures in life, it taking my morning coffee and wandering the garden while parents drop off their kids at the “Honey Bee” daycare across the street. The kids wave and the parents smile; the start of another perfect summer day – that is until the first double bogie on the golf course.  

  In our front yard we have two old pieces of playground equipment.  The hamburglar looks out from an old fence we rescued from a house across the street that was being torn down for a new infill. The daycare kids love it.  

In our front yard we have two old pieces of playground equipment.  The hamburglar looks out from an old fence we rescued from a house across the street that was being torn down for a new infill. The daycare kids love it.  

  We also have Tommy The Turtle hidden in the front yard jungle.  There are two daycare kids who have found it and ask if they can sit on it, if I am in the yard. 

We also have Tommy The Turtle hidden in the front yard jungle.  There are two daycare kids who have found it and ask if they can sit on it, if I am in the yard. 

  Note the golf clubs?

Note the golf clubs?

  Flaneuring gardens at night is a totally different experience from day time flaneuring.  You should try it.

Flaneuring gardens at night is a totally different experience from day time flaneuring. You should try it.

Try It! You Might Just Like It!

So if you want to try being an “everyday tourist” this summer, grab your camera and go for walk taking pictures of the neighbours’ gardens.  When you get home, grab your favourite beverage and have a look at your pics and relive the beauty of your travels, just like you would on vacation.

If you like it, consider taking a “garden flaneur” vacation every week.

Black and white garden photography lets you see your garden in a whole different light (pun intended). 

  This image is taken of  grass mound with the frosted glass patio fence in the background. It is amazing all the things you see when you take out your camera and start looking. 

This image is taken of  grass mound with the frosted glass patio fence in the background. It is amazing all the things you see when you take out your camera and start looking. 

  Gardens are fun places to experiment. 

Gardens are fun places to experiment. 

  Our other bird bath. 

Our other bird bath. 

Everyday Tourist Visits Calgary Expo 2016

While I am not into comics, action heroes, video games or fantasy, I was an early fan of the Big Bang Theory TV show.  As a result, by osmosis I have become very curious about cosplay and the comic-con culture.  

Calgary Expo (our comic-con convention and trade show) has grown exponentially since its inception in 2006.  Today it is the second largest in Canada with attendance exceeding 100,000 people.  

As an everyday tourist, how could I not go this year and see for myself what our Calgary Expo is all about.

Day 1

I was in "people watching" heaven with all of the costumes and displays. There were smiles everywhere and everyone loved to get their picture taken.  The Calgary Expo has many interesting elements - a mini film festival, educational workshops, autograph and photo opportunities with your favourite fantasy character.

After people watching for an hour or so, I headed to the lecture halls and found a Special Effects Cosplay Photography with Vancosplay workshop. This was way out the universe I operate in, but I did get a couple of good tips on some software that I might play with.  Always learn something! 

Next I checked out the short film "Downtime" about a frustrated husband desperate for some downtime, who heads out on an impromptu fishing trip.  It probably won't win any awards but it was interesting to watch.

I missed the "How to Nerd-provise! An Improve Workshop" which would have been fun, I have always enjoyed improv and have been curious about giving it a try. This would have been the perfect opportunity. 

I did attend the "Conversational Klingon: Express Yourself in a ConLand" class by Joseph Windsor  a University of Calgary PHD student.  I had no clue what he was talking about, but the audience loved it.  

The big surprise of the day was having Canada Post at the end of the Klingon lecture unveil two new Star Trek posters.  I am a sucker for surprises. 

It is all about the kids!

The highlight of day one were the children who seemed to be in awe at what they were seeing. 

Day 2 POW: Parade of Wonder 

Day 2 began with everyone gathering at the Eau Claire Plaza starting at 9 am to register, make final costume adjustments and to take lots of pictures.

Again, everyone was keen to have their picture taken, it was an urban photographer's heaven. 

The route went from Eau Claire Plaza, north on 3rd Street SW to Stephen Avenue Walk, where it proceeded east to Olympic Plaza for the Calgary Expo Official Opening by the Mayor. 

The parade lasted about 20 minutes and everyone seemed very pleased - those who watched and those who walked. I think the photos speak for themselves. 

The downtown air was electric with excitement!

The Parade on Stephen Ave.

Olympic Plaza Calgary Expo Opening 

Last Word

Day 3 and 4 were were amazing with thousands of colourful characters of all ages, shapes and sizes animating Stampede Park like I have never seen it before.  

The lectures and panel discussions were very interesting with talks about everything from the Zombie Apocalypse by two University of Calgary professors, to a discussion of Cosplay and body image.  The panel discussion with Jackie Cruz and Lea Delaria of Orange is the New Black to a standing room only audience at the Boyce Theatre, was one of the best improv comedy shows I have seen in years. 

For an urban guy who loves colour, street animation and people the Calgary Expo is now near the top of my list of my favourite Calgary festivals. I love that it attracts people of all ages and from all walks of life. 

I also love how it animated Stampede Park and demonstrated to me how the Park is truly a community park and not just about the 10 days of Stampede.   

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It's Easy To Be An Everyday Tourist!

You don't have to try that hard to be an everyday tourist wherever you live.  You just have to get out and walk with a bit of curiosity and your eyes wide open.   

This week's highlights included:

  • An early morning walk in River Park with the morning sun glistening off the Bow River.
  • A dog walk with Rossi to the base of the Glenmore Dam
  • A trip to Evergreen to get my income taxes done
  • Downtown flaneuring
  • Walking home from yoga enjoyed a lovely evening chinook from the West Hillhurst bluff
  • A spectacular sunset from my backyard
  • Wandering Bowness Park
  • A morning walk in my community
  • Reading Jan Morris' book "Hong Kong" published in 1997

Here is my Everyday Tourist Week in photos....hope you enjoy.

Early Saturday morning walk with Rossi in River Park looking down on the sun glistening off the Elbow River. It was magical. 

With Calgary's early spring there are these lovely rag dolls everywhere. 

Sunday Rossi and I decided to go for along walk that took us to Calgary's Glenmore Dam, which use to have cars driving on top of it, but today it is a wonderful pedestrian bridge. 

Water rushing out of the Glenmore dam. 

Glenmore dam was built in 1932 for $3.8 million.  It has wonderful Art Deco elements. 

Found this debris still wrapped around a tree from the 2013 flood. 

These rocks haunted me with the way the light was reflecting off of them. 

A trip to the community of Evergreen to drop off paper work for income tax resulted in this photo. 

I am always amazed at what new things I can find when wandering downtown.  This fancy fence is part of a temporary plaza on top of the underground parkade where the York Hotel use to sit. The patterns on the fence are taken from the decorations on the facade of the hotel. 

Construction Impressionism in downtown Calgary.  For me downtown Calgary is just one big outdoor art gallery. 

Window licking collage in downtown Calgary. 

7th Avenue surrealism in downtown Calgary 

3rd Avenue downtown Calgary 

I had no idea I had captured this woman in this photo when I took it.  At the time I was cursing that the windows were dirty and I couldn't get clean reflections. Now I love the ambiguity of the narrative that this image suggests. Urban surprises come in many different ways. 

Coming home from yoga I notice the Chinook Arch forming in the west and decided to detour to the West Hillhurst bluff (aka dog park) to get a better view. I never get tired of Calgary's iconic cloud formation. 

While in the park I found this huge tree branch, which ironically mirrored the Chinook Arch formation.  What a great idea for public artwork?

Just a few blocks from my house I found this Horse Head tree swing.  For some reason it seemed very disturbing. (not that there is anything wrong with that) If you like this image you might like Front Yard Fun blog.

Also just a few blocks away is a house where the porch has become a bike rack. I love the fact that my community is filling up with young kids. 

Looking forward to Bowness Park this summer. It will be like a walk back in time with the renovations. 

One night as I am watching the NHL playoffs I notice a bright yellow light shinning in my backyard.  When I went outside this is what I found. 

Calgary: Capturing The Art In ARchiTecture!

I have always loved how photography can capture the link between art and architecture, especially with contemporary architecture. For several years, I have been collecting images that capture downtown Calgary unique urban design aesthetics.  There is something about the light, latitude and the close proximity of 40 million square feet of office space that creates an urban surrealism that I have not experienced in other skyscraper cities.   

I thought the "pecha kucha" format which is 20 slides each shown for 20 seconds for a 6 minute and 40 second presentation while the speaker gives his or her talk would be an interesting format for a blog. 

I this case there will be no speaker or text, the photography speak for itself.  But I challenge you to study each image for about 20 seconds (a little longer than a glance) and see what happens.

Enjoy!

Princeton reflection in Shaw
Grain Exchange Building, Calgary
Blue Abstraction downtown Calgary

University of Texas: Backpack Fashion Show

One of the things we love to do when visiting a new city is to flaneur the university campus. We love the youthful vibrancy and are usually rewarded with a few surprises. We made some very interesting discoveries when flaneuring post-secondary campuses (see links at end of blog).  

So when in Austin, we decided to spend a Thursday morning checking out the Blanton Art Museum (free all day Thursday) and then flaneur the campus to see what hidden gems we cold find.

After finishing wandering the museum (highly recommended), we just followed the student pedestrian traffic into the centre of campus. Quickly we were swarmed by students trying to give us free stuff.  I still have no clue what was going on or why they were giving away things.

I think there is only one student in this photo who doesn't have a backpack.

Button Making Fun For Everyone!

Eventually, we did stop for four young women, who didn’t want any money, who asked us if we wanted to make personalize buttons for free. Who could resist?  In the end we made five and took a sixth one from their pre-made bin.  They didn’t want to take any money, but we gave them a donation.

Who could resist these smiles and the opportunity to make art buttons?

Backpacks Gone Wild

We wandered a bit further and the foot traffic was incredible, it was literally like an ant farm. Maybe a better analogy would be like a NYC subway station at rush hour.  We decided to just sit and absorb the amazing energy.  

After a few minutes I said to Brenda “I bet 90% of the students are wearing backpacks.” She looked around and said, “I bet it is higher. I am having a hard time finding a single student who doesn’t have one.”  

We then wondered when did the backpack become such an integral part of our everyday lives.  We often laugh when we walk by elementary schools and the backpack is almost as big as the child. It seems like people young and old don’t go anywhere these days without a backpack.

Backpack as a fashion statement!

If you Google “ What does your backpack say about you?” you will get over 34 million results in 1 second. 

I am not going to bore you with what they had to say. But I have integrated some fashion quotes with the postcard images that I thought might stimulate some backpack as a fashion statement thinking.

Has the backpack has become not only critical to our everyday life, but is it also a fashion statement. 

Below is a small sample of the backpack fashion show we experience at lunch at the University of Texas, Austin, campus on March 3, 2016. I hope you enjoy the show. 

Coco Chanel

'Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening.'

Marilyn Monroe

'Give a girl the right shoes (backpack) and she can conquer the world.'

Christian Dior

'You can never take too much care over the choice of your shoes. Too many women think that they are unimportant, but the real proof of an elegant woman is what is on her feet (should that be her back).'

Alexander Wang

Anyone can get dressed up and glamorous, but it is how people dress in their days off that are the most intriguing.'

Orson Welles


Style is knowing who you are, what you want to say, and not giving a damn.'

Backpack makes subtle political/social statement.

Love me, love my backpack

Michelle Obama

'If I can have any impact, I want women to feel good about themselves and have fun with fashion'

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As chance would have it the next day I was heading to Cafe Medici for a cup of java and passing the Mathews Elementary School I was treated to another back back fashion show. 


Austin: Isamu Taniguchi Japanese Garden

From Zilker Garden website: "Opened to the public in 1969, the Garden was built by Mr. Taniguchi when he was seventy years old. Working without a salary or a contract, Mr. Taniguchi spent 18 months transforming 3 acres of rugged caliche hillside into a peaceful garden. As is often done in Japan, the ponds were designed in the shape of a word or ideogram. In this case, the ponds in the first half of the garden spell out the word "AUSTIN", reflecting the fact that these gardens were constructed as a gift to the city. The remains of the Mother Tree, which inspired Mr. Taniguchi to complete his building of the garden, overlooks the pond.

The Togetsu-kyo bridge or "Bridge to Walk Over the Moon" is theoretically positioned so that, when the moon is high, it reflects in the water and follows you across the bridge. The idea is that as you gaze at the reflection of the moon on the water's surface, ultimate universal beauty will be revealed to you."

Indeed, the Japanese Garden was the highlight of our visit to the Zilker Park's Botanical Garden. In fact, the rest of the garden was a bit of a disappointment even though irises and some trees and shrubs were flowers were out in the neighbourhood gardens there wasn't any flowers in the rest of the garden.  In fact, much of the garden looked like it needed a good weeding.  The children's garden was just sad.  Enough said!

Here are a baker's dozen of postcards from Isamu Taniguchi's Japanese Garden. Hope you enjoy!

under bridge

Austin's Wonderful, Wacky & Weird Outdoor Art Gallery

I had read about and seen pictures of Austin’s Hope Outdoor Gallery (HOG), but they did not prepare me for the three-storey outdoor graffiti gallery located on an abandon inner-city lot on the side of hill over-looking downtown.

Backstory: I love graffiti art. I even travelled from Gleichen, Alberta to New York City in the early ‘80s to experience graffiti art in its heyday - from subway cars to upscale art galleries. I came back and created several graffiti murals on the sides of buildings in Gleichen as well as incorporated it into my studio painting.  That was another life.

The view from the top gives you a sense of the height and scale of the project.  

From The Top

Found this spray can at the top of the Gallery, inviting me to contribute.  I am tempted to go back. 

We entered from the top of the gallery, which is not the usual entrance, which is at the bottom along Baylor Street at 11th Street. We were walking from our Clarksville Airbnb apartment so I knew we could get there taking the back route, but couldn’t quite find it. 

Knowing we were close and seeing a fireman getting out of his car at a charming historic fire station we asked him how to get to the outdoor gallery. He pointed and said, “Go to the end of the No Outlet (aka cul de sac) street that we had just passed and you will be at the top.” He also warned us to be careful if we tried to walk down as the area is badly washed out. Oh those fireman, they are always looking out for everyone’s safety.

Heading down the street we first came upon a wonderful castle-looking estate over looking the city. We soon found out its the offices of Castel Hill Partners and wondered how they liked being next to a graffiti park?

Fast-forward: When I got back to do some more research on the park, turns out Castel Hill Partners own the land, are land developers and are obviously just waiting to develop it.  I could help but wondered why they aren’t worried about the liabilities associated with letting people climb up and down their property. Somebody could easily get hurt and there are no signs saying, “use at your own risk.”

Jackson Pollock & Graffiti Art

Once we reached the edge it wasn’t as dangerous as the fireman suggested, but yes you have to be careful.  The view of the city was spectacular and the park is a kaleidoscope of colour.  It is definitely more of a graffiti park than a street art park as there are only a few areas where an individual artist’s work has been left untouched. Rather it is just layer upon layer of lines, squiggles and words in a cacophony of random colours - a Jackson Pollock-like mega 3D painting.

This was my favourite spot as you could play with the perspective of the window opening in the concrete foundation.

The intensity can be a sight for sore eyes.

Found this young lady hiding in the shadows. One of the few artworks that hadn't been covered with graffiti. 

Perfect place to sit and chat.

Found this artist putting some final touches on his contribution.

Perfect place to meet friends for a picnic.

The Gallery has many walls to create lots of different galleries. Note you can see the castle in at the top in the background.

This is the proper entrance to the Hope Outdoor Gallery on Baylor St. at 11th St. 

Better Than Public Art

I loved the scale, the energy, unique sense of place and randomness of the Hope Outdoor Gallery (HOG). While we were there a street artist was being interviewed about his work, there were lots of people milling about and even friends having a picnic.  We went by the next day which was a Saturday and it was even busier. It is heaven for urban photographers.

HOG is better than most public artworks that quickly become just a part of the urban landscape and ignored by pedestrians. HOG is an ever-changing artwork that challenges people to literally explore it and to participate.  I have now visited three times and each time I have discovered something new and always there are a dozen of so people actively looking at the art and trying to make sense of it. 

I am thinking it would be a wonderful and weird place for wedding pictures. Hey this Austin, I am thinking it has happened more than once.

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Calgary’s Stunning Parkades “Get No Respect”

I kept procrastinating about doing a blog about Calgary’s three unique above-ground parkades for some unknown reason until I saw a blog on

Flipchart entitled, “House of Cars: 8 Stunning Parkade Structure Designs.”

Its first paragraph reads:

“Ever since Miami’s 1111 Lincoln Road, designed by Herzog and de Meuron, put the parking structure on the architectural map, there’s been a steady stream of other projects that elevate the lowly building type. They may not be hosting wedding ceremonies and dinners as 1111 Lincoln Road has, but they still have the visual chops to delight, shock or surprise. We take a look at eight parking structures that are also capable of engaging passersby in dialogue and the key material palettes their architects used. (And you’ll be surprised to know that some of these gems were pre-Lincoln Road.)”

I was aware of the fancy 1111 Lincoln Road parkade and the fanfare it got when it opened in 2010, for its design and because of the world-renowned architectural firm, Herzog and de Meuron, who designed it. Imagine stooping so low as to design a parkade.

A quick flip through the blog and yes, there are some stunning parkades, but Calgary’s Centennial Parkade, Alberta Children’s Hospital Parkade and SAIT Parkade could easily go head-to-head with any of author’s Shelia Kim’s picks.

Read: "House of Cars: 8 Stunning Parkade Structure Designs"

 

This is the stunning, shimmering, facade of the SAIT Parkade that from a distance becomes a huge artwork.

The Ombrae Sky mural on facade of the SAIT parkade. (photo credit Ombrae Studio) 

SAIT Parkade is located next to Calgary C-Train so it is seen by thousands of people everyday. (photo credit: Ombrae Studio) 

SAIT Parkade

To say Vancouver’s Bing Thom Architects and Calgary's MTa (Marshall Tittemore Architects) parkade is a stunning work of art is an understatement.  In fact, the entire east and south façades are actual artworks created by Vancouver artist Roderick Quin.  The metal façade with its thousands of holes resembling opened tabs of a beer can, each strategically punched, create a giant (560 feet long for the east wall and 260 feet for the south wall) artwork titled "The Ombrae Sky" inspired by the dramatic prairie clouds and skies. The artwork not only changes throughout the day with the changing light, but also allows natural light into the parkade.  The star of this show is Quin and his programable Qmbrae sculptural system

The structure is nicely nestled into a hill on campus, allows for the roof to be an artificial turf playing field for SAIT athletes. It also provides a perfect vantage point to view the campus’ signature 1921 Heritage Hall and Calgary’s stunning downtown skyline.

Its two very contemporary glass pyramids thrusting out of the ground serve as access points to the campus from car parkade and also allows more natural light into the parkade.  They create tension, drama and a little playfulness in juxtaposition to the stoic, gothic architectural statement of Heritage Hall.

The parkade won a Mayor's Urban Design Award in 2011 for best urban architecture, it should have also won for best public art. It is a shame most Calgarians have probably never seen the parkade’s artwork (one of Calgary’s best public artworks) or Calgary’s delightful pyramids.

Aerial view of SAIT Parkade with wrap around mural and roof top playing field (photo credit: Bing Thom Architects).

Glass pyramid entrance from campus ground level with Heritage Hall in the background. 

Close up of cloudscape mural from ground level. 

The Ombrae Sky transforms into smoky, burning fire mural at night. (photo credit: Ombrae Studio) 

Centennial Parkade

The common downtown joke back in 1995 when Centennial Parkade was being built was that the City was getting calls from people wanting to rent office space in the new building going up at the along 9th Avenue between 5th and 6th Streets.  It looked good then and still looks good 20 years later – brick is timeless!

Centennial Parkade from across the tracks. 

Centennial Parkade Colonnade is devoid of pedestrians as there is not pedestrian oriented businesses located along it. 

The brick façade give it more of a warehouse or office building look than a parkade.  Not surprising as the design was inspired by the early 20th century brick warehouses that lined the downtown CPR tracks at that time and still be found along 10th Avenue SW. 

Some still call it the Taj Mahal of parkades because instead of being an ugly, bare concrete utilarian structure it makes an positive architectural statement and fits with the history and sense of place next to the Canadian Pacific Railways’ main line.  

Completed in 1996 and designed by Calgary’s Gibbs Gage Architects, today it is home to not only 840 heated parking stalls, but also 17 cows in the Udderly Art Pasture.  What is this you ask?

Back in the year 2,000 one of Calgary’s millennium projects was to create and place 100+ cow sculptures throughout the city, but mostly downtown.  As a legacy to the project, 17 of the cows found a permanent home in the +15 (second floor) walkway along 9th Avenue SW. Accompanied by information panels with fun factoids, photo of all 100+ cows, it is a great place to bring young children.

Read: Udderly Art Pasture Fun

+15 level of the Centennial Parkade is bathed in sunshine in the winter. It is also home to the Udderly Art Pasture. 

Could be better? 

The City has been criticized, for not utilizing the site for something more than just a parkade.  The opportunity for a couple of floors of live/work spaces for artists and entrepreneurs would have certainly help add more life to the block. We weren’t thinking mixed-use as much in the ‘90s as we are today.

And, while attempts were made to create a pedestrian-friendly colonnade along 9th Avenue with street-level retail spaces to animate the street it failed to attract any retailers. So, spaces were quickly converted into the Calgary Parking Authority’s offices, and remain so today.

Oh, and in case somebody thinks this beautiful parkade is a waste of taxpayers’ money, the parkade was paid for by the City’s “cash-lieu-policy.” The policy restricts downtown office developers to building only 50% of the parking requirements under their office towers and mandates them to give the city the cash to pay for the other 50% of the parking requirements in a parkade built and operated by the city.

Centennial Parkade looking west along 9th Avenue. Note the black hole that is the sidewalk colonnade for pedestrian to walk through to the Calgary Parking Authority offices. 

Alberta Children’s Hospital Parkade

Opened in 2006, it is part of the Lego-inspired design of the complex.  (Backstory: There was a children’s advisory group that helped the Calgary design team at Kasian Architecture design the building.  The children said they wanted lots of bold colour and big windows, like something they would create with Lego, and they got it!) 

The huge green parkade (not green because of its environmental features, but that is its colour) is very welcoming and playful with it large yellow and red blocks of colour and huge car graphics on the façade.  Indeed, it is toy-like – even a big SUV or pick-up truck looks like a dinky toy when parked in this mammoth garage. 

Most above-ground suburban parkades are open to the elements but this one is entirely enclosed and heated making it very patient and visitor friendly (for those struggling with strollers, wheelchairs and slow walkers).  Don’t even think about criticizing this upgrading of the basic parkade design standards – the government did not fund it.

Alberta Children's Parkade uses bright colours and lots of large windows to create a cheerful atmosphere. 

On the exterior facade are several very large storybook images of car. 

Inside the parkade warm cheerful colours and children's graphics are employed to create a child-friendly atmosphere. 

This stunning picture window has outstanding views of the downtown skyline and the Rocky Mountains. 

Last Word

When it comes to widespread acknowledgement and recognition for Calgary’s urban design gems – buildings, public art, public spaces, bridges and yes even parkades, the words of the late comedian Rodney Dangerfield come to mind, Calgary “gets no respect.”


2015: Everyday Tourist Best Skyscape photos

Over the past year, I have been treated to some some amazingly works of art created by Mother Nature.  For the most part these are not your romantic sunsets and sunrises, but rather dramatic moments that have been part of my a everyday experiences in 2015.  I hope you find them interesting. 

Stanley Glacier Hike

Fire Sky, my backyard, West Hillhurst, Calgary 

Approaching storm, Altadore, Calgary

Morning Reflection, Elbow River, Calgary

Ripple Clouds, Grand Trunk Park, my front yard, Calgary

Deep Blue Sunset, University District, Calgary

Pink Clouds Over Crowchild Trail, Calgary (my street) 

Spirit Cloud, Redwood Meadows

Wings Over the Bow River, East Village, Calgary

Downtown Heart, Calgary (took this photo for the Hula Girl, only when I got home did I see the heart-shaped cloud)

Exploding Cloud over Grand Trunk Park, Calgary

Morning sky over downtown Calgary, from St. Andrew's Heights 

Chinook Arch, River Park, Calgary 

Burning Morning, Elbow River, Calgary

2015: Everyday Tourist's Best Street People Photos

 

My 2014 Christmas gift to myself was a Sony RX100 camera which, along with two iPhones, were put to good use (some might not agree, particularly my Redwood golfing buddies who were always asking “what are you taking a picture of now?”) last year taking 12,682 photos.

I love surfing through my photos on an almost daily basis. It is like a visual diary of both being both a tourist in other cities and an everyday flaneur in and around Calgary. It is fun reliving and rethinking where you have been.

As 2015 came to a close I started to reflect on the highlights of 2015.  After spending hours reviewing my photos and wondering if I could reduce 2015 to just 10 photos.  (I love top ten lists) I came to the conclusion that was impossible for me. I have never been a good editor. 

I then thought maybe I could do a couple of top ten lists based on certain subjects and activities with some common denominators.  After identifying about 250 favourite images (about 2% of the 2015 portfolio) seven subjects surfaced.

So rather than one large blog with dozen of images, I created seven subject specific blogs that reflect the fun and surprises of being an everyday tourist and flaneur in 2015.  

Black & White Narratives

I was surprised at how many black and white photos I took in 2015 and how many still captured my interest.  There is something about black and white images that elevates the drama of everyday life. While some readers have said the black and white images are depressing and sad, others love the quality of light and sense of the narrative that is revealed in them.

Architecture As Art

My architectural photos rarely isolate a single building into a static documentary image, but rather focus on the interplay of design, styles and built forms.  I am always looking for a different perspective that captures an artistic interpretation of architecture.

Flaneuring Fun

I love wandering the streets wherever I am, looking for urban surprises and usually I am not disappointed.  It could be anything from a dandelion gone to seed illuminated by a setting sun to fun doorway.  I love the thrill of the hunt.

Playgrounds

I have always loved the colour and sense of joy that happens at community playgrounds.  This year I bonded with the little guy next-door (he will be 2 years old in January 2016) and explored literally dozens of playgrounds all within a short walk of our house.  As a result I have made a point over the past year to visit as many playgrounds as I can both in Calgary and beyond.

Street People

One of my goals for 2015 was to capture the everyday urban life of the street, plaza, park and pathway, while respecting everyone’s privacy.

Street Art / Public Art Surprises

Expect the unexpected as my street art and public art photos are not just about sculptures and statues, rather how art can be found in strange places like amazing collages created in the reflections of storefront windows.

Skyscapes

Over the past year, I have been treated to some some amazingly works of art created by Mother Nature.  For the most part these are not your romantic sunsets and sunrises, but rather dramatic moments that are part of one’s everyday experiences.

Last Word

I hope you will enjoy these compilations as much as I have in putting them together.   As always, comments are welcomed.  Feel free to share with me some of your favourite photos of 2015.

Editor’s Note: I will be posting a new 2015 Best Everyday Tourist Photos blog each Sunday beginning January 3rd.

 

Found these two young girls crawling towards me after a Zombie Walk in Mexico City's Revolution Monument Plaza. There parents and they were keen to have me take their picture.  

This little guy caught me by surprise. Mexico City

Love these ladies, Calgary

Found these children using temporary swings under bleachers set up for the World Archery Competition in Mexico City. 

Walking next to the EMP museum designed by architect Frank Gehry is a surreal experience. 

Musician walking to Revolution Subway station in Mexico City.

Hand-holding, Mexico City. 

Beautiful, Mexico City

Relaxing, Mexico City

Asking For Directions, Mexico City

Lunch, Lady of Guadalupe Plaza, Mexico City 

Stampede fun on Stephen Avenue, Calgary

ive

Give Me 10, Crescent Heights Stairs, Calgary

Mirror, Mirror, Freemont Flea Market, Seattle

Hola Hoop

Fun Run, East Village, Calgary

Retro Fun, Pike Market, Seattle

School Trip, +15 bridge, Calgary

Princess, Revolution Monument Plaza, Mexico City

Big Smile, +15 bridge, Centennial Parkade, Calgary

Beauty & The Beast, Mexico City

Three Stooges, Mexico City

Skeleton Boy, Mexico City

Postcards from "Buffalo The Bold"

With the advent of cell phone/camera, I doubt (with the exception of Postcard Willie who has taken the art of postcard writing to a higher level) many of you send postcards to family and friends when travelling anymore. Why would one?

Though postcards are relatively cheap, the postage is not – case in point we paid $3 last year to mail one from Italy to Calgary - and half the time you arrive home before the post card.  It is hard to compete with free and immediate photos and messages via texts, emails, tweets and instagrams. But the problem with these generic images is people glance at them once, often never to be looked at again. On the flipside, the great thing about postcards is they are often kept for months, years and sometimes even decades.  I see my photos as custom postcards, images of the off-the-beaten path, hidden gems we find when prowling the streets and alleys of a cities we visit.

Recently, we had a chance to spend three days in Buffalo, New York. We loved it - especially the history, the architecture, the food, the beer, the art and the renaissance.  There is a unique urbanity to Buffalo that makes it true to itself and not trying to be like everyone else. There is an compelling contrast between the modest working class homes and the majestic mansions, between the brutalist architecture of cement grain elevators and the art deco design of their City Hall. There is subtle boldness to Buffalo’s early 21st century renaissance that it beginning to match the City’s heyday a century ago.

I hope you will enjoy these everyday tourist postcards of “Buffalo The Bold.”

Douglas: Jim Hodges, Look and See, sculpture creates a wonderful Matisse like cut-out abstract shapes of sky, architecture and sculpture. You would love it.  Cheers! R

Charles: WOW, this paper sculpture hangs from the top of one of the abandoned grain elevators. You could easily miss it if you didn't look up. The silo tour was definitely a highlight of our visit. RnB (just found out these are paper gears created by Daniel Seiders a landscape architect for the City of the Night public art show in 2013) 

Mom: You would have loved Henry Hobson Richardson's (father of the Richardsonian Romanesque architectural style) mega state-of-the-art Buffalo State Assylum for the Insane in 1872 and opened in 1880. It is currently being converted into Hotel Henry: Urban Resort Hotel & Conference Centre and Buffalo Architecture Museum. Love Richard

Knox: You would love these canoes by Nancy's Rubins. The real title"Stainless Steel, Aluminum, Monochrome I, Built to Live Anywhere, at Home Here" seems pretentious. Can you say pretentious? Roscoe 

Don: A pay phone as an art gallery with iPad fireplace can be found at Hydraluic Hearth Pizza and Brewery in Larkinville. The food and beer was good too. RW

Ashley:  I think this fun, funky, quirkly Elmwood Laundry would be fun for you and Knox to check out.. R

Judy: Yes there are buffalos in Buffalo, this one is on the iconic Post Office Building. So many great turn of the century buildings. You would love it here.  R

  Chris: The kids would love these bikes.  Buffalo is a great winter city. Everyone loves ice biking at Buffalo's Canalside skating rink - the size of three NHL rinks. They even have a Tim Hortons' across the street. R

Chris: The kids would love these bikes.  Buffalo is a great winter city. Everyone loves ice biking at Buffalo's Canalside skating rink - the size of three NHL rinks. They even have a Tim Hortons' across the street. R

C:  You would love COOCOOU27 salvage warehouse. This postcards says it all...wish you were here. R

Barbara: Loved the Martin House. The celebrated sculpture, Winged Victory of Samothrace, commonly known as the Nike of Samothrace, is a sculpture of the Greek goddess Nike. The statue was a favorite of Frank Lloyd Wright and he used reproductions of it in a number of his buildings including the Martin House in Buffalo. Best Wishes! RW

Ken: Simply amazing. Sol Lewitt's largest scribble drawing title "WALL DRAWING #1268: SCRIBBLES: STAIRCASE (AKAG), CONCEIVED 2006; EXECUTED 2010" encompasses the entire staircase connecting the 1905 and 1962 buildings. It is created entirely by scribble lines. R

David: These ruins from at Riverworks will become the coolest summer patio in 2016. R

Charlie: Gothic City has everything including the bath tub...perfect for your next project. RW

Lawrence: The Pierce Arrow Museum was a great find...loved the playboy car but this hood ornament and hundreds of others made me envious. R

Knox: Now this is a drink! These Labatt Blue Cans are abandoned grain elevator silos 10 storeys tall and are part of Riverworks sports oriented entertainment complex. RW

Tom: Robert Motherwell's Elegy to the Spanish Republic XXXIV is one of many American masterpieces in the Albright Knox Art Gallery's collection. You should get to Buffalo next time you are in Toronto. R

Amy: You would love the acoustics inside the cement silo grain elevators. George: they are a fun place to photograph...wish you both were here. RW

Linda/Charlie: You'd love this porch at Inn Buffalo. You'd love to stay at the Inn, the place oozes history and breakfast is DELICIOUS...RnB

2015: Everyday Tourist Best Flaneuring Photos

My 2014 Christmas gift to myself was a Sony RX100 camera which, along with two iPhones, were put to good use (some might not agree, particularly my Redwood golfing buddies who were always asking “what are you taking a picture of now?”) last year taking 12,682 photos.

I love surfing through my photos on an almost daily basis. It is like a visual diary of both being both a tourist in other cities and an everyday flaneur in and around Calgary. It is fun reliving and rethinking where you have been.

As 2015 came to a close I started to reflect on the highlights of 2015.  After spending hours reviewing my photos and wondering if I could reduce 2015 to just 10 photos.  (I love top ten lists) I came to the conclusion that was impossible for me. I have never been a good editor. 

I then thought maybe I could do a couple of top ten lists based on certain subjects and activities with some common denominators.  After identifying about 250 favourite images (about 2% of the 2015 portfolio) seven subjects surfaced.

So rather than one large blog with dozen of images, I created seven subject specific blogs that reflect the fun and surprises of being an everyday tourist and flaneur in 2015.  

Black & White Narratives

I was surprised at how many black and white photos I took in 2015 and how many still captured my interest.  There is something about black and white images that elevates the drama of everyday life. While some readers have said the black and white images are depressing and sad, others love the quality of light and sense of the narrative that is revealed in them.

Architecture As Art

My architectural photos rarely isolate a single building into a static documentary image, but rather focus on the interplay of design, styles and built forms.  I am always looking for a different perspective that captures an artistic interpretation of architecture.

Flaneuring Fun

I love wandering the streets wherever I am, looking for urban surprises and usually I am not disappointed.  It could be anything from a dandelion gone to seed illuminated by a setting sun to fun doorway.  I love the thrill of the hunt.

Playgrounds

I have always loved the colour and sense of joy that happens at community playgrounds.  This year I bonded with the little guy next-door (he will be 2 years old in January 2016) and explored literally dozens of playgrounds all within a short walk of our house.  As a result I have made a point over the past year to visit as many playgrounds as I can both in Calgary and beyond.

Street People

One of my goals for 2015 was to capture the everyday urban life of the street, plaza, park and pathway, while respecting everyone’s privacy.

Street Art / Public Art Surprises

Expect the unexpected as my street art and public art photos are not just about sculptures and statues, rather how art can be found in strange places like amazing collages created in the reflections of storefront windows.

Skyscapes

Over the past year, I have been treated to some some amazingly works of art created by Mother Nature.  For the most part these are not your romantic sunsets and sunrises, but rather dramatic moments that are part of one’s everyday experiences.

Last Word

I hope you will enjoy these compilations as much as I have in putting them together.   As always, comments are welcomed.  Feel free to share with me some of your favourite photos of 2015.

Editor’s Note: I will be posting a new 2015 Best Everyday Tourist Photos blog each Sunday beginning January 3rd.

 

This is the entrance to the Pixel condominiums in Sunnyside, Calgary. Very cool!

Exquisite Form collage found at the Fremont Sunday Flea Market in Seattle.  Highly recommended if you are in Seattle on a Sunday.

Loved the juxtaposition of the modern spirit figure workart and the old church in Mexico City. The ironic thing was I had seen the artwork in the alley next to the Toy Museum in another part of the city the day before. 

Found this lovely green trail in the playing field in Calgary's Parkdale community.  It was a great summer evening flaneur as we also found the outdoor hockey rink had been converted to a beach volley ball pitch, a new community garden had been created next to the community centre and a local gardener invited us to inspect his backyard garden.  Flavouring doesn't get any better than that. 

Found these Christmas lights in Briar Hill...never did get to see them on at night. 

Found this lovely green beach along the Elbow River in Calgary's Stanley Park community. 

Loved the evening light on the overgrown stairs going up to the front entrance of a home in Calgary's Hounsfield Heights community. 

I am fascinated by the names of mid-century condos in Calgary's inner-city communities.  This might just be the best one, found in Sunalta.  Whycocomah is Scottish and three is a rural community in Nova Scotia with the same name next to the We'koqma'q First Nations community. 

Found some amazing gardens in Port Angeles walking back from their Art Park. 

There was a wonderful tranquility around this spiral of rock on the huge gravel bar at next to the busy Memorial Drive and Crowchild Trail intersection. 

Found this happy fence, when taking Rossi for a walk in the River Park dog park. 

Found this Bow River fisherman in a suit and tie one Sunday afternoon. 

The Elbow River looked like it was on fire on morning when walking Rossi along the ridge at River Park dog park. 

I love finding art in strange places. This is close up of a mural painting on the wall on the second floor of the Interfaith Furniture Store. 

Found these in the field that will soon be Calgary's newest inner-city community - University District.  Looks like someone has already moved in. 

This sunset dandelion just appeared to me as we were walking along the streets of West Hillhurst, Calgary. 

Found this flower sculpture in a garden along one of our summer evening walks. 

2015: Everyday Tourist Best Architectural Photos

My 2014 Christmas gift to myself was a Sony RX100 camera which, along with two iPhones, were put to good use (some might not agree, particularly my Redwood golfing buddies who were always asking “what are you taking a picture of now?”) last year taking 12,682 photos.

I love surfing through my photos on an almost daily basis. It is like a visual diary of both being both a tourist in other cities and an everyday flaneur in and around Calgary. It is fun reliving and rethinking where you have been.

As 2015 came to a close I started to reflect on the highlights of 2015.  After spending hours reviewing my photos and wondering if I could reduce 2015 to just 10 photos.  (I love top ten lists) I came to the conclusion that was impossible for me. I have never been a good editor. 

I then thought maybe I could do a couple of top ten lists based on certain subjects and activities with some common denominators.  After identifying about 250 favourite images (about 2% of the 2015 portfolio) seven subjects surfaced.

So rather than one large blog with dozen of images, I created seven subject specific blogs that reflect the fun and surprises of being an everyday tourist and flaneur in 2015.  

Black & White Narratives

I was surprised at how many black and white photos I took in 2015 and how many still captured my interest.  There is something about black and white images that elevates the drama of everyday life. While some readers have said the black and white images are depressing and sad, others love the quality of light and sense of the narrative that is revealed in them.

Architecture As Art

My architectural photos rarely isolate a single building into a static documentary image, but rather focus on the interplay of design, styles and built forms.  I am always looking for a different perspective that captures an artistic interpretation of architecture.

Flaneuring Fun

I love wandering the streets wherever I am, looking for urban surprises and usually I am not disappointed.  It could be anything from a dandelion gone to seed illuminated by a setting sun to fun doorway.  I love the thrill of the hunt.

Playgrounds

I have always loved the colour and sense of joy that happens at community playgrounds.  This year I bonded with the little guy next-door (he will be 2 years old in January 2016) and explored literally dozens of playgrounds all within a short walk of our house.  As a result I have made a point over the past year to visit as many playgrounds as I can both in Calgary and beyond.

Street People

One of my goals for 2015 was to capture the everyday urban life of the street, plaza, park and pathway, while respecting everyone’s privacy.

Street Art / Public Art Surprises

Expect the unexpected as my street art and public art photos are not just about sculptures and statues, rather how art can be found in strange places like amazing collages created in the reflections of storefront windows.

Skyscapes

Over the past year, I have been treated to some some amazingly works of art created by Mother Nature.  For the most part these are not your romantic sunsets and sunrises, but rather dramatic moments that are part of one’s everyday experiences.

Last Word

I hope you will enjoy these compilations as much as I have in putting them together.   As always, comments are welcomed.  Feel free to share with me some of your favourite photos of 2015.

Editor’s Note: I will be posting a new 2015 Best Everyday Tourist Photos blog each Sunday beginning January 3rd.

 

"Looking Up" (Revolution Plaza Monument, Mexico City) 

"Strange Reflections" (pedestrian bridge, East Village, Calgary)

"Peace" (Bow River, Calgary)

"True Skyscraper" (Eight Avenue Place, Calgary)

"Skin" (Southern Alberta Institute of Technology Parkade, Calgary)

"Hex" (Soumaya Museum, Mexico City)

"Folds" (Experience Music Museum, Seattle)

"Torre BBVA Bancomer Tower" (Mexico City) 

Close up of the outdoor garden of the Torre BBVA Bancomer office tower. 

Balcony (condo on Paseo de la Reforma, Mexico City)

Skylight, Mexico City 

"Plensa playing with Foster" (Wonderland sculpture and Bow office tower, downtown, Calgary)

"Second Street Collage" (downtown, Calgary)

"Chinese Kaleidoscope" (Chinese Cultural Centre, Calgary)

"Many Angles" (downtown, Calgary)

"Connectivity" (Washington State Convention Centre, Seattle)

"Blue Skying" (Bankers Hall, Calgary) 

"Glass Ceiling" (The Core, Calgary) 

"Ivory Tower" (downtown Calgary)

"9th Avenue Collage" (downtown, Calgary)

"Pick-up sticks", (Seton, Calgary) 

"Old & New" Southern Alberta Institute of Technology, Calgary

2015: Everyday Tourist's Best B&W Photos

My 2014 Christmas gift to myself was a Sony RX100 camera which, along with two iPhones, were put to good use (some might not agree, particularly my Redwood golfing buddies who were always asking “what are you taking a picture of now?”) last year taking 12,682 photos.

I love surfing through my photos on an almost daily basis. It is like a visual diary of both being both a tourist in other cities and an everyday flaneur in and around Calgary. It is fun reliving and rethinking where you have been.

As 2015 came to a close I started to reflect on the highlights of 2015.  After spending hours reviewing my photos and wondering if I could reduce 2015 to just 10 photos.  (I love top ten lists) I came to the conclusion that was impossible for me. I have never been a good editor. 

I then thought maybe I could do a couple of top ten lists based on certain subjects and activities with some common denominators.  After identifying about 250 favourite images (about 2% of the 2015 portfolio) seven subjects surfaced.

So rather than one large blog with dozen of images, I created seven subject specific blogs that reflect the fun and surprises of being an everyday tourist and flaneur in 2015.  

Black & White Narratives

I was surprised at how many black and white photos I took in 2015 and how many still captured my interest.  There is something about black and white images that elevates the drama of everyday life. While some readers have said the black and white images are depressing and sad, others love the quality of light and sense of the narrative that is revealed in them.

Architecture As Art

My architectural photos rarely isolate a single building into a static documentary image, but rather focus on the interplay of design, styles and built forms.  I am always looking for a different perspective that captures an artistic interpretation of architecture.

Flaneuring Fun

I love wandering the streets wherever I am, looking for urban surprises and usually I am not disappointed.  It could be anything from a dandelion gone to seed illuminated by a setting sun to fun doorway.  I love the thrill of the hunt.

Playgrounds

I have always loved the colour and sense of joy that happens at community playgrounds.  This year I bonded with the little guy next-door (he will be 2 years old in January 2016) and explored literally dozens of playgrounds all within a short walk of our house.  As a result I have made a point over the past year to visit as many playgrounds as I can both in Calgary and beyond.

Street People

One of my goals for 2015 was to capture the everyday urban life of the street, plaza, park and pathway, while respecting everyone’s privacy.

Street Art / Public Art Surprises

Expect the unexpected as my street art and public art photos are not just about sculptures and statues, rather how art can be found in strange places like amazing collages created in the reflections of storefront windows.

Skyscapes

Over the past year, I have been treated to some some amazingly works of art created by Mother Nature.  For the most part these are not your romantic sunsets and sunrises, but rather dramatic moments that are part of one’s everyday experiences.

Last Word

I hope you will enjoy these compilations as much as I have in putting them together.   As always, comments are welcomed.  Feel free to share with me some of your favourite photos of 2015.

Editor’s Note: I will be posting a new 2015 Best Everyday Tourist Photos blog each Sunday beginning January 3rd.

 

"Laughter" (church courtyard, Mexico City)

"Morning Shadows" (downtown Calgary)

"Waterfall" (Anthropology Museum courtyard, Mexico City) 

"Divine Light" (cemetery, Mexico City) 

"Mystery Spaces" (lobby Bellas Artes, Mexico City)

"Careful" (Mexico City) 

"Revelation" (Library, Mexico City) 

"Looking Away" (Starbucks Reserve Roastery and Tasting Room, Seattle)

"Ripples" (Redwood Meadows)

"Serenity" (Redwood Meadows)

"Lines" (Soumaya Museum, Mexico City) 

"Scribble" (our garden)

"Crumbling" (4th street underpass, downtown Calgary)

"Staring" (Bankers Hall Plaza, Calgary)

"Stacks" (Seattle Central Library)

"Spikes" (St. James Cathedral, Seattle) 

"Intersection" (downtown Seattle)

"Readers" (Paseo de la Reforma, Mexico City) 

  "Alone" (+15 bridge, downtown Calgary)

"Alone" (+15 bridge, downtown Calgary)

"End of the rails" (Inglewood, Calgary)