FFQing in Montreal

Regular Everyday Tourist readers know FFQ stands for "fun, funky and quirky"and FFQing is the art of looking for FFQ things to see and do in a city, town or village.  We have been in Montreal for just a week now and already we have a good list of FFQ things for visitors.  

These images also serve a fun postcards of everyday Montreal and the text tells some interesting Montreal stories.  

  You have to admit this is fun, funky and quirky.  Found this black and white carport artwork while wandering along Boulevard St. Laurent aka The Main (because it is Main Street and divides the city into east and west). The Main is full of fun murals in the alleys and on the side of buildings at street corners.  It makes this street a fun place to flaneur. You can find this garage at 4866 St. Laurent.

You have to admit this is fun, funky and quirky.  Found this black and white carport artwork while wandering along Boulevard St. Laurent aka The Main (because it is Main Street and divides the city into east and west). The Main is full of fun murals in the alleys and on the side of buildings at street corners.  It makes this street a fun place to flaneur. You can find this garage at 4866 St. Laurent.

  Jean Toss: Yes that is a pair of jeans (look at the top of the photo near the pillar) being tossed by staff at Jeans Jeans Jeans from a rack on the other side of the store to the fitting area. It is better than the fish toss at Seattle's Pike Market. Go on Saturday afternoon and you won't be disappointed. See video below.

Jean Toss: Yes that is a pair of jeans (look at the top of the photo near the pillar) being tossed by staff at Jeans Jeans Jeans from a rack on the other side of the store to the fitting area. It is better than the fish toss at Seattle's Pike Market. Go on Saturday afternoon and you won't be disappointed. See video below.

Captured this surreal light show at south-west entrance of the Montreal Convention Centre. The sun shining through the building's coloured glass facade created a wonderful mosaic on the escalator, steps, walls and floor inside the building. It is like walking into a stain glass window.

  This is a close-up of the Olympic Torch sculpture on the plaza in front of the offices of the Canadian Olympic headquarters.  The yellow and orange colours dance like a flame and the stainless steel reflects the street life to create a fun artwork that works well both day and night. IMHO

This is a close-up of the Olympic Torch sculpture on the plaza in front of the offices of the Canadian Olympic headquarters.  The yellow and orange colours dance like a flame and the stainless steel reflects the street life to create a fun artwork that works well both day and night. IMHO

  Stumbled upon a fun Barbie Doll exhibition in Montreal's Underground City. There were hundreds of dolls with designer clothes in display cases on the walls, as well as several fun vignettes, like this   fashion   show which was animated with models on runway and flashing cameras in the audience. See video below. The noise you hear is the fountain in the middle of the exhibition space.

Stumbled upon a fun Barbie Doll exhibition in Montreal's Underground City. There were hundreds of dolls with designer clothes in display cases on the walls, as well as several fun vignettes, like this fashion show which was animated with models on runway and flashing cameras in the audience. See video below. The noise you hear is the fountain in the middle of the exhibition space.

  If you are in Montreal, you have to go to a Cirque du Soleil show.  We caught the OVO show at the Bell Centre - it was a wonderful smash-up of ballet, gymnastics, circus, music and visual arts .  Fun entertainment for everyone!

If you are in Montreal, you have to go to a Cirque du Soleil show.  We caught the OVO show at the Bell Centre - it was a wonderful smash-up of ballet, gymnastics, circus, music and visual arts. Fun entertainment for everyone!

  Walking home one night discovered this quirky roof top artwork? patio? 

Walking home one night discovered this quirky roof top artwork? patio? 

  Ecole de technologie Superieure's (ETS) funky campus is located in Griffintown just west of the downtown core. One of the buildings has a very strange and subtle white on white design best seen from across the street. I took this b&w photo to try and capture it.  Planning to revisit and see if I can do a walkabout inside.   Click Here For More Info.

Ecole de technologie Superieure's (ETS) funky campus is located in Griffintown just west of the downtown core. One of the buildings has a very strange and subtle white on white design best seen from across the street. I took this b&w photo to try and capture it.  Planning to revisit and see if I can do a walkabout inside.  Click Here For More Info.

  Chabanel Street was once home to Montreal's bustling garment district. Today there are still many wholesalers who have showrooms there and on Saturdays some of them are open to the public.  It is a fun place to wander as you never know what you will find.  We got to see some of the Fall 2017 lines before the buyers did and heard stories of the good old days.  We also discovered this ghostly fashion show of mannequins in one of the empty spaces. 

Chabanel Street was once home to Montreal's bustling garment district. Today there are still many wholesalers who have showrooms there and on Saturdays some of them are open to the public.  It is a fun place to wander as you never know what you will find.  We got to see some of the Fall 2017 lines before the buyers did and heard stories of the good old days.  We also discovered this ghostly fashion show of mannequins in one of the empty spaces. 

  These urban igloos were a quirky surprise. Turns out everyone on this street of row houses has white plastic carports.  I am guessing it is winter adaptation due to the fact Montreal gets lots of snow. I sure hope they remove them after winter!

These urban igloos were a quirky surprise. Turns out everyone on this street of row houses has white plastic carports.  I am guessing it is winter adaptation due to the fact Montreal gets lots of snow. I sure hope they remove them after winter!

  This is another of Montreal's amazing public spaces that uses light and colour to create wonderful pedestrian experiences.  This is at the Place des Art. 

This is another of Montreal's amazing public spaces that uses light and colour to create wonderful pedestrian experiences.  This is at the Place des Art. 

  A remnant of the Berlin Wall, is on permanent display in the middle of the Ruelle des Fortifications in the lobby of the Montreal World Trade Center building. The lobby is located on the former site of Montreal's walled fortifications which were built in 1717 and demolished between 1804 and 1812.     The fragment, donated to the City of Montréal by the City of Berlin to commemorate Montréal’s 350th anniversary, is a testament to Berlin's return to the community of free cities after the fall of the Wall on November 9, 1989.

A remnant of the Berlin Wall, is on permanent display in the middle of the Ruelle des Fortifications in the lobby of the Montreal World Trade Center building. The lobby is located on the former site of Montreal's walled fortifications which were built in 1717 and demolished between 1804 and 1812. 

The fragment, donated to the City of Montréal by the City of Berlin to commemorate Montréal’s 350th anniversary, is a testament to Berlin's return to the community of free cities after the fall of the Wall on November 9, 1989.

  This is not Montreal's "Red Light District." In several places we encountered red lights from buildings shining on the sidewalk creating a fun (and warm) pedestrian experience. I am interested in seeing how it works in the snow. 

This is not Montreal's "Red Light District." In several places we encountered red lights from buildings shining on the sidewalk creating a fun (and warm) pedestrian experience. I am interested in seeing how it works in the snow. 

This wall of blue lights changes colours as pedestrians walk by SAT (Societe des Art Technologiques) building.  It serves as funky window covering to give some privacy to those working inside the school while also enhancing the pedestrian experience.  How cool is that?

 Found these "pom pom" ladies creating a playful window display along Boulevard St. Laurent. 

Found these "pom pom" ladies creating a playful window display along Boulevard St. Laurent. 

  This is the hallway to the elevators at Place Ville Marie to their Observation Deck on the 44/45/46 floors.  It is literally like walking into a geometric painting. FFQ for sure!

This is the hallway to the elevators at Place Ville Marie to their Observation Deck on the 44/45/46 floors.  It is literally like walking into a geometric painting. FFQ for sure!

  This was lucky find! It was in a restaurant under construction in Little Burgundy.  I was stopped in my tracks by two guys carrying in a huge mirror from the street. I couldn't resist looking inside and this is what I found.  Wasn't that a party?

This was lucky find! It was in a restaurant under construction in Little Burgundy.  I was stopped in my tracks by two guys carrying in a huge mirror from the street. I couldn't resist looking inside and this is what I found.  Wasn't that a party?

  I am astounded at the number of contemporary art galleries in Montreal. And they are everywhere, not just in the City Centre - Old Montreal, Little Burgundy, St Laurent, Rue St. Hubert, Plateau and Miles End. 

I am astounded at the number of contemporary art galleries in Montreal. And they are everywhere, not just in the City Centre - Old Montreal, Little Burgundy, St Laurent, Rue St. Hubert, Plateau and Miles End. 

Last Word

And this was after only five days? Montreal is very fun, very funky and very quirky! My kind of town!

If you like this blog, you will like:

FFQing in Colorado Springs 

FFQing in Washington's Tri-Cities

FFQing in Calgary's Udderly Art Pasture 

Calgary: Field of Crosses

Great cities have great visionaries.  Drive along Calgary’s Memorial Drive or by Memorial Park on 12th Avenue SW and you realize Calgary has benefitted in many ways from its early 20th century visionaries. A hundred years later today's visionaries are building on their vision. 

Calgary loves to celebrate its history?

Too often Calgary has been and is criticized for not preserving and celebrating its history.  Yet, when it comes to war memorials, we have done more than our fair share, including being home to the second largest War Museum in Canada.

What sparked this blog was the annual “Field of Crosses” that sprouted up last week along Memorial Drive almost like magic.

It is one of the most recent additions to Calgary’s evolving Memorial Drive which has payed tribute to the men and women of the Calgary region who have fought in various wars over the past 100 years. It first started with planting of trees and continues with the temporary placement of 3,200 crosses, each bearing the name of a fallen soldier from Southern Alberta.  

The crosses, lined up row-by-row, create our own “Flanders Field.” 

Link: Calgary: History Capital of Canada?

The crosses are planted in an unused patch of grass along Memorial Drive just west of the historic Centre Street Bridge on November 1st each year leading up to Remembrance Day (November 11th). Like an annual art installation the white crosses with red poppies and Canadian Flags (there are also a few American flags) weave their way along the narrow grassy field like military regiments on a maneuver. 

It dramatically changes the Memorial Drive experience.

Over the 11-day period, over 10,000 people will visit the site to pay their respects. On the afternoon I was there, there were about 100 people milling around including a busload of junior high students. - all were very respectful.

The “Field of Crosses” was the vision of Murray McCann a prominent Calgary businessman who witnessed something similar along a USA highway.  An epiphany for him - he was so overwhelmed he had to pull over and stop.

With the help of a $100,000 contribution by the McCann Family Foundation and with tremendous support from the City of Calgary Parks department and hundreds of volunteers his vision of a Field of Cross in Calgary was realized in 2009 and every year since.

"The City annually makes the park available across the Bow River from Calgary’s dynamic downtown.  The Field of Crosses committee prepares the park for housing over 3,200 crosses during the month of October and up to November 12th when the crosses are removed.  All city departments, which are impacted, have been super cooperative and supportive of the Field of Crosses project.  This demonstrates their recognition and appreciation of the role the military played in allowing us to live the lives we live today," says Susan Schalin with the McCann Family Foundation.

A Brief History of Memorial Drive

After the First World War the City of Calgary decided to plant a tree for each fallen soldier along Sunnyside Boulevard (now Memorial Drive). The first trees were planted on May 11, 1922 by Mayor Samuel Adams.  The planting continued until 1928, creating a spectacular boulevard with a grand total of 3,278 trees as living legacy. 

  It is hard to believe that this was Memorial Drive a one time. 

It is hard to believe that this was Memorial Drive a one time. 

Backstory: Many of the poplar trees (Populus Wobbstii) that now line Memorial Drive are nearing the end of their life cycle. However, the City has been taking cuttings from the original trees and today more than 1,500 offspring are growing in Grand Forks, BC to be used as part of a regeneration program. The original trees are thought to have come from Drumheller to Calgary by miners. It is hard to believe that Calgary was once almost treeless. All of the trees but one along Memorial Drive are female (female poplars bear the cotton which provides food for ducks, carries seeds and provides nesting material for birds and animals along the river.

Mega Facelift

Memorial Drive got a mega facelift in 2010, with new planters in the median to allow for more trees and poppies and decorative lampposts and banners. In 2011, The Calgary Soldiers’ Memorial designed by Calgary’s Marc Boutin Architectural Collaborative was unveiled a few blocks west of 10th Street next to the Bow River. It lists the names of over 3,000 soldiers who died in various wars and conflicts on massive white marble slabs thrusting out of ground.   Illuminated from below, at night the memorial becomes a to pensive, eye-catching sculpture.

The Calgary Soldiers' Memorial

Poppy Plaza located along Memorial Drive at 10th St. NW is another Boutin design.  It is dominated by two menacing-looking rusted steel sculptural shapes (some say bomb-like) and eight large letters that spell “MEMORIAL.”  Quotes about war are water jet cut into the steel and backlit to remind visitors of the hopes and sacrifices involved in wartime activities. There are also two illuminated sentinels the Bow River on the south bank, which at night shimmer on the endlessly moving Bow River suggesting a connection with the constant movement of time.

Poppy Plaza driving east along Memorial Drive. 

Collectively the war memorial elements along Memorial Drive are called “Landscape of Memory,” a City of Calgary project funded by the ENMAX Legacy Parks Fund.  

Last Word

To me, the “Field of Crosses” is not only a memorial but a very significant piece of public art as it is so visual (public art doesn’t have to be permanent). This is the kind of meaningful public art we should foster - something that captures the public’s attention and motivates them to come and see it again and again.  Something that clearly speaks to the public rather than being obtuse.

Perhaps one of the keys to help accomplish this is to make public art more of an event; something temporary, a pop-up exhibition, so there is an urgency to come and see it before it gets taken away.

  Geroge V. Bittman bench sits in the trees above the field offers a pensive place to reflect on the Field of Crosses and what they mean. He was co-creator and chairman of the Memorial Drive "Field of Crosses" project.  He died in 2011.  

Geroge V. Bittman bench sits in the trees above the field offers a pensive place to reflect on the Field of Crosses and what they mean. He was co-creator and chairman of the Memorial Drive "Field of Crosses" project.  He died in 2011. 

Wouldn’t it be lovely too if the “Field of Crosses” become the catalyst to create more ways to celebrate our history?  Perhaps it will inspire someone creative way to celebrate Calgary’s tremendous "sense of community" with an annual flood memorial each June in memory of great floods of Calgary?

If you like this blog, you will like:

Calgary Military Museums: A Must Visit

Putting the public into public art

Poppy Plaza Revisited

BL writes: "Excellent blog Richard. We arrived back in the desert last night and took a taxi home, about ten minutes. Most of the drive is through Cathedral City, the mostly Hispanic bedroom community between Palm Springs and Rancho Mirage. Along the roadside they have a flag display every year in memory of the young kids from Cathedral City who gave their lives for "their" country. It is a shame that most of these kids came from the families of illegal immigrants and the number of Hispanics is unusually high because the Hispanic army units are given some of the highest risk assignments. Sobering when you drive by."

Calgary vs Austin / 17th Ave vs South Congress

Great cities have signature streets that capture the imagination of tourists from around the world.  Austin's signature street is South Congress in Calgary it is still up for grabs. This blog compares Calgary's 17th Avenue with Austin's South Congress as a tourist attraction. 

 

Calgary's 17th Avenue 10 blocks south of downtown is a quirky mix of restaurants, cafes and shops. 

To some, the 17th Ave SW shopping and dining corridor (2nd to 14th St. SW) is still Uptown 17, while to others it is the Red Mile and yet others (specifically the 17th Avenue BRZ), it is RED (Retail Entertainment District).  For many Calgarians, the heyday of 17th Avenue was during the 2004 Calgary Flames Stanley Cup playoff run when tens of thousands of Calgarians took over the street after every game.  The impromptu street festivals captured national and international media attention, creating an image of Calgary as a fun city. 

Austin's South Congress Avenue looking north to downtown is a major highway. 

But after the Flames lost in the Stanley Cup finals, 17th Avenue has never really been able to capitalize on the opportunity of becoming one of the great urban streets of  North America. Melrose Sports Bar, the epicenter of the Red Mile, closed in January 2014 after 23 years of operation.  It has recently opened with much fanfare as Trolley 5 Restaurant & Brewery. 

Today, 17th Avenue struggles with its branding.  Is it a restaurant row? Absolutely. It is home to Pigeon Hole, #1 in enRoute Magazine’s Canada’s Best New Restaurants (2015) and Model Milk #2 (2012). It has also become a very popular destination for pizza lovers with restaurants like Una and Cibo.

Calgary's 17th Avenue has a vibrant cafe culture. 

Is it a shopping street? Indeed. Some long-standing destination retailers include Rubiayat, gravitypope (love the new space), Reid’s Stationary and Purr, as well as two of Calgary’s best optical boutiques - Eye Candy and Brass Monocle.   Newer additions include West Elm, Modern Duke, Structube, Steelng Home and Kit and Ace.

17th Avenue's gravitypope shop is dazzling. 

Both 17th Ave and South Congress have fun candy stores....this is 17th Ave's!

Both streets have quirky retail shops...this is one of the Rubiayat's many display cabinets with unique curiosities, home decor and collectables. 

Entertainment a key element for tourists

Is it an entertainment district? In my opinion, a resounding, “No!”  There are no cinemas, no theatres and no performing arts centres. The only live music venue of any renown is the Ship & Anchor Pub.  

When I think of “entertainment,” I think of more than shopping, drinking and dining, I also think of sidewalks full of people, buskers, lots of street vendors and food trucks. This is exactly what we experienced along South Congress Avenue in Austin earlier this year with its Stampede-like atmosphere on weekends as well as Thursday and Friday evenings, despite there being nothing special happening.

Calgary's 17th Avenue has vibrant patio culture. 

Physically, South Congress Ave and 17th Ave are very similar. Both area about a 10-minute walk from downtown. Both are a mix of retail and restaurants about 10 blocks long with lots of patios. However, this is where the similarities end.

Shortly after I got back from Austin, I made a point of visiting 17th Avenue on a nice spring Saturday to check out the action. Yes, there were people on the sidewalk but it was hardly the lively impromptu street festival atmosphere experienced on South Congress.

South Congress Avenue's sidewalks on Saturday afternoon have a festival-like atmosphere.

South Congress has numerous outdoor live music spots that open out to the sidewalk. 

South Congress' corners are animated on Saturday afternoon. On the opposite corner is a lively food truck hub. 

We loved this busker on South Congress who would create a poem on the spot based on the subject of your choice.  We had him create a poem about thrifting...we loved it. 

17th Avenue's Tomkins Park on Saturday afternoon is too often devoid of any vitality. 

Creating Vitality

Firstly, there is a greater sense of spontaneity about South Congress, with buskers performing day and night.  What would be surface parking lots in Calgary were Food Truck lots in Austin. There is even an artisan market on a parking lot one night a week. And the patios are more animated, several offering live outdoor music.  

Speaking of music, the biggest difference between the two streets is that South Congress has several live music venues (indoor and outdoor) that add an additional element of entertainment. Live music is everywhere in Austin, including the airport lobby. Branding the city as the “Live Music Capital of the World” is very appropriate.

The Continental Club one of Austin's iconic live music venues is located on South Congress. 

A third difference is there are few financial institutions on South Congress, while 17th Avenue seems to have one on every corner.  Banks on corners are urban vitality killers – they do nothing to add to the street vitality. I realize they are prepared to pay the high rent for the corner visibility so landlords are quick to lease to them. Perhaps we need a bylaw that prevents (or limits) banks from leasing corners on pedestrian-oriented streets as part of Calgary’s new Main Streets program.  

Too many of 17th Avenue's corners are taken up by financial institutions which create no sidewalk vitality.

ATB Financial, 17th  Ave Calgary

Who needs density?

Something else struck me as unusual on South Congress – there were no highrise condos anywhere nearby.  No mid-rise condos either for that matter.

We are lead to believe by urban planners that density is the key to creating 18/7 urban vitality, yet South Congress is thriving without any significant infill projects.

17th Avenue on the other hand has numerous highrise and midrise infill condos completed over the past few years with more to come. It has also seen numerous new and renovated retail spaces open up, attracting new retailers like West Elm and Best Buy.  It will be interesting to see what impact Embassy BOSA’s new 34-storey Royal tower (223 upscale condos) with an Urban Fare grocery store at street level and second floor Canadian Tire when it opens in 2018.  

FYI: I was hoping for a cinema complex as part of the Royal development.

Calgary's 17th Avenue has several highrise condo towers, while Austin's South Congress has none. 

Streetscape Improvements

What I also found interesting is that South Congress has no significant streetscape improvements or beautification initiatives.  There were no street banners, no fancy benches and few bike racks.  The sidewalks were adequate but nothing special and it certainly isn’t a tree-lined boulevard.  In fact, it is an old fashioned, much maligned six-lane highway.  Yet, at the same time, it remains a vibrant pedestrian street. 

Neither is there a park or plaza space on South Congress for people to gather or events to take place. It has nothing to match 17th Ave’s Tomkins Park and certainly nothing like 17th Ave’s high-tech public washroom installed in the park in 2008 that attracts over 40,000 “visitors” a year.

Calgary’s 17th Avenue is currently receiving a major upgrade - new sidewalks, buried power lines, new LED streetlights, more trees and crosswalks.  While these changes will enhance the 17th Avenue experience I am not convinced they will add significantly to its vitality.  What is really needed is more entertainment – music, theatre, comedy club and cinema venues. 

Last Word

Whatever you call it - Uptown 17, Red Mile or RED – Calgary’s 17th Avenue has many of the ingredients needed to become one of North America’s BoBo (bohemian and bourgeois) streets. It has the “rich and famous” living near by in Mount Royal and the “young and restless” living in the Beltline.  It has a good mix of retail and restaurants too. But what it lacks is the 18/7 street animation and entertainment venues to become a tourist attraction like South Congress in Austin.

Note: An edited version of this blog was published in the Calgary Herald, titled "17th Avenue Needs An Entertainment Scene" on September 24, 2016

If you like this blog, you will like:

Austin vs Calgary: Sister Cities?

RED: Calgary's Urban Playground

The importance of the public realm!

Calgary's 7th Avenue: Good but not great!

Calgary: Old Bridges Get No Respect

Regular readers of the Everyday Tourist blog will know that I love bridges. This past summer I have developed an appreciation for two of Calgary’s older pedestrian bridges that don’t get the respect they deserve.

The Edworthy Bridge (whoops Boothman) has a unique design with huge holes that over a great place to view the Bow River. 

Bridge with big holes?

Even if you are a long-time Calgarian, I bet you have never heard of the Harry Boothman Bridge. I hadn’t until I researched on the bridge that connects Parkdale with Edworthy Park, which I had always heard of as the Edworthy Bridge. Logical.

The Boothman Bridge has a wonderful sense of passage created by the middle circle that frames the bridge's entrance.  The top circle frames Calgary's wonderful celestial blue sky. 

Calgarians from all walks of life use the Boothman bridge. 

It turns out it is named after a Calgary Park Supervisor and was built in 1976, but that is where the information ends.  I checked with the City of Calgary and they have no information on Boothman, the cost of the bridge or who designed it. The Glenbow archives has a photo but no other information on the bridge. Amazing!

Every time I visited the bridge this year it was packed with people (I must confess, my visits were mostly on weekends). In fact, it seemed busier than either the Peace Bridge (between Prince’s Island and Sunnyside) or the King Bridge (between East Village and St. Patrick’s Island). 

On the southside the bridge lands at a huge picnic area that is busy even in early spring. This photo was take April 3, 2016. 

However, I was told by the City that is not true - Peace Bridge gets about 4,500 trips per day in the summer, King gets 2,200 and Boothman 1,600. 

I can’t help but wonder what the public’s response was to the bridge in the ‘70s as it was a key link in the early development of Calgary’s Bow River pathways system.  Was there a controversy over the cost and design?  I highly doubt there was an international design competition.  I wonder what people thought of the concrete bridge’s design with the big holes.  I guess we will never know?

On the north side the bridge lands at a popular cafe and a sunny spot for buskers.  

Editor's Note:

After this blog was published Everyday Tourist loyal reader B. Lester wrote to say: 

The designers of the Boothman Bridge were Simpson Lester Goodrich; my old firm. We also designed the Carburn Park  pedestrian bridge (still my favorite; have a good look the next time you are in the area of Deerfoot and Southland Drive); the Crowchild Trail pedestrian bridge at McMahan Stadium (the vibrations caused by the crowds of football fans are always a subject of some awe as the crowds pass over before and after every game); and the Deerfoot Trail pedestrian Bridge near Fox Hollow.
The challenge for pedestrian bridge designers in the "old" days was to create an interesting landmark on a very tight budget. City administrators in those days were willing to consider interesting designs, but only if they cost no more than a bare bones solution. Our view was that crossing a bridge should be an "event" in itself and we struggled to come up with solutions which would create identifiable landmarks without spending additional public dollars.

I wrote back and asked for more in formation on the rationale for the design and cost and quickly received the following info.

 

The Boothman bridge was designed back in the '70's in the days of peace, love, and rock 'n roll. It was the fledgling days of the back to the earth movement with geodesic domes and round bird's eye windows. The holes in the bridge were reflective of that movement.
The principal designer was my partner Mike Simpson who, although an engineer, had strong ties to the environmental design movement (a founding partner of the Synergy West environmental consulting firm), to the Alpine Club of Canada, and was responsible for a number of increasingly "out-there" home designs in the following thirty years.
Mike is the visionary responsible for the Sacred Garden at St. Mary's church in Cochrane and for the Himat project, a sculpture created to raise funds to assist small villages in Nepal. He is a very unique individual and I was fortunate to work side by side with him for 25 years.
I have no records of the costs of the Boothman bridge though I would hazard a guess at around $300,000. Six years later, I recall having multiple discussions with the city to justify the $1,000,000 cost for Carburn bridge. (Probably equivalent to $10 million in today's dollars?)

John Hextall Bridge

Again, I bet you are scratching your head saying, “Where the heck is that bridge?”  Perhaps you know it better as the old Shouldice Bridge that you can see from the Trans Canada Highway as you pass from Montgomery to Bowness.

The Hextall Bridge was constructed in 1910 by local businessman John Hextall who sought to create an idyllic garden suburb west of Montgomery called Bowness. In 1911, Hextall negotiated with the City of Calgary take over the bridge plus two islands that would become Bowness Park, in exchange for an extension of the Calgary street railway system connecting Calgary with Bowness via the bridge. 

However, only a small number of houses and a golf course were constructed before the economic bust of 1913 halted most construction until after World War I. However, Bowness Park became an immensely popular leisure area – it was the St. Patrick’s and Prince’s Island parks of the early 20th century.  Park crowds of up to 4,000 people were common on Sundays in the mid 20s, huge given the city’s population being only about 60,000. 

The Hextall Bridge, the gateway to Bowness, continued as a street railway bridge until 1950 when it was turned over to vehicular traffic.  However, it was too narrow for cars plus a sidewalk so in 1985 the City approved a new four-lane concrete bridge, turning the Hextall Bridge into a pedestrian/cyclist bridge and incorporating into Calgary’s vision for a world-class, citywide pathway system.

The design, known as the Pratt through-truss system, is a type of truss with parallel chords, all vertical members in compression, all diagonal members in tension with the diagonals slant toward the center.

The components were manufactured in eastern Canada and shipped to the site for assembly. Ironically, this is similar to the Peace and King Bridges, which were also constructed elsewhere and assembled in Calgary.

Hextall Bridge's criss-cross trusses are a lovely example of the industrial sense of design of the early 20th century. 

Why Shouldice Bridge?

In 1906, James Shouldice purchased 470 acres of farmland about 8 kilometers west of the City of Calgary in a community then known as Bowmont. In 1910, Shouldice donated 43-hectars of river valley to the City of Calgary with the understanding that the land would be used as a park and that the streetcar would run to end of his property.  In 1911, the city created Shouldice Park, which has since become one of Calgary’s premier outdoor athletic parks. In 1952, Fred Shouldice, son of James made a financial gift to the City to build a swimming pool on the site. 

The bridge has colourful flowers at each entrance and huge planter boxes in the middel of the bridge.  Cyclist and pedestrians share the space with ease. 

No Respect

Personally, I think the Hextall Bridge is Calgary’s prettiest pedestrian bridge with its huge flower boxes and lovely criss-cross ironwork. But I doubt I will get many Calgarians to agree with me.

When I asked the City if they had any pedestrian/cyclist counts for the bridge they said they have never done counts for this bridge.  I wonder why?

The patina of the wood and steel (with exposed rivets) contrasts with the highly polished sleek look of Calgary's modern pedestrian bridges. 

Last Word

It is eerily how similar the stories of Bowness and Shouldice Parks are to what is currently happening in Calgary:

  • The idyllic visions of new master-planned suburban communities on the edge of the city.
  • The boom and bust of the 1910s. 
  • The donation of land and money to create parks and new recreation facilities by private citizens.

While all the social media chatter these days is about the Peace and George C. King bridge, it is important to remember that Calgary has been building bridges to connect communities to each other and to public spaces for over 100 years. 

If you like this blog, you will like:

Florence: The Ugliest Pedestrian Bridge In The World?

Bridges Over The Bow

A Tale of Three Pedestrian Bridges

Pescara, Italy: One Damn Good Day or 4.5 Hour Lunch

This guest blog is by Gaelen Taylor who I have known since he was 8 years old when I became his Big Brother.  Fast-forward to January 2016 at age 28, he decided to quit his engineering job with Imperial Oil in Edmonton to pursue his keen interest in composing electronic music in Berlin. Since then, he has been publishing regular blogs about his experience.  When I received this blog about his Italian family lunch experience (10 courses and 4.5 hours), I thought it would be fun read for Everyday Tourist readers.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

Pescara, Italy: One Damn Good Day!

About a month ago, I rolled the dice of fate and booked a vacation with Diego, an Italian classmate in my German class.

Pescara Italy

I really didn’t know Diego that well, but decided nothing would be better than to be accompanied by an Italian in Italy - to experience Italy like an Italian. (Especially since I’d experienced his culinary talents when he made handmade pasta for my visiting father and me at a restaurant he is part of in Berlin.) And since Diego, his partner Roberta, and child Amelie were going back to see both of their families (they both come from a small coastal city on the west coast of Italy called Pescara), it just seemed right to take the opportunity. 

I slept about an hour the night before the flight to Rome. The night before that I also had very few quality hours of sleep after the SIN festival (Gaelen has formed a collective of techno-musicians in Berlin called SIN aka Strength In Numbers). After incurring what felt like debilitating neck injuries uncomfortable plane seats (not helped by nonstop kicks from the Italian kid beside me who seemed to think he had both seats), we landed. I woke to enormous applause. I thought this was a bit strange, but maybe everyone claps when the pilot lands the plane on domestic flights in Europe.

But as I looked around, everyone was so excited - like children going to Disneyland - which I had not seen anywhere else on my European travels. The reason, I concluded, was they were all “home” - and for these Italians, this was the highlight of their year as home was something very special to them.

As we rushed from the plane towards the bus (Pescara is a 3-hour bus ride from Rome), my legs felt like jelly as my body started to complain about the effects of sleeplessness.

Once on the air-conditioned bus, I fell asleep instantly, only to be awoken by stabbing neck pains (why do I always forget those neck cushions?). As I tried not to move my neck too fast in fear of being paralyzed, I tilted my head to the window and one of the most scenic images filled my view. We were in the mountains now and I could see a plain of small villages below, with other villages literally built right into the rock face - like a bunch of mountain goats eating grass on an impossibly steep rock face. 

I smiled and closed my eyes. I had no idea what I was getting into - and that for me, is exciting.

MAMAAAAAA!

We exited the bus in the scorching 35 degree C heat. I suddenly heard loud intense screams and cries. It sounded like someone had just been shot. My glance scans around for danger - and then I see it - grown men running to their mothers screaming MAMAAAAAA! Cars start pulling over with people getting out and running to embrace each other. Did we just come back from war?

Roberta’s father comes eliciting similar embraces. There is no room in the car for four travelers and our bags so Roberta and Amelie get into the car while Diego and I walk to the house just 600 meters away. We had to hurry though – Italian lunch (and one of the most incredible eating experiences of my life) was waiting.

Diego, also a victim of sleep deprivation (though his was mostly due to excitement) was filled with adrenaline and smiles as we rushed down the scenic Pescara alleyways to the house. We arrive and met his father - a non-stop Italian prankster in his 70s who looks and moves like he is in his 60s. After we settle in, people start showing up, each time involved screaming, yelling, clapping, kissing and embracing - continually surprising me from the previous moments of reasonable volumes of talking.

After seemingly nonstop, celebrity-style arrivals, the first plates of food arrived. A humble bottle of red and rose wine sit on the table - something which I later learned you can never empty - Italian households have an infinite stock despite the modest appearance of two bottles.

The 4.5 Hour Lunch

Now what I am about to describe is surely the top - or close to top-eating experiences of my life. Partly because of how delicious it was, partly because of the atmosphere and people, and most definitely because of the sheer surprise of how the lunch unfolded. You will ask as you read - how could we have possibly digested that much? Well, we ate for 4.5 hours. And no exaggeration- 4.5 hours of nonstop Italian food. So loosen up your belt.

First course: Appetizers

  • Fresh tomatoes from Diego’s father’s garden, which taste unlike any tomato I have ever had.
  • Pecorino
  • Fresh salsiccia (like homemade Italian peperoni-type-deliciousness)

Second course: Pasta

  • Hand made fettuccine in fresh hand made tomato sauce

Third course: More Pasta

  • Hand made (seeing a theme here?) ravioli with vegetable and ricotta filling. Un.be.lievable.

Fourth course:  Fresh Cheese

  • Fresh mozzarella from cow’s milk. Tastes unlike no other mozzarella I have ever had.

Fifth course: Delicious Meats

  • These were the moistest, most delicious meatballs ever. I actually asked Diego what meat they were made of. Turns out just regular beef but ridiculously moist and tender. I have no idea what sorcery was involved in making them.

Sixth course: ArrosticiniAbruzzesi

  • Abruzzesi is the region that Pescara is in – and arrosticini is the dish that makes grown men cry.
  • Essentially, it is lamb on wooden skewers, but I can’t describe how insane this stuff tastes. It was so tender and full of taste that most often people eat these until they get sick (no lie)!

Let’s take a moment to talk about our lord and saviour, Arrosticini: 

One thing to know about arrosticini is the specific way of cooking it. There are special made grills for just this purpose. Here are some photos I have collected of arrosticini grills:

  

  Diego's Father - arrosticini maste

Diego's Father - arrosticini maste

 Industrial grade arrosticini cooking - over 100 at a time

Industrial grade arrosticini cooking - over 100 at a time

Tall Tale Teller?

At this point, Diego’s father starts telling stories of how serious of an eater he is (all in Italian which required translation for me). One time he said he ate 50 oysters and later that night he needed to go to the hospital where he stayed for a week. He stands by his belief he only ate 2 or 3 too many (not maybe 40 that is likely more accurate).

Another story bubbles up regarding eating a kilogram of mushrooms. However, it ends in the same fashion (hospital). This is a new class of eating – where, at times, a hospital visit from overeating is needed.

Back to the 4.5 hour lunch

Seventh course: More Fresh Cheese

  • Buffalo mozzarella, much firmer than mozzarella from cow’s milk and a bit sharper in taste. This one is my new favourite.
  • Fresh made ricotta. It felt like you were eating clouds.

Eighth course: Cake from heaven

  • Diego’s mother used to be a professional baker at a local cake shop.
  • The cake was some form of Italian ricotta cheese cake. I can’t even begin to describe it but it was amazing.
  • She made sure to tell me that it “was nothing” and that I should have seen and tasted her baking in her younger days!
  • Also, I witness the first time she ever tried the cake, which is ridiculous given she’s made it for years.

Ninth course: Hand made Gelato and homegrown melon

  • There were about 7 flavours. Pistachio and melon were out of this world - like way out. At this point, I am so high up on the stairway to culinary heaven; I cannot speak (also because I am so full).

Tenth course: Diego’s mother’s special coffee and “coffee killer”

  • The coffee was made up of a secret combination of different kinds of coffee – really tasty and insanely strong. I have no idea how she made it - it wasn’t espresso and she could only make ONE at a time.
  • Grappa, the “coffee killer” is a form of schnapps made from wine. I hear the Grappa and coffee are to help your body process all of the food you just consumed.
 Mama's  coffee - really needed at this point 

Mama's  coffee - really needed at this point 

 Grappa - the coffee killer

Grappa - the coffee killer

 

Walk It Off!

Oh and your wine glass is never empty throughout the course of this lunch. 

At the end, they all said I was the first foreigner to eat every dish they prepared - I felt as if I had just received a medal from the Italian President.

Pretty tipsy from all the wine and so full I could barely speak without sounding like Jabba the Hut, I rolled out of my chair in ecstasy and went for a walk with Diego and his father.

During the walk, we stopped every 2 minutes to talk to people they knew. The walk was very good for the digestion – if you ever do this Italian power circuit of food, you must not sit afterwards. You must keep moving!

So tired afterwards, we went back to Roberta’s father’s house where we were staying. My head hit the pillow and I was asleep instantly.

It was one damn good day!
  Diego and his father heading out for a walk! LOL!

Diego and his father heading out for a walk! LOL!

Last Word

Gaelan’s experience reminded me of my amazing seven-course with wine pairings gastronomic experience at Restaurant Le Cinq in Paris (one of the top restaurants in the world) with renowned Calgary food and restaurant critic John Gilchrist.  I was very, very lucky to be the “stand in” for John’s wife Catherine who was unable to make it. I am forever in her and his debt.

Community Gardens: The New Yoga Studio?

Seems like everywhere I wander these days I encounter a community garden. In the past two weeks, I have happened upon amazing gardens in East Village at Fort Calgary Park, the backyard of the Banff Trail Community Centre and side yard of the Altadore School & Community Edible Garden.  I was literally gobsmacked by how healthy the plants at the Altadore School Garden were. 

East Village's community garden includes a funky shade structure that makes for a great place to sit and people watch.

The plants at the Altadore School &Community Edible Garden were humungous, twice the size of anything I have seen in other gardens.  

The Banff Trail community garden is a more typical community garden in my mind.

Community Gardens Gone Wild?

Not only does it seem like every school and every community centre in the City has a community garden, but more and more backyard and front yards being convert to or incorporating vegetable gardens also.  Is this just a trend or have the public become more and more aware of the value of eating healthy. Are community gardens the new yoga studio?

Pretty much everything you need to know about Calgary Community Gardens is at the Garden Resource Network hosted by the Calgary Horticultural Society. I was amazed to learn there are 169 (87 public and 82 private) community gardens in Calgary as of July 2016.  No wonder I am seeing community gardens everywhere I wander these days but didn’t in the past - there were only 12 community gardens in 2008 and 130 in 2010.

Link: Garden Resource Network

Past vs. Present

Interestingly 100 years ago in Calgary and most cities across North America, it was common practice to have a vegetable garden in your backyard and some might even have a pig, a few chickens and a cow. On a recent walking tour of West Hillhurst lead by David Peyto for Historic Calgary Week, he informed us it was common practice early in the 20th century for new homeowners to buy two lots - one for the house and one for the garden.  I can’t imagine anyone doing that these days. But who knows, “the times are a changin.” 

Fast forward a hundred years. Houses have more than tripled in size with a double garage as big as many of the cottage homes built in the early 20th century.  New homes sport huge concrete driveways in the front and big decks filling lots that are often half the size they once were. Room for a garden is minimal at best. In older communities, mature trees and tall infills create so much shade there isn’t much sun for a garden. In addition, more and more Calgarians are living in apartments and condos so there is no back or front yard, so it isn’t surprising that community gardens have become more popular.   Hence, the popularity of community gardens in the 21st century.

Using schools, community centres and parks for communal gardens is a great idea as it also fosters a sense of community as people learn gardening tips for each other and help each other with watering and weeding.

Here is a garden in the backyard of an older cottage home that illustrates how at one time the garden space too up more lot space than the house.  

Another lovely backyard garden in an established Calgary community. 

The front yard can work also for a vegetable garden, especially if it is on the southside where it will get more early spring sun - at least on this side of the equator it will.

Community Garden Generate More Taxes?

I wondered if anyone has looked at how community gardens impact house prices as has been done with proximity to parks, transit and bike lanes. Indeed, in 2008 Real Estate Economics (the oldest academic journal focusing on real estate issues) published “The Effect of Community Gardens on Neighboring Property Values” by Ioan Voicu and Vicki Been. The authors documented that homes near community gardens increased in value by up to 9% after five years of the garden being developed.  Furthermore the positive impact of community gardens was greatest in poor neighbourhoods and increased with the quality of the garden. The authors also noted that the increase in property values as a result of community gardens was worth billions in additional property tax revenues for cities.

Link: "The Effect of Community Gardens on Neighboring Property Values"

East Village's community garden would be a good example of a high quality garden with is ornamental fence and patio stone walkways.  

Altadore School also has many highend features like the metal vs wood raised gardens, poured concrete sidewalk and two large circular concrete areas that will become outdoor classrooms. 

Banff Trail has a wonderful orchard as part of their upscale community garden. 

Calgary Mega Community Garden

Did you know that Calgary has an 11-acre community garden just off of the Trans Canada Highway (you can see if you look south just west of the Stoney Trail intersection)?  Grow Calgary, a group of 50 dedicated volunteers (and hundreds more on a casual basis) have created Canada’s largest urban farm with all of the produce harvested going to Calgary’s Compassionate Food Access Agencies (16 different agencies).  The farm grows everything from carrots to cabbage, zucchini to turnips. Grow Calgary is currently waiting to hear from the Province if they can expand the farm by utilizing the transportation utility corridor along the Trans Canada Highway.  To me, this is a no brainer, but their 2014 application still awaits a response!

Last Word

Today, urban farming produces about 15% of the world’s food supply according to the United States Department of Agriculture. This is forecasted to increase as the world’s population continues to become more and more concentrated in cities.  Whether it is tiny backyard plots, community gardens, guerrilla gardening on vacant lots, indoor hanging gardens, rooftop growing or vertical gardens - urban farming is here to stay.

Could community gardens and urban farming be the new yoga?

If you like this blog, you will like:

Front Yard Fun!

Silver Springs' Amazing Community Flower Garden

Chance Meetings: Garden, Volleyball, Sidewalk Stamps

 

Redwood: Abstracting From Nature

I know I should be focused on my golf game at all times during a round, but my mind and eyes love to wander especially on my home course Redwood Meadows Golf & Country Club. 
Abstracting From Nature #1

Now that I carry my iPhone everywhere, it is easy to wander into the natural areas (sometimes I am even rewarded with a ball or two) that line many of the holes to experience mother nature and take a few pictures.

Over the past few years I have been collecting these photos and playing with them bit to create what I think are fascinating abstract images.  I love the diversity of colours and textures and the way they remind me of some of my favourite painters e.g. Jean-Paul Riopelle and Francis Bacon.  There is a richness and intensity that is primal and compelling for me. 

I hope you enjoy these images and find them as engaging and intriguing as I do.  I'd love to hear your comments and know which ones are your favourites.  

P.S. Flaneuring into the bush while golfing is also a good way to fill in the time so you don't get frustrated by slow play. You won't find that golf tip on the Golf Channel or in Golf Digest!

 

Abstracting From Nature #2
Abstracting From Nature #3
Abstracting From Nature #4
Abstracting From Nature #5
abstracting from nature #9
Abstracting From Nature #10
Abstracting From Nature #6
Abstracting from nature #11
Abstracting from nature #12

Garden Flaneuring: Try it you might like it!

Why wait until you are on holidays to have flaneuring fun?  For many people, one of the fun things to do is visit gardens when they are on holidays.  Even those who aren’t into gardening, often love to “stop and smell the flowers” when on vacation. 

Bird baths create a wonderful sense of place in a garden. 

Standout Front Yards

While it may not be the equivalent to visiting Vancouver Island’s Buchart Gardens, Chicago’s Botanical Gardens, Hamilton’s Royal Botanical Gardens or Portland’s Japanese Garden, most of us can go for a walk in our neighbourhood and enjoy the lovely front gardens of our neighbours.  For those who love art, garden flaneuring can be like going to Santa Fe and visiting the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum.  In our neighbourhood one or two homes on every block have a "standout" front yard or perhaps a special flower.

Iris Eroticism

  The irises were lovely this year.  Every time I see an iris I can't help but think of Georgia O'Keeffe. Link:     Georgia O'Keeffe

The irises were lovely this year.  Every time I see an iris I can't help but think of Georgia O'Keeffe. Link: Georgia O'Keeffe

Iris erotism
  Found this guy hidden under a large shrub in our front garden. 

Found this guy hidden under a large shrub in our front garden. 

  Irises have to one of the most erotic flowers. 

Irises have to one of the most erotic flowers. 

 Need I say more....

Need I say more....

Meet The Neighbours?

Wandering the neighbourhood checking out the gardens is often full of unexpected surprises.   While out gardening flaneuring, we will often say “lovely garden” when we see someone working in their yard, which always elicits a smile and sometimes even a brief chat.

Fun With Colours?

  Poppies have the most wonderful colour and shapes, especially in the morning light.  

Poppies have the most wonderful colour and shapes, especially in the morning light. 

It looked like these lilies were on fire one morning in June. 

  It has been a great year in Calgary for roses.  

It has been a great year in Calgary for roses.  

Dying Flower Art

  Sometimes I think flowers are most interesting as they are dying, they become more asymmetrical and sculptural.  

Sometimes I think flowers are most interesting as they are dying, they become more asymmetrical and sculptural.  

  Found this work of art on the next block, couldn't resist taking it photo. 

Found this work of art on the next block, couldn't resist taking it photo. 

  This peony captured my eye as I was finishing up the blog, more and more I am appreciating the beauty in the dying flower. 

This peony captured my eye as I was finishing up the blog, more and more I am appreciating the beauty in the dying flower. 

Deep Purple 

  Found this huge clematis (6+ inches wide) in a forgotten side garden near the end of our garden flaneur vacation.  It was perfectly formed and totally open. 

Found this huge clematis (6+ inches wide) in a forgotten side garden near the end of our garden flaneur vacation.  It was perfectly formed and totally open. 

  This is perhaps my favourite flower from our garden this season.

This is perhaps my favourite flower from our garden this season.

  I didn't even know they made speckled petunias.  Found these in a pot a few blocks away, while garden flaneuring recently. Next year!

I didn't even know they made speckled petunias.  Found these in a pot a few blocks away, while garden flaneuring recently. Next year!

Everyday Gardening Fun

Or if you are like me, you can create your own garden, which you can flaneur every day as there is always something new to experience in a garden. 

Just like a tourist, wander the garden with your iPhone or camera and take pictures every day.  I have often thought it would be interesting to post a “garden pic-a-day” from April to October and see what kind of response I get.  I will often tweet out a photo from one of my morning garden flaneurs with the text “Goooooooood Morrrrrrrrrrrrrrning Calgary!” 

Gardening is not only therapeutic but it can also be a fun way to get to know your neighbours. In our case, we have bonded with our neighbours on both sides over our gardens, so much so that we have integrated our front yards into one large garden.  (Backstory: This is ironic as the three houses sit on land that was one lot until the early ‘90s when an infill developer bought the 100-foot lot and subdivided it into three lots.)

  The pathway to our secret garden was littered with rose pedals after a recent rain, create a romantic sense of place.

The pathway to our secret garden was littered with rose pedals after a recent rain, create a romantic sense of place.

Daycare Fun!

One of my little pleasures in life, it taking my morning coffee and wandering the garden while parents drop off their kids at the “Honey Bee” daycare across the street. The kids wave and the parents smile; the start of another perfect summer day – that is until the first double bogie on the golf course.  

  In our front yard we have two old pieces of playground equipment.  The hamburglar looks out from an old fence we rescued from a house across the street that was being torn down for a new infill. The daycare kids love it.  

In our front yard we have two old pieces of playground equipment.  The hamburglar looks out from an old fence we rescued from a house across the street that was being torn down for a new infill. The daycare kids love it.  

  We also have Tommy The Turtle hidden in the front yard jungle.  There are two daycare kids who have found it and ask if they can sit on it, if I am in the yard. 

We also have Tommy The Turtle hidden in the front yard jungle.  There are two daycare kids who have found it and ask if they can sit on it, if I am in the yard. 

  Note the golf clubs?

Note the golf clubs?

  Flaneuring gardens at night is a totally different experience from day time flaneuring.  You should try it.

Flaneuring gardens at night is a totally different experience from day time flaneuring. You should try it.

Try It! You Might Just Like It!

So if you want to try being an “everyday tourist” this summer, grab your camera and go for walk taking pictures of the neighbours’ gardens.  When you get home, grab your favourite beverage and have a look at your pics and relive the beauty of your travels, just like you would on vacation.

If you like it, consider taking a “garden flaneur” vacation every week.

Black and white garden photography lets you see your garden in a whole different light (pun intended). 

  This image is taken of  grass mound with the frosted glass patio fence in the background. It is amazing all the things you see when you take out your camera and start looking. 

This image is taken of  grass mound with the frosted glass patio fence in the background. It is amazing all the things you see when you take out your camera and start looking. 

  Gardens are fun places to experiment. 

Gardens are fun places to experiment. 

  Our other bird bath. 

Our other bird bath. 

Nelson BC: Fun, Funky & Quirky

A recent visit to Nelson BC, brought many smiles to our faces as we explored its streets and back alleys.  Nelson might just be Canada’s most bohemian community

It started right from the “get-go” when we checked in at the Adventure Hotel and were dazzled by the psychedelic carpet staircase - inspired by an “acid dream I am sure.” 

The staircase at the Adventure Hotel is like walking on a neon sign. 

After a day of driving (with stops to check out downtown Fernie and thrift stores in Creston), we were anxious to do some flaneuring. We immediately found the two-storey  Touchstones Nelson Museum of Art and History located in a former Post Office building built in 1902. Once inside, we were quickly immersed in a fantasy world of strange goblins and creatures from the imagination of artist Jude Griebel; this was a good start.  

The fantasy world of Griebel is weird and wacky, the head in the foreground is made of bones. 

Then after checking out Touchstones’ museum, we headed to Nelson’s Main Street (aka Baker Street) for some window licking fun as most of the stores had closed by then. We stumbled upon Relish - what a fun name for a restaurant!  The place had a good buzz, we were thirsty and hungry so in we went. 

Just one of the many fun window reflections along Baker Street.

A cold glass each of Harvest Moon Organic Hemp Ale from the Nelson Brewery Company (NBC) quenched our thirst.  I think NBC should win some type of award for the best beer names – Paddywack, Faceplant, AfterDark and Full Nelson!  My amazing burger with brie and apple still has me salivating.

After a little more street and alley wandering, we called it a day.  

The evening light filters through the tree lined downtown streets to create an eerie canopy. 

Day 2: I thought I was going to die!

Up early, we decided to check out the Oso Negro Café, which research told is the best place in town for breakfast. Expecting a small bohemian café, we were stunned by the amazing urban café atmosphere mixed with an enchanting garden setting.  Service was friendly and efficient so the long line up moved quickly.  The place was full of people of all ages - adults chatting, kids playing and nobody on their phone or computer.  How quirky is that?

The Oso Negro cafe has the most inviting garden I have ever encountered. It is both private and public at the same time. The light is magical. It may well be the best place to sit that I have ever experienced.  They even have a map that tells you what all the plants are. 

It was a beautiful day so I had to check out the local Granite Pointe golf course.  Being a single golfer, it was easy to walk on. What wasn’t so was to walk the golf course (even for a seasoned walker like me).  I had a quick debate with the Pro Shop attendant if the course was walkable and we agreed I could probably do it.  He showed me the hill at hole #10 and said that is the biggest climb. It was a gradual climb so didn’t look too intimidating. 

Walking down the 9th hole I was feeling pretty good about my decision to walk the course.

So off I went, clubs on my back, to enjoy what looked like a walk in the park. The front nine wasn’t bad - the views of the city, lake and mountains were spectacular.  I climbed the 10th but it was harder than I had imagined - going down 11 seemed just as hard as going up.  By the 14th I knew I was in trouble.  I was dragging my butt and wondering if I could finish; this had never happened to me before.  “Am I really getting that old?” I had to ask myself.  I finished - but just barely - as 18 was another climb up a hill to a green guarded by a huge granite rock. If I hit the rock who knows where the ball would go and I certainly wasn’t going to go looking for it.  Fortunately, I hit the green, parred the hole, got into my car and headed straight to the Adventure Hotel for a couple of those NBC beers. 

The hill climbing provided wonderful view of the lake and mountains. 

Dinner was at Itza Pizza across the street from the Adventure Hotel as I didn’t have the energy to wander too far.  The sign said best pizza in town and we also learned that back in 2011, Rick Nelson, Itza’s owner and pizza maker was one of four chefs across Canada to compete in Canadian Pizza Magazine’s (who knew there was a pizza magazine, let alone a Canadian one) best Canadian pizza contest. While Nelson didn’t win, he still makes a great pizza.  We had front row seats to Nelson’s street ballet on Itza’s street patio located on the parking spot in front of the restaurant – very urban.   We enjoyed our Harvest Pizza with pesto, sundried tomato, apples, smoked gruyere, roasted red peppers and pickled capers.

Unfortunately I had no energy left to check out the blues band playing across the street that night at Finley’s Bar and Grill across the street.  

Day 3: Caffeine Heaven

Rested, it was back to Oso Negro Café for a repeat breakfast.  By this time we were thinking this must be the best café in the world.

On the way, we noticed a sleazy looking mannequin standing in the back alley. We had to check it out.  It was in front of a funky looking hair salon, which we didn’t think was open at 8 am, but when I peaked in there were people inside and we were invited in to the “Chop Shop.”  Turns out this 50s themed salon/museum was featured on Slice Network’s “Chop Shop” Show.    

Who could resist checking out a barber pole like this one? Not us!

The Chop Shop the most unique and friendliest barbershop I have ever encountered. 

When we arrived at Oso Negro, we were again in caffeine heaven.  It is the perfect place to start the morning as the garden was bathed in early morning sunshine. We lingered for over an hour, people watching and enjoying our muffins and Oso Negro coffee, which we found out is roasted just a few blocks away.

  Another view of Oso Negro garden, sorry I don't think even if I included 10 photos I could capture the wonderful sense of place. 

Another view of Oso Negro garden, sorry I don't think even if I included 10 photos I could capture the wonderful sense of place. 

While Brenda went off to do more thrifting, I went to take photos of the buildings, streets, alleys and shops.  As I was wandering, I discovered the west end of Baker Street was closed for a flower street market.  The street was full of characters from the lady trying to sell worm farms to another lady giving her little dog a drink of water out of a baby bottle. I did say Nelson was fun, funky and quirky, didn’t I? 

There are many wonderful turn of the century buildings like this courthouse in downtown Nelson

Electric Circus books and records had this amazing collection of Beat books. It was a wonderful place to explore.

This flower shop in an alley has a wonderful European ambience. 

Found this wall of seeds in a quirky grocery/garden shop. 

The Baker Street Plant Market attracted an eclectic crowd to downtown.

Then it was off to check out Cottonwood Falls and adjacent Railtown district at the west end of Baker Street. The falls, a hidden gem, though small it packs a big punch -as the water crashing over the black rocks creates a mist that, combined with the sunlight, is ethereal.

Cottonwood Falls is tucked away in a small industrial park on the west end of downtown. 

We next met up with Alex, who toured us through the Nelson Brewery Company building, with all its shiny hardware and hoses creating what looks like a madman’s laboratory – there is even a door that says, “laboratory!” NBC is brewed in funky- looking old building that has been a brewery for over 100 years, so this isn’t some new kid on the craft brewery block, rather something that has evolved over the past century.

As all NBC beers are organic, you have to drink them reasonably quickly (they have a best before date), which I see as a bonus. If you want a tour, fill out the form on the website and they will get back to you quickly.

NBC's brewery is like a mad scientists lab.

Dinner was the Smokehouse BBQ, which is as authentic as you can get thousands of kilometers from southern USA with its plywood and corrugated steel interior. Order from the kitchen window and your meal is brought to you in a cardboard take-away box even if you are eating in.  We grabbed a window seat and chowed down on a finger licking good meal of ribs and pulled pork that was as good as anything we had in Austin Texas (unfortunately, it’s not licensed to serve alcohol).

El Taco is a very popular spot for locals. Did you know that on a per capital basis Nelson has more restaurants than New York City?

While there, we were treated to a steady stream of people picking up their Smokehouse BBQ orders as well as people heading to El Taco restaurant across the street.  As we left, we asked a young Nelsonian enjoying his pizza from Thor’s Pizzeria next to the Smokehouse what he knew about El Taco and he said it is very good and very popular with the locals.  He also added Thor’s has the best pizza in town.

Then it was off for an evening walk along the waterfront pathway. While the pathway along the West Arm of Kootenay Lake is lovely, the place was surprisingly deserted, even on a warm mid-May evening.

The waterfront pathway is a lovely walk along the lake which even has a beach at the bridge. We expected to find lots of people walking and cycling along the pathway, but it was deserted.   

One of the many lovely reflections of the boats in the water along the pathway. 

Last Word

We had a great time in Nelson; our only regrets are we didn’t have enough time to check out all of the great dining spots and that we didn’t do the Pulpit Rock trail which locals highly recommended for its great views. 

A big surprise was that while Nelson has a reputation of being a great art town, there aren’t  many art galleries and lots of the art (galleries, public art and street art) we saw was not as professional and contemporary as we expected. 

Street Art mixes with graffiti on this garage door. 

Perhaps the biggest surprise was that given Nelson’s reputation as the marijuana growing capital of Canada, we didn’t see or smell any evidence of it wherever we travelled in the city.

 

While we didn't see or smell the use of marijuana, there is a store on Baker Street next to the CIBC building where you can buy it, like you are buying an ice cream cone or perhaps some gelato. There were at least 50 flavours.  

Banners are better than flowers!

Every city in the world is looking for ways to make its downtown streets friendlier. Two of the most common methods are to add colourful banners and hanging baskets of flowers to brighten up what can often be a cold and grey environment.

Calgary's 7th Avenue downtown transit corridor is a very grey, stark place most of the time.

Tacky Plastic Flowers

Flaneuring Calgary’s downtown recently (being the everyday tourist that I am), I was again appalled that someone thought it was a good idea to add hanging baskets with plastic flowers at the 7th Avenue downtown stations.  I was appalled months ago, but I thought it might pass. Is it only me, or do others think this is just tacky?

To brighten up the LRT stations hanging plastic flowers have been added to the station, which is very surreal on a cold winter day.

Banners are better!

I can understand why they did it - the street is lined with rather ominous office towers and there is no light for flowers or plants to grow – especially given Calgary has only 110-frost free days. Also, artificial plants are very low maintenance – no watering, fertilizer and deadheading needed. 

However, there is a better solution - banners.  Calgary has a very active and attractive banner program in other parts of downtown – Stephen Avenue Walk, downtown bridges, 17th Avenue and Kensington Village. 

Stephen Avenue has banners that change with the seasons and help make the street a more cheerful place for pedestrians. 

Where Have All The Banners Gone?

The 7th Avenue LRT Stations already have banner poles and I have seen banners up from time to time.  However, there doesn’t seem to be a strategy or program to hang seasonal banners at all times as there is in other high pedestrian areas.  With over 100,000 people using 7th Avenue every weekday, you would think it would be a high priority area for making it the most attractive place possible.

Currently there are banners are up at the 8th Street LRT Station, sponsored by the University of Calgary (its downtown building close by).  So, it would seem if a downtown business or organization wants to create their own banners, Calgary Transit is willing to will let them use the banner poles.

8th Street Station Banners add much needed colour for those waiting for a train. 

This photo is from a few year back when Kerby Station had banners when it first opened, thanks to Calgary Transit. 

Today the 7th Avenue streetscape has very few banner even though the numerous poles that line the street have been designed for them. 

Love These Banners

And at the same time I was observing the lack of colour along 7th Avenue, I was enjoying the lovely banners on 14th Street as I crossed over the beautiful Bow River on my walk into downtown.  The current banners - with their colourful and playful Impressionistic paintings of downtown – are lovely; they would be a delightful addition to downtown’s 7th Avenue LRT stations, which currently are very barren, grey and industrial.

Many of Calgary's downtown bridges have lovely colourful banners that change on a regular basis. 

Last Word

I have always thought banners are better than flowers, as they add colour year-round and there is  minimal maintenance.  The best banner programs are ones that change with the seasons, to help keep the sense of place fresh.  

If you like this blog, you will like:

Calgary's 10th Avenue SW Renaissance

Window licking in Florence

Peyto: Calgary's Everyday Street Walker

It's Easy To Be An Everyday Tourist!

You don't have to try that hard to be an everyday tourist wherever you live.  You just have to get out and walk with a bit of curiosity and your eyes wide open.   

This week's highlights included:

  • An early morning walk in River Park with the morning sun glistening off the Bow River.
  • A dog walk with Rossi to the base of the Glenmore Dam
  • A trip to Evergreen to get my income taxes done
  • Downtown flaneuring
  • Walking home from yoga enjoyed a lovely evening chinook from the West Hillhurst bluff
  • A spectacular sunset from my backyard
  • Wandering Bowness Park
  • A morning walk in my community
  • Reading Jan Morris' book "Hong Kong" published in 1997

Here is my Everyday Tourist Week in photos....hope you enjoy.

Early Saturday morning walk with Rossi in River Park looking down on the sun glistening off the Elbow River. It was magical. 

With Calgary's early spring there are these lovely rag dolls everywhere. 

Sunday Rossi and I decided to go for along walk that took us to Calgary's Glenmore Dam, which use to have cars driving on top of it, but today it is a wonderful pedestrian bridge. 

Water rushing out of the Glenmore dam. 

Glenmore dam was built in 1932 for $3.8 million.  It has wonderful Art Deco elements. 

Found this debris still wrapped around a tree from the 2013 flood. 

These rocks haunted me with the way the light was reflecting off of them. 

A trip to the community of Evergreen to drop off paper work for income tax resulted in this photo. 

I am always amazed at what new things I can find when wandering downtown.  This fancy fence is part of a temporary plaza on top of the underground parkade where the York Hotel use to sit. The patterns on the fence are taken from the decorations on the facade of the hotel. 

Construction Impressionism in downtown Calgary.  For me downtown Calgary is just one big outdoor art gallery. 

Window licking collage in downtown Calgary. 

7th Avenue surrealism in downtown Calgary 

3rd Avenue downtown Calgary 

I had no idea I had captured this woman in this photo when I took it.  At the time I was cursing that the windows were dirty and I couldn't get clean reflections. Now I love the ambiguity of the narrative that this image suggests. Urban surprises come in many different ways. 

Coming home from yoga I notice the Chinook Arch forming in the west and decided to detour to the West Hillhurst bluff (aka dog park) to get a better view. I never get tired of Calgary's iconic cloud formation. 

While in the park I found this huge tree branch, which ironically mirrored the Chinook Arch formation.  What a great idea for public artwork?

Just a few blocks from my house I found this Horse Head tree swing.  For some reason it seemed very disturbing. (not that there is anything wrong with that) If you like this image you might like Front Yard Fun blog.

Also just a few blocks away is a house where the porch has become a bike rack. I love the fact that my community is filling up with young kids. 

Looking forward to Bowness Park this summer. It will be like a walk back in time with the renovations. 

One night as I am watching the NHL playoffs I notice a bright yellow light shinning in my backyard.  When I went outside this is what I found. 

Lo-Burn: Austin's Vintage District

Mid-century flaneuring always makes me happy. I think it is the cheerful colours – bright oranges, baby blues, spring greens and sunshine yellows.

If you are into vintage and visiting Austin the Lo-Burn (Lower Burnet Road) district is a “must see.”

You can't miss Top Drawer Thrift with its huge floor lamp, lime green facade and drawers on the roof.  

Lo-Burn IBIZ District

We stumbled upon this up and coming district when we entered “thrift stores” on Google Maps and saw a cluster on Burnet Road (pronounced “Burn-it” by locals) from 49th N Street to North Loop Boulevard. Conveniently, it was in the car2go home area, so off we went.

Here you will find not only three thrift stores, but two mid-century furniture shops, an antique store and an outlet designer women’s clothing boutique, as well as local eatery favourites - Torchy’s Tacos and Tiny Pies. If you walk further south there are some other places that look interesting…but who has time to eat when there are treasures to be found.

Top Drawer Thrift (SW corner of Burnett and W 49th St)

Top Drawer Thrift was the best thrift store we found in Austin by a long shot.  While it isn’t the largest it had great quality and selection of vintage clothing, home accessories and art. The displays were fun and exotic. The staff were friendly and the prices were great.  The electronic section was the big surprise with unusual items from a huge pile of vintage radio tubes (Brenda couldn’t resist adding one to her collection) to old film projectors.  I got a framed kitschy artwork with a Cowboy face and Old Made cards background.

Vintage radio tubes at Top Drawer Thrift

Vintage electronics at Top Drawer Thrift

Vintage Fun

Uptown Modern (5111 Burnet Rd) is like walking into a mid-century furniture art museum.  The show room is spacious and the displays are grouped by colour.  If I was starting an art collection, this is where I would head.

Gypsies Antiques (5202 Burnet Rd) is a traditional antique store with many very interesting vignettes under glass domes.  And Vin Taj (52,000 Burnet Rd) has not only interesting furniture and home accessories, but some great paintings that we would have loved to take home.  Darn those airline baggage size restrictions!

Learn more about Austin’s mid-century modern scene

Uptown Modern has a wonderful collection of vintage furniture, home accessories and art. 

One of several glass dome pieces at Gypsies Antiques

Spring Frost Boutique (5101 Burnet Rd)

Though Spring Frost is not a vintage shop (it stocks designer clothing and shoes at deep discount prices), it is worth checking out. The staff were friendly and let me take all the photos I wanted. I love photographing women shoes – to me some are like works of miniature works of art.

Spring Frost shoe fun!

American League Alliance (4901 Burnet Rd)

Across the street from Top Drawer is a large American League Alliance thrift store, which is definitely worth stopping into. checking out. They had some great deals on cowboy boots when we were there. It is staffed by charming retired ladies who are very attentive to creating wonderful displays that give the store a vintage, grandmother-like atmosphere.

Savers (5222 Burnet RD)

Savers is Austin’s equivalent of Value Village and is just three blocks north of the Top Drawer.

American League has everything including the piano. 

Refreshments

I am told Torchy’s Tacos (5119 Burnet Rd), an icon in Austin, started with a single food cart. It now has several stores across the city.  The Burnet Road eatery’s patio is good place to recharge your batteries. 

Tiny Pies (5035 Burnet Road) - Zagat says, “The pies are just like mom used to make, only much much smaller. The petite offerings are modern twists on family recipes and include everything from breakfast pies to strawberry-basil pies, plus quiche, pie pops and mason-jar desserts.”  We loved the pecan pies after our Torchy’s tacos.

There is also a fun food truck hub village across the street from Tiny Pies. A bit hidden in the parking lot at the back, but it is worth a look with its own playground and a barbershop up front. How cool is that?

Pinthouse Pizza, Apothecary Café and Wine Bar, Pinthouse Pizza and Phoenicia Bakery and Deli south of W 49th Street all looked interesting.

Torchy's Tacos hit the spot!

Lo-Burn's food cart lot includes several food carts, a barber shop and playground. Very Cool!

IBIZ 101

Of Austin’s eight IBIZ (Independent Business Improvement Zones) Lo-Burn was the most interesting.

The criteria for an IBIZ district include:

  • At least 75% locally owned businesses (currently, all districts host 95% to 100% locally owned businesses)
  • Have 20 to 100 businesses (current districts have 23 to 90 businesses)
  • No more than one mile in walkable distance (current districts range from .4 to 1 mile)

Top Drawer Thrift fashions!

Last Word

Don’t expect a lot of streetscape improvements - banners, hanging flower baskets or street furniture – along Austin’s IBIZs.  And while the distances are walkable, the sidewalks may not be in the greatest shape (nor might there always be one) and streets are more vehicle-oriented than pedestrian-friendly.

But for the urban wanderer, these are interesting places to explore. We went to Lo-Burn twice!

Bonus: We were lucky enough to have the same car2go we’d parked 3 hours ago, still parked in the same spot we left it. 

If you like this blog, you will like:

Winnipeg's Old World Charm 

Shoe Shopping: 1600 km road trip

Dublin: FAB Fun in The Libertines

Melrose: Phoenix's emerging vintage district

 

car2go tips for the savvy urban traveller

The savvy urban traveller today has more transportation options when s/he is travelling than ever before. It used to be the options were to walk, take transit, hail a cab or rent a car.  Now the list often includes things like car2go, Lyft, Uber and bike rentals.

A big walker, I usually just give myself enough time to walk as I often find hidden gems along the way.  And given most of my holidays are spent wandering the streets of the city centre, walking and public transit are my norm. However, I am finding more and more I want to travel beyond the city centre to find those hidden urban gems.

When researching Austin TX, I quickly discovered many of the music venues I wanted to go to and the thrift stores Brenda wanted to dissect were not easily walkable from our Clarksville neighbourhood Airbnb. 

Also quickly figuring out public transit in Austin wasn’t great and Brenda not being a bike rider, our options were quickly becoming more limited.  That was when I thought this holiday would be a good time to give car2go a try.  There had been many times in Calgary when I had passed one of their “funny little cars” and thought how quick and easy it would be to hop into one rather than walk the 50 minutes each way to a downtown meeting from our house.

So like all good travel writers, I contacted car2go, which just happens to have its head office in Austin, and asked if they would be willing give the Everyday Tourist some free minutes while we were in Austin in return for texting out about where we took our car2go.  There was no obligation (or pressure what so ever) to do a blog and write something nice about them. They were genuinely happy to simply have us tweet out how we used car2go.

They even offered – and I readily accepted an orientation in Calgary so we could hit the road “driving” when we arrived at the Austin airport.

Big Savings:

During our two-week Austin stay (Feb 25 to March 8, 2016), our car2go costs added up to $317.82 US for our 44 trips. Renting a small car would have cost us about $800 US, plus gas and parking.  The $500 savings paid for one of our airfares; that’s being savvy traveller.

Lessons Learned:

Yes, you can fit two good size pieces of luggage in the back of a car2go.  (Car2go currently has airport parking access in six of their 13 North American locations - Austin, TX; Columbus, OH; Vancouver, BC; Calgary, AB; Toronto, ON and Minneapolis, MN.)

I loved that I could reserve a car for 30 minutes on my phone and know exactly where it would be waiting for me. I even found I didn’t mind that 5 or 10-minute walk to my car as it felt I was getting some exercise – walk and ride vs. park and ride! And it sure was much nicer than walking to a nearby bus stop and waiting 5, 10 or 15 minutes. 

I loved the ability to park just about anywhere, as you need only a little space and the cars maneuver easily to park. (Caution: The parking rules are different in every city so be sure to review the parking information on their local website for the city you are visiting before you go.)

Only in Austin can it be 30 C and they still call it winter (we were there in late February and early March and it sure felt like summer). Brenda loved that the air conditioning was “instant on.”

car2go allowed us to check out off the beaten path places like Black's BBQ. Now that's a rib. 

But what we loved most is car2go gave us the freedom to quickly explore places in Austin we probably would never have done without using car2go. This can be particularly good on short vacations when time is limited. It also meant we could visit three, sometimes four, districts a day, jumping in and out of the car all day long as if we owned it.  Yes, we would get a car in the morning and often have the same car to drive home.  (Caution: You can’t assume that you own the same car for the day so be sure to take all your belongings with you at all times.)

We even used the navigation system at the beginning (we don’t have one in either of our cars) and it worked well (except we couldn’t figure out how to get it to talk to us) but by the third day we had the lay off the land, so didn’t need it.

It was great for grocery shopping as we could walk there and grab a car2go for about $4 and be back with our bags of food and adult refreshments in our Airbnb apartment in minutes.  

We also found by using car2go rather than walking 15 to 20 km a day, we were more rested and keen to check out Austin’s music venues at night.

One of the biggest surprises in Austin was that the residential streets (at least in our area), have poor or no sidewalks and lighting is minimal.  I mean the streets are pitch black (“bring a flashlight” black).  There is no way you want to walk home after dark. Car2go was the perfect way to check out Austin’s music venues, which often start with a Happy Hour at 6:30pm, then a headliner at 10pm and a nightcap band at midnight.

  Sunday afternoon at Saxon's Pub was a definitely one of the highlights of our trip. We probably wouldn't have made it here if not for car2go.

Sunday afternoon at Saxon's Pub was a definitely one of the highlights of our trip. We probably wouldn't have made it here if not for car2go.

Last Word

Overall, car2go allowed us to make better use of our time and energy, and develop a better appreciation of all Austin has to offer. Using car2go and staying in an Airbnb, we really felt like we were locals for two weeks.

I can definitely see us using car2go in Calgary and when we are planning future trips. 

If you like this blog, you will like:

Austin's Weird & Wonderful Outdoor Art Gallery

Ten commandments of a flaneur

Get "Off The Beaten Path" with these tips!

University of Texas: Backpack Fashion Show

One of the things we love to do when visiting a new city is to flaneur the university campus. We love the youthful vibrancy and are usually rewarded with a few surprises. We made some very interesting discoveries when flaneuring post-secondary campuses (see links at end of blog).  

So when in Austin, we decided to spend a Thursday morning checking out the Blanton Art Museum (free all day Thursday) and then flaneur the campus to see what hidden gems we cold find.

After finishing wandering the museum (highly recommended), we just followed the student pedestrian traffic into the centre of campus. Quickly we were swarmed by students trying to give us free stuff.  I still have no clue what was going on or why they were giving away things.

I think there is only one student in this photo who doesn't have a backpack.

Button Making Fun For Everyone!

Eventually, we did stop for four young women, who didn’t want any money, who asked us if we wanted to make personalize buttons for free. Who could resist?  In the end we made five and took a sixth one from their pre-made bin.  They didn’t want to take any money, but we gave them a donation.

Who could resist these smiles and the opportunity to make art buttons?

Backpacks Gone Wild

We wandered a bit further and the foot traffic was incredible, it was literally like an ant farm. Maybe a better analogy would be like a NYC subway station at rush hour.  We decided to just sit and absorb the amazing energy.  

After a few minutes I said to Brenda “I bet 90% of the students are wearing backpacks.” She looked around and said, “I bet it is higher. I am having a hard time finding a single student who doesn’t have one.”  

We then wondered when did the backpack become such an integral part of our everyday lives.  We often laugh when we walk by elementary schools and the backpack is almost as big as the child. It seems like people young and old don’t go anywhere these days without a backpack.

Backpack as a fashion statement!

If you Google “ What does your backpack say about you?” you will get over 34 million results in 1 second. 

I am not going to bore you with what they had to say. But I have integrated some fashion quotes with the postcard images that I thought might stimulate some backpack as a fashion statement thinking.

Has the backpack has become not only critical to our everyday life, but is it also a fashion statement. 

Below is a small sample of the backpack fashion show we experience at lunch at the University of Texas, Austin, campus on March 3, 2016. I hope you enjoy the show. 

Coco Chanel

'Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening.'

Marilyn Monroe

'Give a girl the right shoes (backpack) and she can conquer the world.'

Christian Dior

'You can never take too much care over the choice of your shoes. Too many women think that they are unimportant, but the real proof of an elegant woman is what is on her feet (should that be her back).'

Alexander Wang

Anyone can get dressed up and glamorous, but it is how people dress in their days off that are the most intriguing.'

Orson Welles


Style is knowing who you are, what you want to say, and not giving a damn.'

Backpack makes subtle political/social statement.

Love me, love my backpack

Michelle Obama

'If I can have any impact, I want women to feel good about themselves and have fun with fashion'

If you like this blog, you will like:

A-mazing University of New Mexico campus

Footnotes: University of Arizona: Resort vs Research

As chance would have it the next day I was heading to Cafe Medici for a cup of java and passing the Mathews Elementary School I was treated to another back back fashion show. 


Austin is more fun than weird!

While Austin’s moniker is “Keep Austin Weird,” I have not found anything about this city that I would call weird. On the other hand, I have found lots of fun things, which in my mind is even better as “Fun” appeals to more people than “Weird.”  

One of the first things we encountered as we headed out on the sidewalks was a neon sign “Wiggy’s Beer Wine” and thought “That’s Fun!”  Then we came upon a giant gorilla on the next block, which was an obvious “Kodak Moment.” And from there it was some fun fruit sculptures on the top of a parkade. This was all within the first 30 minutes.

One of Brenda’s observations about Austin is that it is a bit like Vegas with lots of neon signs everywhere.  While Austin’s neon signs are not big, bold and flashy like Vegas, they are fun and charming. And yes there are everywhere even in the ‘burbs. Neon is always fun.

For the first few days it seemed like it was just one fun thing after another. Here are our baker’s dozen “Austin is Fun” postcards.  

Established in 1973, the Wiggly Beer Wine neon sign marks the entrance to a tiny liquor store at the gateway to downtown along 6th Street West. 

Every city needs a good local fried chicken spot, Austin has many. Fresa's is take out only and is just a block from the Hope Outdoor Gallery, making it a popular spot with the picnickers. 

I told you Austin had more than one fried chicken spot.  This sign has is the most literal reference to Vegas. 

The name says it all - WAHOO!

Found this on a bottom shelf at HalfPrice Books at 5555 N Lamar.  Now that funny!

Found Lucy on the roof of a shop along South Congress. Lucy is fun and the play on the Beatles song is also fun. 

I have not clue what these are doing on the roof of parkade. This you could call "weird." 

Another fun name and sign of a business along South Congress in Austin. 

Every city has painted utility boxes these days, but Austin's have a fun twist.  Found these in the Clarksville community where we are staying in an apartment Airbnb. Love the cartoon narrative.  

Even the thrift stores get into Austin'd spirit of fun.  This is just one of dozens of chandeliers in the St. Vincent de Paul Thrift Store on South Congress. 

How fun is a bowling ball fence? 

This was the best thrift store we found in Austin. Very good product, lovely displays and good prices.  What is with the roof-top artworks? 

Airstream trailers are everywhere in Austin. You can find them in backyards and front yards on Airbnb. You can find them downtown selling custom designed boots. You can find them selling Big. Fat. Donuts! I even found one at a construction site office. 

West Austin Park pool looks lovely in winter but it only open in summer.

Last Word

We did find one weird thing about Austin and it is that  the lovely neighbourhood pool in the West Austin Park near our Airbnb (aka Austin home) is only open for two or three months in the summer.  What is weird is there is beautiful clean water in the pool year-round and it is +30 in March why wouldn't it be open now.  We asked locals and they also thought it was weird. 

If you like this blog, you will like:

Las Vegas: Neon boneyard fun!

Colorado Springs: Fun! Funky! Quirky!

Downtown Spokane is fun!

Austin: Isamu Taniguchi Japanese Garden

From Zilker Garden website: "Opened to the public in 1969, the Garden was built by Mr. Taniguchi when he was seventy years old. Working without a salary or a contract, Mr. Taniguchi spent 18 months transforming 3 acres of rugged caliche hillside into a peaceful garden. As is often done in Japan, the ponds were designed in the shape of a word or ideogram. In this case, the ponds in the first half of the garden spell out the word "AUSTIN", reflecting the fact that these gardens were constructed as a gift to the city. The remains of the Mother Tree, which inspired Mr. Taniguchi to complete his building of the garden, overlooks the pond.

The Togetsu-kyo bridge or "Bridge to Walk Over the Moon" is theoretically positioned so that, when the moon is high, it reflects in the water and follows you across the bridge. The idea is that as you gaze at the reflection of the moon on the water's surface, ultimate universal beauty will be revealed to you."

Indeed, the Japanese Garden was the highlight of our visit to the Zilker Park's Botanical Garden. In fact, the rest of the garden was a bit of a disappointment even though irises and some trees and shrubs were flowers were out in the neighbourhood gardens there wasn't any flowers in the rest of the garden.  In fact, much of the garden looked like it needed a good weeding.  The children's garden was just sad.  Enough said!

Here are a baker's dozen of postcards from Isamu Taniguchi's Japanese Garden. Hope you enjoy!

under bridge

Dog Parks foster a sense of community?

Though I am not a dog owner, I have regularly dog sat for friends over the past few years. Every time I do, I become more intrigued by how dog parks foster a stronger sense of community than any other public space I know.

Most of my experience has been at River Park in Altadore, which until recently, I thought was a dog park. But apparently, a dog park is “a fully fenced and gated space designed specifically for owners to allow their dogs off-leash.” Calgary actually has no dog parks; rather we have “off-leash” areas in multi-use parks where dogs are allowed off-leash under the full control of the owner.  

Winter dog walking can be a community event. 

 

River Park Happiness

A dog park is a place to reflect.

That being said, I estimate 95% of the people using River Park are dog owners and I am always impressed by how friendly people are - often stopping to chat, sometimes briefly, sometimes longer.  Sometimes we even start walking with these strangers; this never happens in other parks, except playgrounds.

In fact, many sociologists and urbanists think dogs are “the new children.”  Simon O’Byrne, Vice-President, Urban Planning at Stantec in Edmonton strongly believes North American cities need to focus on building more infrastructures to accommodate dogs in urban centres.  O’Byrne sees dogs as a “social lubricant,” facilitating social interaction between strangers as one sees the same people at the dog park and after two or three encounters, they start to build friendships.

I am also always impressed by the diversity of people off-leash areas attract (young families with strollers to seniors in wheelchairs, kids learning to ride bikes to empty nesters to young adults with new dogs) – much more diverse than playgrounds.

In the summer River Park is full of people and their dogs, enjoying a relaxing stroll along it 1 km rolling terrain. 

An added bonus: dogs and off-leash areas get people of all ages out walking on a regular basis and at all times of the day. Recently on a dark cold Sunday night, I encountered dozens of people were walking their dogs and chatting in River Park as if it was summertime.

People in off-leash areas also seem happier than people I walk by on sidewalks or in parks, pathways and plazas – as measured by their aptness to saying “hi” or smile as they pass by.  Perhaps the happiness of the dogs (just say“walk” to a dog and see his/her reaction) rubs off on their owners - happy dog, happy owner?

In the spring River Park takes on a wonderful pastoral ambience for both dog walkers and non-dog walkers.

Even in the middle of the winter when it is bitterly cold, people are out walking their dog.

 

Research says...

This fire hydrant sits outside the private dog park (see in the background) across the street from Las Vegas' Container Park.  The hydant is interactive so kids can turn the water fountain off and on.  How fun is that?

I checked in with one of Calgary’s leading dog culture researchers Ann Madeline Toohey, a PhD candidate at the University of Calgary exploring public health aspects of dog walking, to see what evidence exists to support my observations.

Toohey pointed me to studies that showed people feeling more secure walking with a dog, especially women walking alone. Even people without dogs felt more trusting of a stranger who is walking a dog and more secure about frequenting public spaces when they know others (e.g. dog walkers) will also be using it.  In fact, Toohey’s research confirmed regular dog walkers are more likely to view their neighbourhoods in a positive light.

Another interesting finding, especially in light of our aging population, is that off-leash areas can be desirable destinations for older adults wanting to remain in close contact with dogs, even when they are unable to have their own dog.

Calgary's Best Practices

Calgary is a model city for dog culture research given about 30% of homes have dogs - consistent with other cities in Canada and elsewhere. Calgary has designated 150 off-leash sites in parks across the city (over 17% of all total public open space).

“The City is challenged to provide enough off-leash parkland to meet demand and to ‘spread out’ the use of off-leash areas to minimize the degradation of green spaces due to overuse. As a result Calgary may have more off-leash parks than any other city in North America,” says Toohey. She adds “many of Calgary’s popular off-leash parks are very large making them conducive to longer walks (healthier for both dogs and humans) moreso than some of the urban off-leash parks I’ve seen in Chicago and Portland.” 

Calgary has many of these wonderful treed spaces in inner-city communities that are fun places for humans and their dogs to explore.

Toohey and her colleagues applaud the City’s Off-leash Ambassador Program, which educates dog owners on the importance of complying with off-leash rules, and provide free on-site dog training skills. The program has caught the interest of other municipalities

As well, Calgary’s Responsible Pet Ownership Bylaw one of the most comprehensive of any city in North America aims to minimize conflict, nuisance, injury and exclusion. But because Calgary’s off-leash dog areas are spread across the city in shared public parks, it is challenging for Parks and Bylaw Services personnel to minimize conflict and infractions.

Naomi Lakritz, in a Calgary Herald editorial wrote a compelling piece last April about why she doesn’t take her dog to off-leash parks anymore.  She cited filth (i.e. dog owners not picking up after their dogs) as the number one reason, followed by people not controlling their dogs when they get aggressive. These two negatives are supported by Toohey’s citywide research, with other negatives being homeowners next to off-leash parks becoming frustrated by increased traffic, parking and noise.

River Park dog walkers add a personal touch to the park at Christmas.

Why can't we share?

I agree with O’Byrne - if we want to enhance street and public space vitality and safety, as well as get the biggest bang for our public space infrastructure buck, we should add more dog-friendly amenities.  He noted Edmonton’s first new downtown park in decades (formerly a small gravel parking lot) will incorporate areas for dogs and kids to play.

Dogs sharing water fountain as River Park.

Construction begins this spring on Calgary’s first truly urban dog park. The size of a hockey rink, it will be incorporated into Connaught Park Thomson ark (14th Avenue and 11th Street SW). Canada Lands Corporation, learning many potential Currie Barracks home purchasers wanted a dog park, is now redesigning one of the planned parks to incorporate one.

Personally, I wonder why we can’t convert more of our urban parks and playgrounds into children/dog parks (as dogs are the new kids and many families would love to be able to walk the dog and kids as the same time). I can’t help but think parks surrounded by condos like the Barb Scott Park in the Beltline (12th Ave and 9th St SW) would get more use if it included an off-leash area, as would Century Gardens (8th Ave and 8th Street SW), slated for redesign.

In Calgary, a recent proposal to create an official off-leash area, as part of the Westmount Park next to Memorial Drive off ramp to Crowchild Trail, was unsuccessful due to the existence of a playground and a temporary outdoor skating rink, despite the greatest current users of the park being dog owners (42%) vs. 34% for the playground.

Calgary’s bylaw explicitly prohibits dogs from playgrounds and playing fields. Toohey said, “As public health researchers, we are committed to exploring ways to create parks that accommodate multiple users (families, seniors and teens) and activities (playgrounds, field games, dog walking and sitting), while reducing potential negative interactions between different user groups. We don’t want to encourage one type of activity that is detrimental to another activity because of safety concerns.”

Last Word

Too bad we can’t find a way to safely share our parks!

It would sure help if  dog owners did a better job of picking up after your dog. My rule is when I am at the park I pick up one of my dogs and one other.  Just like in golf, you fix one of your ball marks and one other.  

And please, please, keep a close eye on your dog to make sure s/he is always on their best behavour. 

Note: An edited version of this blog appeared in the Calgary Herald, Feb 27, 2016 titled "Dog parks sniff out ways to share public space." 

 

 

 

 

 

Austin's Wonderful, Wacky & Weird Outdoor Art Gallery

I had read about and seen pictures of Austin’s Hope Outdoor Gallery (HOG), but they did not prepare me for the three-storey outdoor graffiti gallery located on an abandon inner-city lot on the side of hill over-looking downtown.

Backstory: I love graffiti art. I even travelled from Gleichen, Alberta to New York City in the early ‘80s to experience graffiti art in its heyday - from subway cars to upscale art galleries. I came back and created several graffiti murals on the sides of buildings in Gleichen as well as incorporated it into my studio painting.  That was another life.

The view from the top gives you a sense of the height and scale of the project.  

From The Top

Found this spray can at the top of the Gallery, inviting me to contribute.  I am tempted to go back. 

We entered from the top of the gallery, which is not the usual entrance, which is at the bottom along Baylor Street at 11th Street. We were walking from our Clarksville Airbnb apartment so I knew we could get there taking the back route, but couldn’t quite find it. 

Knowing we were close and seeing a fireman getting out of his car at a charming historic fire station we asked him how to get to the outdoor gallery. He pointed and said, “Go to the end of the No Outlet (aka cul de sac) street that we had just passed and you will be at the top.” He also warned us to be careful if we tried to walk down as the area is badly washed out. Oh those fireman, they are always looking out for everyone’s safety.

Heading down the street we first came upon a wonderful castle-looking estate over looking the city. We soon found out its the offices of Castel Hill Partners and wondered how they liked being next to a graffiti park?

Fast-forward: When I got back to do some more research on the park, turns out Castel Hill Partners own the land, are land developers and are obviously just waiting to develop it.  I could help but wondered why they aren’t worried about the liabilities associated with letting people climb up and down their property. Somebody could easily get hurt and there are no signs saying, “use at your own risk.”

Jackson Pollock & Graffiti Art

Once we reached the edge it wasn’t as dangerous as the fireman suggested, but yes you have to be careful.  The view of the city was spectacular and the park is a kaleidoscope of colour.  It is definitely more of a graffiti park than a street art park as there are only a few areas where an individual artist’s work has been left untouched. Rather it is just layer upon layer of lines, squiggles and words in a cacophony of random colours - a Jackson Pollock-like mega 3D painting.

This was my favourite spot as you could play with the perspective of the window opening in the concrete foundation.

The intensity can be a sight for sore eyes.

Found this young lady hiding in the shadows. One of the few artworks that hadn't been covered with graffiti. 

Perfect place to sit and chat.

Found this artist putting some final touches on his contribution.

Perfect place to meet friends for a picnic.

The Gallery has many walls to create lots of different galleries. Note you can see the castle in at the top in the background.

This is the proper entrance to the Hope Outdoor Gallery on Baylor St. at 11th St. 

Better Than Public Art

I loved the scale, the energy, unique sense of place and randomness of the Hope Outdoor Gallery (HOG). While we were there a street artist was being interviewed about his work, there were lots of people milling about and even friends having a picnic.  We went by the next day which was a Saturday and it was even busier. It is heaven for urban photographers.

HOG is better than most public artworks that quickly become just a part of the urban landscape and ignored by pedestrians. HOG is an ever-changing artwork that challenges people to literally explore it and to participate.  I have now visited three times and each time I have discovered something new and always there are a dozen of so people actively looking at the art and trying to make sense of it. 

I am thinking it would be a wonderful and weird place for wedding pictures. Hey this Austin, I am thinking it has happened more than once.

If you like this blog, you will like:

Public Art vs Street Art: Calgary, Florence, Rome

Freakn Fun at Freak Alley in Boise

2015: Everyday Tourist Best Skyscape photos

Over the past year, I have been treated to some some amazingly works of art created by Mother Nature.  For the most part these are not your romantic sunsets and sunrises, but rather dramatic moments that have been part of my a everyday experiences in 2015.  I hope you find them interesting. 

Stanley Glacier Hike

Fire Sky, my backyard, West Hillhurst, Calgary 

Approaching storm, Altadore, Calgary

Morning Reflection, Elbow River, Calgary

Ripple Clouds, Grand Trunk Park, my front yard, Calgary

Deep Blue Sunset, University District, Calgary

Pink Clouds Over Crowchild Trail, Calgary (my street) 

Spirit Cloud, Redwood Meadows

Wings Over the Bow River, East Village, Calgary

Downtown Heart, Calgary (took this photo for the Hula Girl, only when I got home did I see the heart-shaped cloud)

Exploding Cloud over Grand Trunk Park, Calgary

Morning sky over downtown Calgary, from St. Andrew's Heights 

Chinook Arch, River Park, Calgary 

Burning Morning, Elbow River, Calgary

2015: Everyday Tourist Best Flaneuring Photos

My 2014 Christmas gift to myself was a Sony RX100 camera which, along with two iPhones, were put to good use (some might not agree, particularly my Redwood golfing buddies who were always asking “what are you taking a picture of now?”) last year taking 12,682 photos.

I love surfing through my photos on an almost daily basis. It is like a visual diary of both being both a tourist in other cities and an everyday flaneur in and around Calgary. It is fun reliving and rethinking where you have been.

As 2015 came to a close I started to reflect on the highlights of 2015.  After spending hours reviewing my photos and wondering if I could reduce 2015 to just 10 photos.  (I love top ten lists) I came to the conclusion that was impossible for me. I have never been a good editor. 

I then thought maybe I could do a couple of top ten lists based on certain subjects and activities with some common denominators.  After identifying about 250 favourite images (about 2% of the 2015 portfolio) seven subjects surfaced.

So rather than one large blog with dozen of images, I created seven subject specific blogs that reflect the fun and surprises of being an everyday tourist and flaneur in 2015.  

Black & White Narratives

I was surprised at how many black and white photos I took in 2015 and how many still captured my interest.  There is something about black and white images that elevates the drama of everyday life. While some readers have said the black and white images are depressing and sad, others love the quality of light and sense of the narrative that is revealed in them.

Architecture As Art

My architectural photos rarely isolate a single building into a static documentary image, but rather focus on the interplay of design, styles and built forms.  I am always looking for a different perspective that captures an artistic interpretation of architecture.

Flaneuring Fun

I love wandering the streets wherever I am, looking for urban surprises and usually I am not disappointed.  It could be anything from a dandelion gone to seed illuminated by a setting sun to fun doorway.  I love the thrill of the hunt.

Playgrounds

I have always loved the colour and sense of joy that happens at community playgrounds.  This year I bonded with the little guy next-door (he will be 2 years old in January 2016) and explored literally dozens of playgrounds all within a short walk of our house.  As a result I have made a point over the past year to visit as many playgrounds as I can both in Calgary and beyond.

Street People

One of my goals for 2015 was to capture the everyday urban life of the street, plaza, park and pathway, while respecting everyone’s privacy.

Street Art / Public Art Surprises

Expect the unexpected as my street art and public art photos are not just about sculptures and statues, rather how art can be found in strange places like amazing collages created in the reflections of storefront windows.

Skyscapes

Over the past year, I have been treated to some some amazingly works of art created by Mother Nature.  For the most part these are not your romantic sunsets and sunrises, but rather dramatic moments that are part of one’s everyday experiences.

Last Word

I hope you will enjoy these compilations as much as I have in putting them together.   As always, comments are welcomed.  Feel free to share with me some of your favourite photos of 2015.

Editor’s Note: I will be posting a new 2015 Best Everyday Tourist Photos blog each Sunday beginning January 3rd.

 

This is the entrance to the Pixel condominiums in Sunnyside, Calgary. Very cool!

Exquisite Form collage found at the Fremont Sunday Flea Market in Seattle.  Highly recommended if you are in Seattle on a Sunday.

Loved the juxtaposition of the modern spirit figure workart and the old church in Mexico City. The ironic thing was I had seen the artwork in the alley next to the Toy Museum in another part of the city the day before. 

Found this lovely green trail in the playing field in Calgary's Parkdale community.  It was a great summer evening flaneur as we also found the outdoor hockey rink had been converted to a beach volley ball pitch, a new community garden had been created next to the community centre and a local gardener invited us to inspect his backyard garden.  Flavouring doesn't get any better than that. 

Found these Christmas lights in Briar Hill...never did get to see them on at night. 

Found this lovely green beach along the Elbow River in Calgary's Stanley Park community. 

Loved the evening light on the overgrown stairs going up to the front entrance of a home in Calgary's Hounsfield Heights community. 

I am fascinated by the names of mid-century condos in Calgary's inner-city communities.  This might just be the best one, found in Sunalta.  Whycocomah is Scottish and three is a rural community in Nova Scotia with the same name next to the We'koqma'q First Nations community. 

Found some amazing gardens in Port Angeles walking back from their Art Park. 

There was a wonderful tranquility around this spiral of rock on the huge gravel bar at next to the busy Memorial Drive and Crowchild Trail intersection. 

Found this happy fence, when taking Rossi for a walk in the River Park dog park. 

Found this Bow River fisherman in a suit and tie one Sunday afternoon. 

The Elbow River looked like it was on fire on morning when walking Rossi along the ridge at River Park dog park. 

I love finding art in strange places. This is close up of a mural painting on the wall on the second floor of the Interfaith Furniture Store. 

Found these in the field that will soon be Calgary's newest inner-city community - University District.  Looks like someone has already moved in. 

This sunset dandelion just appeared to me as we were walking along the streets of West Hillhurst, Calgary. 

Found this flower sculpture in a garden along one of our summer evening walks.