Calgary's Centre City Plan Revisited: Where diversity thrives?

Kudos to the City for taking the initiative to update the 2007 Centre City Plan rather than letting it gather dust.  Visions and urban plans often reflect the mood of the city at the time they are developed.

In 2007, Calgary’s City Centre was in a boom, today there is a feeling of doom, so there could be major changes. 

Screen Shot 2018-12-10 at 3.37.07 PM.png

Refresh?

Over the past six months the City has conducted what they call a “strategic foresight” process with various Centre City stakeholders to gather information, ideas, issues, opportunities so they can update the Center City Plan.  A draft of what they are calling “The Future of Calgary’s Center City: 2038 Through a Strategic Foresight Lens” is in the process of being developed and will be shared with the public and stakeholders in 2019 for more feedback.  

Link: City Centre Plan Refresh

There are big challenges facing the City Centre’s private and public stakeholders today – aging public buildings and spaces, contaminated land in West Village and thousands of empty office spaces to name a few. 

One might even ask: “Is Centre City the right name?” and “Do we have the right boundaries?” Perhaps we should revise the plan to accommodate a decline versus growth of our City Center. 

Let’s have a look.

Screen Shot 2018-12-10 at 3.32.16 PM.png

Name / Boundary Change 

Screen Shot 2019-01-01 at 12.47.20 PM.png

The first two changes I would make would be to change the name and boundaries.  

The name “Centre City” is confusing as most cities refer to the area around their Central Business District (CBD) as the City Centre and most of Calgary’s directional signage says “City Centre.

I wish urban planners would come up with a common terminology as it would help the public better understand what they are talking about. 

Calgary’s City Center should include Sunalta, Hillhurst/Sunnyside, Bridgeland/Riverside, Mission, Cliff Bungalow, Erlton and Inglewood.

All of these communities share many of the same development issues and opportunities as those in the current Centre City Plan. 

Screen Shot 2018-12-01 at 5.43.19 PM.png
Calgary’s City Centre is a much larger area than what the City’s current Centre City plan includes.

Calgary’s City Centre is a much larger area than what the City’s current Centre City plan includes.

Parking to People

Perhaps the biggest change since 2007 is the renaissance of urban living in the Centre City with dozens of new residential developments replacing surface parking.  

Anthem’s Waterfront project with 1,000+ condos is the largest condo project in the city’s history. The Le Germain condos sold out quickly at $1,000 per square foot, in 2010. Qualex Landmark alone has completed six condo buildings (1,298 suites) in the Beltline over the past 10 years.  And the East Village’s sea of parking is quickly disappearing. 

Since 2007: 

  • Residents increased by 31% 

  • Residences increased by 46% 

  • Children under the age of 15 increased by 131% 

One of several illustrations from the current Centre City Plan.

One of several illustrations from the current Centre City Plan.

Boom to Gloom 

Ten years ago, the City Center was booming, plans were being finalized for East Village, National Music Centre, new Central Library and West LRT. 

Everyone was excited about the possibility of the new RiverWalk, St. Patrick’s Island renovations and construction of the new George C. King Bridge.   

Bow Valley College was looking at a major expansion of its City Centre campus and the University of Calgary has just established its downtown presence.  

It was also boom time for new office buildings, plans for the Bow were announce in 2006 and the conversion of Penny Lane Mall into the elegant Eight Avenue Place were underway.

Fast forward to today and no new pipelines, the rise of the US oil & gas production has resulted in the collapse of Calgary as a major international oil and gas headquarters. The loss of 30,000 jobs and the construction of several mega office buildings has resulted 25% of downtown’s office space being empty.  The loss of property tax revenue City Centre office buildings has created a city wide tax crisis.  

Since 2007, Calgary’s City Centre has evolved from boom to doom and gloom. 

East Village’s new Studio Bell museum didn’t exist in 2007.

East Village’s new Studio Bell museum didn’t exist in 2007.

East Village’s new condos didn’t exist in 2007.

East Village’s new condos didn’t exist in 2007.

Downtown’s 7th Avenue transit corridor has been significantly improved since 2007.

Downtown’s 7th Avenue transit corridor has been significantly improved since 2007.

Unfortunately, downtown’s once hot business economy has turned cold since 2007.

Unfortunately, downtown’s once hot business economy has turned cold since 2007.

Big Challenges

Over the next 10 years our City Centre’s public and private leaders will have to tackle the following challenges, with a lot less tax revenue than in 2007.  

  • How to ensure the Green Line is a catalyst for private investment? 

  • Will Victoria Park revitalization including the new arena and expanded BMO center will be Calgary’s next East Village?  And what impact will that have on the much needed Arts Commons, Glenbow Museum and Olympic Plaza upgrades.  

  • Is there room for both the Calgary TELUS Convention Centre and BMO centre in the future. 

  • Stephen Avenue needs a major makeover to better accommodate pedestrians, cyclist and evening traffic which was not part of the original design. Perhaps extend it all the way to 8th or 11th Street SW. 

  • Do we finally clean up the creosote in West Village? Is there a need for West Village?

  • How to fill-up or redevelop the 10+ million square feet of empty office space for new uses. 

  • Will there be a demand for more residential development if the downtown core doesn’t recover?

How Victoria Park and Stampede Park could evolve over the next 20 years?

How Victoria Park and Stampede Park could evolve over the next 20 years?

Concept drawing for new BMO Convention / Event Centre at Stampede Park. Construction could begin in 2019.

Concept drawing for new BMO Convention / Event Centre at Stampede Park. Construction could begin in 2019.

The new Green Line will add a new dimension to the Centre City as it passes underground through downtown.

The new Green Line will add a new dimension to the Centre City as it passes underground through downtown.

Screen Shot 2019-01-01 at 12.55.45 PM.png

Last Word

The Centre City Plan vision statement reads:

“To make Centre City a livable, caring and thriving place: That is a premier urban living environment; That is a national and global centre of business; That is a centre for the arts, culture, recreation, tourism and entertainment, and; That welcomes people, in all their diversity, to live, work and visit here.”

It is a nice convoluted motherhood statement. However, I was once told a good vision statement is no longer than about 10 words and should be something aspiring, memorable and something everyone can recite easily. 

May I suggest:

“A City Centre where diversity thrives!”

Diversity to me includes: a diversity of housing options, diversity of businesses (sizes and sectors), diversity of parks and public spaces, diversity of festivals and events, diversity of entertainment/arts, diversity of restaurants/retail, a diversity of streets, a diversity of transportation options and a diversity of architecture (old and new). 

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

All downtowns must reinvent themselves

Calgary: The World’s Most Walkable City Centre

Calgary’s City Centre on of the best in North America

 

 

Everyday Tourist's Best Flaneur Finds of 2018

For those of you who follow me on Twitter, you will have seen some of these photos as I often tweet out my “Best Flaneur Finds” when I get home from a day of wandering. Sometimes it is just one photo, sometimes as many as four.

I thought it would be fun to collect some of the best “Flaneur Finds” of 2018 in a blog and share with those who aren’t on Twitter.

Hope you enjoy!

Link: Ten Commandments Of A Flaneur

This huge rubric cube (sorry it isn’t functional, that would be very cool) in Calgary’s Beltline is a fun surprise to those driving and walking by.

This huge rubric cube (sorry it isn’t functional, that would be very cool) in Calgary’s Beltline is a fun surprise to those driving and walking by.

I had to smile when I found this Pegasus figure in the yard of a scaffolding warehouse in Calgary’s Manchester community. How clever? Is this public art? I say “Yes!”

I had to smile when I found this Pegasus figure in the yard of a scaffolding warehouse in Calgary’s Manchester community. How clever? Is this public art? I say “Yes!”

I love public art that is fun, clever and in unexpected places…more of this please in 2019!  Calgary’s  +15 indoor walkway was full of art, it is Canada’s most unique public art gallery.

I love public art that is fun, clever and in unexpected places…more of this please in 2019! Calgary’s +15 indoor walkway was full of art, it is Canada’s most unique public art gallery.

Loved this whirly-gig artwork along Atlanta’s Beltline multi-use pathway. Love to see more of this in 2019!

Loved this whirly-gig artwork along Atlanta’s Beltline multi-use pathway. Love to see more of this in 2019!

Further along Atlanta’s Beltline I found this banner on a construction site. Love to see more of this at construction sites….simple to do and thoughtful!

Further along Atlanta’s Beltline I found this banner on a construction site. Love to see more of this at construction sites….simple to do and thoughtful!

This mirrored cash machine on the plaza outside an Atlanta office building is a stroke of genius. It became an ever changing sculpture that animated the plaza is a way a static sculpture could never do. Why don’t we see more of this?

This mirrored cash machine on the plaza outside an Atlanta office building is a stroke of genius. It became an ever changing sculpture that animated the plaza is a way a static sculpture could never do. Why don’t we see more of this?

Downtown Calgary’s architecture is full of intriguing patterns, textures and juxtaposition. Remember to always look up!

Downtown Calgary’s architecture is full of intriguing patterns, textures and juxtaposition. Remember to always look up!

The patina and words on this door in Hamilton harkens back to a different time.

The patina and words on this door in Hamilton harkens back to a different time.

A free philosophy lesson in Saskatoon’s downtown warehouse district.

A free philosophy lesson in Saskatoon’s downtown warehouse district.

Found this friendly, front yard in Calgary’s Parkdale community. Love the free Little Libraries I find everywhere I go. I hope the addition of front yard seating will also catch on. How pedestrian friendly is this?

Found this friendly, front yard in Calgary’s Parkdale community. Love the free Little Libraries I find everywhere I go. I hope the addition of front yard seating will also catch on. How pedestrian friendly is this?

Love this play on the term “couch potato” by Regina artist, Victor Cicansky in the window at the Glenbow in downtown Calgary. It had a personal meaning for me as I have small Cicansky piece of a chair with a potato in our collection. I must get to the Glenbow more in 2019!

Love this play on the term “couch potato” by Regina artist, Victor Cicansky in the window at the Glenbow in downtown Calgary. It had a personal meaning for me as I have small Cicansky piece of a chair with a potato in our collection. I must get to the Glenbow more in 2019!

By chance I looked out the window of my financial advisor’s office in downtown Calgary and saw this amazing view of the sky-light of The Core shopping centre. It is the longest point supported structural skylight in the world. Not sure exactly what that means, but it is impressive inside and out. Remember to always look out the window in 2019!

By chance I looked out the window of my financial advisor’s office in downtown Calgary and saw this amazing view of the sky-light of The Core shopping centre. It is the longest point supported structural skylight in the world. Not sure exactly what that means, but it is impressive inside and out. Remember to always look out the window in 2019!

Speaking of windows, I love the giant abstract / surrealistic art created by the reflections in glass facades of contemporary office towers every time I wander downtown. They are like giant Dali paintings.

Speaking of windows, I love the giant abstract / surrealistic art created by the reflections in glass facades of contemporary office towers every time I wander downtown. They are like giant Dali paintings.

Found this little guy while golfing at Redwood Meadows. Yes golfing can be a flaneuring activity.

Found this little guy while golfing at Redwood Meadows. Yes golfing can be a flaneuring activity.

Went to explore a rock garden, found a cemetery and then this. Almost side by side were two similar graves one with my surname and one with that of our next door neighbour who we are very close to. Yikes….

Went to explore a rock garden, found a cemetery and then this. Almost side by side were two similar graves one with my surname and one with that of our next door neighbour who we are very close to. Yikes….

Found this carnival mask in the quaint Kensington Hardware store. One of the great things about flaneuring is find fun things in the strangest places.

Found this carnival mask in the quaint Kensington Hardware store. One of the great things about flaneuring is find fun things in the strangest places.

I didn’t remember taking this photo while on a walking tour of BUMP (Beltline Urban Mural Program). But when I got home and was flaneuring the photos I took that day I discovered this one and immediately thought “this could be the definitive portrait of happiness in the 21st century.”

I didn’t remember taking this photo while on a walking tour of BUMP (Beltline Urban Mural Program). But when I got home and was flaneuring the photos I took that day I discovered this one and immediately thought “this could be the definitive portrait of happiness in the 21st century.”

While wandering Inglewood’s funky Main Street I found this fun chair. Ironically, I have been looking for a Netflix binging chair for over a year. I didn’t have the balls to buy it!

While wandering Inglewood’s funky Main Street I found this fun chair. Ironically, I have been looking for a Netflix binging chair for over a year. I didn’t have the balls to buy it!

Found this strange shadow sidewalk art in downtown Calgary across from the Bow office tower. It is created by the ornamental chain-linked fence that surrounds a future building site. Kudos to the developer (I expect with some push from the City) to create something more ornamental vs ordinary. More of this in 2019 please!

Found this strange shadow sidewalk art in downtown Calgary across from the Bow office tower. It is created by the ornamental chain-linked fence that surrounds a future building site. Kudos to the developer (I expect with some push from the City) to create something more ornamental vs ordinary. More of this in 2019 please!

Was wandering Hamilton’s City Centre when this guy rides his bike up on the sidewalk behind me and says “what are you doing?” I was taking photo of house with a funky porch. Turns out it was his sister’s place. We chatted about flaneuring and then I noticed his rings. I asked if I could take a photo of him and his rings and he was happy to oblige.

Was wandering Hamilton’s City Centre when this guy rides his bike up on the sidewalk behind me and says “what are you doing?” I was taking photo of house with a funky porch. Turns out it was his sister’s place. We chatted about flaneuring and then I noticed his rings. I asked if I could take a photo of him and his rings and he was happy to oblige.

I love flaneuring the books at thrift stores as you find the most amazing juxtaposition of ideas, images and ideologies - like this one in Saskatoon.

I love flaneuring the books at thrift stores as you find the most amazing juxtaposition of ideas, images and ideologies - like this one in Saskatoon.

Found this while flaneuring in Halifax. It was in the gallery space of the Provincial Archives building and struck a cord with me as I love colour. Ironically the text and fame are black except for the word “outside?” Is this the artist’s subtle statement? Flaneuring can be thought provoking.

Found this while flaneuring in Halifax. It was in the gallery space of the Provincial Archives building and struck a cord with me as I love colour. Ironically the text and fame are black except for the word “outside?” Is this the artist’s subtle statement? Flaneuring can be thought provoking.

Another provocative flaneur find from Calgary’s Inglewood community. I have probably wander this street a dozen or more times and never noticed this small 1918 church with its tiny plaque above the door. The quote says, “Lift up a standard for the people.” Isa 62:10. with two soldier-like figures trying to plant a flag with waves crashing around them. Enough said?

Another provocative flaneur find from Calgary’s Inglewood community. I have probably wander this street a dozen or more times and never noticed this small 1918 church with its tiny plaque above the door. The quote says, “Lift up a standard for the people.” Isa 62:10. with two soldier-like figures trying to plant a flag with waves crashing around them. Enough said?

Another book shelf find, this time at the new Central Library in downtown Calgary. This would make for an interesting 2019 reading project.

Another book shelf find, this time at the new Central Library in downtown Calgary. This would make for an interesting 2019 reading project.

Found this in a display case at the Robert C. Williams Museum of Papermaking, on the campus of the Georgia Tech in Atlanta. If you are in Atlanta, the museum is definitely worth a visit.

Found this in a display case at the Robert C. Williams Museum of Papermaking, on the campus of the Georgia Tech in Atlanta. If you are in Atlanta, the museum is definitely worth a visit.

Last Word

If you haven’t tried flaneuring, I would encourage you to do so in 2019.

If you like this blog, you might like:

Calgary vs Halifax: Urban Playgrounds

I expect it would come as a surprise to many Calgarians (and Canadians) to learn there are a significant number of similarities between Halifax, a port city created as a military base in 1749 and Calgary, a land-locked, prairie city established as a Northwest Mounted Police Fort in 1875.  

Both are becoming fun urban playgrounds.

Halifax’s telephone poles are plastered with posters promoting various fun events. They create a playful streetscape.

Halifax’s telephone poles are plastered with posters promoting various fun events. They create a playful streetscape.

Halifax’s Sunday Flea Market at the old Forum, is very similar to Calgary’s Hillhurst/Sunnyside Flea Market also on Sunday.

Halifax’s Sunday Flea Market at the old Forum, is very similar to Calgary’s Hillhurst/Sunnyside Flea Market also on Sunday.

No Grand Street

The first similarity I found was the lack of a grand, ceremonial main street with a boulevard.  After a bit of wandering downtown, I stumbled upon Halifax’s Argyle Street which looks a lot like Calgary’s Stephen Avenue with its pedestrian-friendly sidewalks full of patios.  

It is home to Halifax’s shiny new convention centre and the iconic Neptune Theatre complex, not unlike Stephen Avenue’s Telus Convention Centre and Art Commons, our theatre complex.

Also, on Argyle Street is Halifax’s Grand Parade, a historic military parade square dating back to 1749, not unlike Calgary’s Olympic Plaza, albeit newer, anchoring the east end of Stephen Avenue. 

Halifax’s Argyle Street with its new convention centre office tower in the background has the mix of the old and the new reminded me of Calgary’s Stephen Avenue.

Halifax’s Argyle Street with its new convention centre office tower in the background has the mix of the old and the new reminded me of Calgary’s Stephen Avenue.

Historic information panels were scattered around the different City Centre neighbourhoods. It made for interesting flaneuring. Calgary does something similar on its electrical boxes.

Historic information panels were scattered around the different City Centre neighbourhoods. It made for interesting flaneuring. Calgary does something similar on its electrical boxes.

Hydrostone is charming neighbourhood with tree-lined boulevards and a quaint main street a fun place to flaneur.

Hydrostone is charming neighbourhood with tree-lined boulevards and a quaint main street a fun place to flaneur.

Urban Living 

Secondly, like Calgary, Halifax’s downtown is surrounded by several trendy residential communities each with their own main street, character and new condo buildings.   Spring Garden Road is a bit like Calgary’s Kensington, with its shops, restaurants and cafés along with its own urban park – Halifax Public Gardens, the equivalent of Kensington’s Riley Park.  

Then there’s Halifax’s North End Entertainment District, which has a lot in common with Calgary’s old Electric Avenue – a mix of bars, restaurants and cafes. The Local and Marquee Ballroom are popular live music venues, Propeller Brewing Company serves up some great beers and The Independent Mercantile Co would be right at home in Calgary’s design district. 

Quinpool Road, on the west side of Halifax’s downtown is like Calgary’s 17th Avenue SW in the 70s with its eclectic collection of “mom and pop” shops, many having been around since the 50s and 60s, yet on the cusp of change with numerous new shops opening and new condos in the works.   

Link: Quinpool is Cool

Then there is Halifax’s Hydrostone community, with the look and feel of Calgary’s Britannia Plaza, both feature an upscale one-block long main street of shops and restaurants, as well as a mix of new condos and old single family homes. It was named a Great Neighbourhood by The Canadian Institute of Planners in 2011.

The North End (not to be confused the North End Entertainment District) has much in common with Inglewood, with its mix of old and new shops including an Army & Navy Store that reminded me of Inglewood’s Crown Surplus store. And yes, the North End has craft breweries, a distillery and a cider shop that parallels Inglewood’s growing craft industries.

Spring Garden Road has a lovely mix of shops and architecture.

Spring Garden Road has a lovely mix of shops and architecture.

Halifax’s North End Entertainment District is in transition from a seedy to a funky street.

Halifax’s North End Entertainment District is in transition from a seedy to a funky street.

Agricola Street is Halifax’s hipster street.

Agricola Street is Halifax’s hipster street.

Halifax’s Public Garden is a lovely oasis in the middle of downtown even in late October. The Calgary equivalent is Riley Park.

Halifax’s Public Garden is a lovely oasis in the middle of downtown even in late October. The Calgary equivalent is Riley Park.

Downtown Attractions

Halifax’s Citadel shares much in common with Calgary’s Stampede Grounds/Fort Calgary area, both on the edge of downtown, each representing the historical beginning of their respective cities. While the Citadel sits on a hill overlooking the city and is impressive port, is certainly a more striking landmark than Fort Calgary, our Stampede Grounds are more integrated into the everyday life of its city with concerts, sporting and other events. 

Both cities have major waterfront attractions.  Halifax’s waterfront is home to the Canadian Museum of Immigration Pier 21, Seaport Farmer’s Market, Discovery Center, Cruise Ship Terminal and boardwalk shops.   

Calgary’s riverbanks (Bow & Elbow) are home to the Calgary Zoo, Telus Spark, Saddledome, Stampede Park and various river walks, promenades and pathways and three major parks (Shaw Millennium, Prince’s and St. Patrick Islands).

Halifax even has an iconic, funky new central library that is every bit as popular and spectacular as Calgary’s new central library.  With its at grade entrance and small plaza along Spring Garden Road, it is better integrated to its downtown.  It has two cafes, one at street level and a rooftop café with an outdoor patio that offers spectacular views of the city. Opened in 2014, it has already been the catalyst for two mixed-use developments, with street retail next door.  

The central library similarities don’t stop here. In both cities, the architects were not only chosen through an international design competition, but Scandinavian firms were chosen to work with a local firm.  Halifax chose local firm Fowler Bauld and Mitchell and Schmidt Hammer Lassen of Denmark and Calgary chose local firm DIALOG and Noregian firm Snohetta.  

At the Citadel these boys loved pretending they were soldiers.

At the Citadel these boys loved pretending they were soldiers.

Pier 21 Fun: Loved this installation at Pier 21 where you were invited to decorate your own mini piece of luggage and then hang it on the wall. Another installation was of luggage tags where visitors were invited to write their stories of immigration or thoughts about their Pier 21 experience and hang them on the wall.

Pier 21 Fun: Loved this installation at Pier 21 where you were invited to decorate your own mini piece of luggage and then hang it on the wall. Another installation was of luggage tags where visitors were invited to write their stories of immigration or thoughts about their Pier 21 experience and hang them on the wall.

Halifax’s Farmer’s Market is part of a huge urban renewal project that includes their Science Centre, Nova Scotia School of Art & Design, Pier 21 and Cruise Ship docks. It is the equivalent of Calgary’s East Village redevelopment.

Halifax’s Farmer’s Market is part of a huge urban renewal project that includes their Science Centre, Nova Scotia School of Art & Design, Pier 21 and Cruise Ship docks. It is the equivalent of Calgary’s East Village redevelopment.

Halifax’s new Central Library reminded me of shipping containers being stacked one on top of another, which is a perfect metaphor for the city as it is a major container port.

Halifax’s new Central Library reminded me of shipping containers being stacked one on top of another, which is a perfect metaphor for the city as it is a major container port.

Brenda loved the plum kuchen at the Gingerbread Haus Bakery (1138 Queen Street) so much we went there four times. They have the freshest sandwiches we have tasted in a long time and tasty soups.

Brenda loved the plum kuchen at the Gingerbread Haus Bakery (1138 Queen Street) so much we went there four times. They have the freshest sandwiches we have tasted in a long time and tasty soups.

I had to try the Red Coats pastry.

I had to try the Red Coats pastry.

Is 400,000 a magic number?

The more I wandered around Halifax, the more it had the feeling of Calgary in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s when our downtown was undergoing a mega transformation with construction on every block.  However, there is a big difference, instead of the 8 am to 6 pm weekday-oriented office buildings that dominate our downtown, Halifax is building residential right in the middle of its downtown.  

In addition, all of their urban pedestrian streets – Quinpool, Agricola, Gottingen and Spring Garden all have several new condos recently opened and more in the construction or planning stages on or nearby.  These new residential developments should enhance Halifax’s urban street life in the years to come. 

Everywhere we went in the City Centre, posted City signs notified neighbours of pending new mixed-use residential development applications. It was clear, Calgary isn’t the only place where tearing down 3 or 4 houses to build a new mid-rise condo in their place is happening.

It is interesting to note Calgary’s population in 1971 was just over 400,000 and Halifax’s today is also just over 400,000.  Perhaps there is something that happens when a city reaches the critical mass of 400,000 people that is the catalyst for urban renewal.  

The Halifax Commons is a huge park that has playing fields, a skateboard park and the Emera Oval that in is an ice skating oval in the winter and a roller blading, cycling oval in the summer. It even has FREE rentals for tourists who want to give it a try. The Caglary equivalent would be Shaw Millennium Park.

The Halifax Commons is a huge park that has playing fields, a skateboard park and the Emera Oval that in is an ice skating oval in the winter and a roller blading, cycling oval in the summer. It even has FREE rentals for tourists who want to give it a try. The Caglary equivalent would be Shaw Millennium Park.

Live music in the cafeteria at lunch at St. Mary’s University was a nice touch.

Live music in the cafeteria at lunch at St. Mary’s University was a nice touch.

Every Saturday afternoon Halifax’s Your Father’s Moustache restaurant hosts Joe Murphy and the Water Street Blues Band from 4 to 8 pm. and has been for 25+ years. It reminded us of the Mike Clark band at Calgary’s Mikey’s on 12th or Tim Williams at Blues Can.

Every Saturday afternoon Halifax’s Your Father’s Moustache restaurant hosts Joe Murphy and the Water Street Blues Band from 4 to 8 pm. and has been for 25+ years. It reminded us of the Mike Clark band at Calgary’s Mikey’s on 12th or Tim Williams at Blues Can.

Last Word

There is a definite sense of optimism in the air in Halifax. Posters were plastered on poles everywhere, advertising upcoming concerts, festivals and entertainment, sending a clear message that “things are happening here.”  

We got the feeling Halifax could well become Canada’s next “urban playground” - once they finish their mega makeover.

For more information on Halifax: Discover Halifax

For more information on Calgary: Tourism Calgary

Note: If you want to see photos and information on Calgary’s City Centre see the links below.

If you go:

We stayed a couple of nights at the Cambridges Suites Hotel which is very handy to downtown, Citadel, the waterfront and the Gingerbread Haus Bakery. Very comfy rooms and great breakfast.

We also stayed in a Airbnb on at 6034 Cunard St which was great for exploring the west and north sides of the City Centre - Quinpool and Agricola Streets and a lovely walk to Dalhousie and St. Mary’s universities and the Hydrostone district.

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Calgary: The world’s most walkable city centre!

Calgary’s City Centre: One of the best in North America!

Calgary’s Everyday Tourist’s Off The Beaten path picks.

 

 

Hey Calgarians you don’t own the street!

One of the biggest misconceptions by Calgary homeowners is that think they own the street parking in front of their house. They don’t.

It is a public parking space anybody can use. Unfortunately, by issuing residential parking permits for street parking, the City of Calgary gives home owners the impression street in front of their house indeed their personal parking spot.  

Note: An edited version of this blog was posted online as part of CBC Calgary’s “Road Ahead” feature on December 1st 2018.

Residential parking signs like this one is very common in Calgary’s inner-city streets. 39,000 households in Calgary have exclusive use of their street parking even though most have garages or parking pads in the alley.

Residential parking signs like this one is very common in Calgary’s inner-city streets. 39,000 households in Calgary have exclusive use of their street parking even though most have garages or parking pads in the alley.

No Free Parking?

And this is becoming a bigger problem as the City wants to diversify and densify our inner-city neighbourhoods as parking is a key barrier to new development. (We will get to this later.)

Street parking is a valuable asset the City must manage more creatively to enhance the vitality of our inner-city communities for both commercial and residential development.  

One idea could be to charge residents fair market rate for street parking and make street parking a bigger cash cow for the City! 

I always smile when I pass by this “One Minute” parking zone in West Hillhurst.

I always smile when I pass by this “One Minute” parking zone in West Hillhurst.

Cash Cow?

Residential Permit parking gives Calgarians the solid (and defendable!) position the street in front of their homes is their personal parking spot.  Currently, the City allows residents of a block who gather up enough signatures to “privatize” the parking on “their street” in front of their houses for FREE.  And FOR LIFE.  

The residential permit parking process doesn’t look at whether or not the houses on the street in question have garages or parking pads, just number of signatures.  The permit parking provides private privilege to permit holders at no cost, no additional property taxes paid for the exclusive use.

Yet the city is still obligated to maintain, repair, plow, sand and protect the “public” right of way.

Perhaps one way to even the playing field between residents and short stay visitors is to charge residents for street parking permits based on fair market rates. For example, if the fee for monthly parking at the nearby institution is $200/month, then charge $100/month for a residential street parking permit. 

If the street parking fee is $2.00/hour on the nearby commercial street then charge the residents $1.00/hr over the same period i.e. $10/day for a permit i.e. $250/month (or $3,000/yr.).  

The City is always looking for new sources of revenue. Here is an obvious one. If there are 39,000 residential parking permits in Calgary and if the City were to charge, on average, $1,000/year/household for each permit it would generate $39 million/year.  This could be used to spruce up neighbouring “main streets.”

Let’s see how many people apply for residential parking permits when they have to put some skin in the game.  

A typical inner city street in Calgary is lined with cars evenings and weekends even though every house has a garage or parking pad in the back alley.

A typical inner city street in Calgary is lined with cars evenings and weekends even though every house has a garage or parking pad in the back alley.

A typical inner city alley in Calgary two car garages or parking pads for every house. There is no need to park on the street unless you have two or more vehicles and if that is the case perhaps you should pay to park them on the street in high demand areas.

A typical inner city alley in Calgary two car garages or parking pads for every house. There is no need to park on the street unless you have two or more vehicles and if that is the case perhaps you should pay to park them on the street in high demand areas.

Infill Development Barrier 

Often the biggest complaint when a new infill development is proposed for an inner-city community is it will create parking issues, especially if it has commercial uses at the street. 

Too often inner-city residents say they want more amenities in their neighbourhood - cafés, bistros, urban grocery stores, medical offices etc. - but as soon as one is proposed, the complaints roll in about parking and traffic issues. They demand underground parking, which costs $40,000 to $70,000 a stall and then wonder why the cost of the condos and the restaurant or café prices are so high.    

In some cases, part of the traffic issue is people driving around looking for a parking spot even though there are dozens of empty street parking spots, but they are all reserved for those with FREE residential permits. 

Why shouldn’t the businesses have access to the street parking near them also? After all, they pay twice the taxes on a per square foot basis as residential property owners.  Don’t they and their customers also have a right to the street parking?

Ironically, if we want to make our inner-city communities more walkable we will have to share the street parking. Small businesses need the patronage of people driving from other communities to make them viable. 

This homeowner has installed his/her own parking signage. I am wondering if any senior can use it.

This homeowner has installed his/her own parking signage. I am wondering if any senior can use it.

LRT / Hospitals/ Schools

For those living near LRT stations, hospitals or large schools, the concern is people will park on the street all day when at work, rather than pay to park on site.  The easy solution: limit street parking in the area to a specific time period (could be two to four hours depending on what is appropriate).  Yes, some people will just come out and move their car, but that is the exception, not the rule.

Rather than building more parkades that take up valuable land and drive up housing costs, we need to put our existing street parking to better use.  An added benefit is people will be parking and walking further to their ultimate destination which will make them healthier. It will also put more eyes on the street, creating a safer neighbourhood. 

And yes, I know there are parking issues in places near special events, but “come on,” it is just a few times a year. Can’t we just suck it up and let people park on the street.  

Link: Petition to eliminate parking fees at hospitals

This corner lot near the Foothills hospital has room to park 6 cars even though the home owner has a large driveway and two car garage. Why not allow 2-hour parking for hospital visitors? Park and walk would be good for their health.

This corner lot near the Foothills hospital has room to park 6 cars even though the home owner has a large driveway and two car garage. Why not allow 2-hour parking for hospital visitors? Park and walk would be good for their health.

Parking Ombudsman 

Currently, there is no oversight to the parking permit process. It essentially happens automatically once a street gathers up enough signatures.  No council oversight, no planning oversight, and essentially little consultation with businesses or potential redevelopment opportunities.

Permit parking should be based on true need balanced against society or Municipal Development Plan goals, not the rule.  Generating commercial activity (to generate more taxes, employment, complete communities) should take a higher priority than private car storage for FREE. Most residential parking is only “needed” at night as most residents go to work during the day leaving lots of empty parking spots.  

Perhaps we need a parking ombudsman who can review existing and future requests to determine what is best for the city-at-large.  Some might say the Calgary Parking Authority acts as an ombudsman, but I would disagree.  

Their mandate is to generate revenue for the City. I have seen them convert 2-hour street parking that was working just fine into paid parking as a means of generating more revenue.  In some cases, their system has both paid and 2-hour free on the same street! How confusing is that?

What we don’t need is Council reviewing every residential parking permit request!  

Not a divine right…

If City Council really wants to foster innovative initiatives for the redevelopment of established neighbourhoods into more mixed-use complete communities, they should abolish residential street permits ASAP.  

Obviously, there will be some special cases like handicap parking but these should be very limited. 

Politicians will have to tell Calgarians “it is not your divine right to park your car on the street, in front of your house.”  

If you like this blog, you will like these links:


Calgary: City Planners Rethinking Community Plans

For decades, one of the key planning tools for community development in Calgary was the “Area Redevelopment Plan (ARP).” However, with the increasing number of communities (now over 200), the task to create new plans and update old ones has become formitable.  

So, the City of Calgary is experimenting with the idea of creating 40 or so “community districts,” each with their own strategic growth plans that incorporates the needs and aspirations of several neighbouring communities in a synergistic manner. 

That’s the hope anyway….

Does Calgary have too many communities?

Does Calgary have too many communities?

Is this a good idea? 

Jane Jacobs thinks so.  In her 1960s book “The Death and Life of Great American Cities” (which has become the bible for North American urban planning in the 21stcentury), she says “cities have too many communities - and that it leads to small town, inward thinking.” In her opinion, communities should be larger, about 50,000+ people, to allow for more diversity in perspectives and attitudes.  

At this scale, she feels a community will have sufficient votes to capture the politician’s attention and allow for more comprehensive planning rather than being fragmented into small neighbourhood plans.

Link: Video of Green Line LRT route

The Green Line is going to shape the redevelopment of Calgary for the next 50 years. It is going to be the catalyst for major changes in dozens of communities.

The Green Line is going to shape the redevelopment of Calgary for the next 50 years. It is going to be the catalyst for major changes in dozens of communities.

North Hill Communities 

Screen Shot 2018-10-13 at 12.51.55 PM.png

The City of Calgary’s first larger “community district” will be called North Hill.  

It will encompass  Highland Park, Mount Pleasant, Tuxedo Park, Winston Heights-Mountainview, Crescent Heights, Renfrew, Captiol Hill and Thorncliffe Greenview (south of Mcknight Blvd).  

These communities are all experiencing significant growing pains.

Infill housing developments of all shapes and sizes, as well as several major developments on the horizon - Highland Golf Course redevelopment, Green Line LRT and the 16thAvenue BRT will all dramatically reshape urban living in these communities.  

Edmonton Trail has huge potential to become a vibrant pedestrian street.

Edmonton Trail has huge potential to become a vibrant pedestrian street.

Did you know that 4th St NW is the site of Calgary’s first McDonald’s?

Did you know that 4th St NW is the site of Calgary’s first McDonald’s?

North Mount Pleasant Arts Centre is a hidden gem.

North Mount Pleasant Arts Centre is a hidden gem.

In the future Centre Street will (could) become a vibrant pedestrian street with an LRT station near this intersection.

In the future Centre Street will (could) become a vibrant pedestrian street with an LRT station near this intersection.

Centre Street as it passes through Highland Park with the Bow Tower in the background is ripe for redevelopment.

Centre Street as it passes through Highland Park with the Bow Tower in the background is ripe for redevelopment.

Is Bigger Better?

At this early stage the City will be hosting community meetings to gather ideas, issues and opportunities. It has a website https://engage.calgary.ca/NorthHill that allows everyone not just residents to ask questions and learn more about the plans for a North Hill Community Growth Plan.  

In the past the City, would have had to manage eight separate area redevelopment plans for communities ranging in size from 3,337 to 8,849 residents. The new “bigger is better” thinking model will develop one plan for 45,760 people.

Ironically this size fits with Jacobs’ belief.   

This is not the first time the City has developed growth plans that combined several neighbouring communities. Back in 2007, the City developed the Center City Plan which included Eau Claire, Chinatown, East Village, Downtown Core, Downtown West and the Beltline, recognizing that collectively, these urban mixed-use, high-rise communities shared a lot in common.  

Today, they have a combined population of 43,492, again near Jacob’s benchmark.  

Screen Shot 2018-12-01 at 5.43.19 PM.png

But wait there is more.   

Traditionally, Calgary’s communities have been established based on how developers and the City subdivided the land and built new homes. 

Screen Shot 2018-12-01 at 8.00.29 PM.png

However, the northwest community association of Northern Hills (not to be confused with North Hill) which includes Harvest Hills, Coventry Hills, Country Hills Estates, Panorama Hills Estates, Country Hills and Panorama Hills were all built in the ‘90s.  

All of these communities surround the regional VIVO (formerly Cardel Place) recreation and wellness centre which has become the heart, soul and gathering place for all six communities. 

It should be noted that the formation of the Northern Hills Community Association was led by the community, not by city planners or politicians.  

And it has a population of about 60,000 people. 

VIVO is a busy place….

VIVO is a busy place….

Last Word

The City of Calgary has moved to a more regional and integrated model for amenities like recreation and library facilities in the 1980s and developers have also moved to more regional shopping and entertainment centers since then. 

The concept of small independent communities (5,000 to 10,000 people) needs to evolve as urban living changes from being more local to more regionally based.   

VIVO and Calgary’s other mega recreation/leisure/library/wellness centres with their associated parks, playgrounds and playing fields have become the modern equivalent of the town squares of European cities built hundreds of years ago.  

City building is a continuous series of adaptations and the City of Calgary, developers and communities are obviously adapting to Calgary’s as it grows towards two million people and over 200 communities.  

Note: An edited version of this blog was published in the December issue of Condo Living magazine.

If you like this blog you will like these links:

Does Calgary have too many neighbourhoods?

Mount Pleasant: Calgary’s Other 4th Street

Calgary’s Highland Park Deserves Better

 

 




Calgary's Municipal Development Plan: A Herculean Task!

Calgary has to do something to stop urban sprawl.  We have to find a way to encourage more Calgarians to live in communities that already exist, rather then continue our rather relentless suburban march outward to Okotoks, Strathmore, Airdre and Cochrane.   

To meet the MDP’s target of 50% of Calgary’s population growth in developed areas, means the City and developers have to approve and build about 150 projects this size each year from now until 2069.

To meet the MDP’s target of 50% of Calgary’s population growth in developed areas, means the City and developers have to approve and build about 150 projects this size each year from now until 2069.

The City’s economists estimate that from 2009 to 2069, Calgary will add 1.3 million people. That's a doubling. So where will we put everyone?

Calgary’s Municipal Development Plan (MDP) has set a very ambitious target that 50% of all population growth from 2009 until 2069 will be in older established communities called the Developed Area. 

It is the blueprint for Calgary’s future.

Yikes, that means adding 650,000 to our existing neighbourhoods - if we achieve the 1.3 million population increase.

A noble goal.

Screen Shot 2018-10-10 at 12.48.34 PM.png

Herculean Task

But in reality, it'll be very difficult, if not impossible to convince Calgarians to move into inner-city communities for various reasons.

To accommodate 650,000 new people via infill, new build, rebuild and other projects in our established communities, we'd need to add about 10,000 people to those communities per year. That is like adding one East Village every year, for the next 50 years somewhere in our City Centre or the older suburbs.  

When you understand how the differential death/birth rates, demographics, household sizes, land assembly and approval times, all significantly favour population growth in suburbs you being to appreciate the City has set itself a Herculean task!

We all have skin in this game. The MDP is our roadmap for shaping the kind of city we want to live in. It affects roads and transit planning and residential property taxes.

It impacts our collective carbon and economic footprint.

It's a plan we need to understand in detail as it will mean many of us will have to change the way we live!

Screen Shot 2018-09-04 at 10.18.38 AM.png
To meet the MDP targets will mean more high-rises at strategic sites in many inner-city communities.

To meet the MDP targets will mean more high-rises at strategic sites in many inner-city communities.

Screen Shot 2018-10-10 at 12.44.43 PM.png
Note since 2012 the cumulative growth in developed areas has grown to 25% which is encouraging.

Note since 2012 the cumulative growth in developed areas has grown to 25% which is encouraging.

EASIER SAID THAN DONE

Calgary's MDP was adopted back in 2009.  

That was a time of a different reality for our city - pre downturn - but still, it's the vision we are using as we move forward.  

The City’s mid-term target is for 33% of all of Calgary’s population growth between 2009 and 2039, to be in established communities and 50% by 2069. 

To give you an idea of the radical change this would be, from 2006-2016, about 91% of Calgary's growth was in suburbs, and only 9% or so was in developed communities. 

Link: MDP Monitoring Report

To go from 9% population growth in the Developed Areas to 50% is going to mean a paradigm shift in how the City, developers and Calgarians live. The City would need to devote considerably more time and tax dollars to making the inner-city communities a more attractive and affordable place to “live, work and play” than it has ever done before.  

This will mean new mid-rise condos along major transit routes and the conversion of old shopping centre, church and school sites into mixed-use, multi-building developments in every inner-city community. 

Think Stadium Shopping Centre, Kensington Legion or Westbrook Village on the old Ernest Manning High School site happening in almost every inner-city community.

This will mean huge investments in things like inner-city Bus Rapid Transit, bike lanes, public spaces, park and recreational facility upgrades. It will also mean finding land, conducting complex public engagement and approvals and completing infrastructure upgrades to build 250,000+ new homes – singles, duplexes, row housing and low, mid and high-rise buildings in every established community.

How this will happen and can this mega makeover happen is complicated. There are a bunch of numbers and indicators that really question if the city has created a target that is impossible to achieve. 

T he MDP encourages increased density along major transit routes throughout the inner-city.

The MDP encourages increased density along major transit routes throughout the inner-city.

Demographics matter

Back to that 9% number and how our growth has always been and still is mostly in suburbs. Right now, despite thousands of new infill homes, multifamily builds, and hundreds of new condo buildings, developed neighbourhoods account for a very small bit of Calgary's growth.

How's this possible?  Get ready for some math.

It probably shouldn’t surprise anyone, but the older suburbs are where the older Calgarians live. A quick check of the City of Calgary’s community profiles showed that in Lake Bonavista 22% of the population is over 65, Acadia 17%, Silver Springs 17% and Lakeview 20%. Whereas new communities like Aspen Woods, Bridlewood, Evanston and Auburn Bay have 5% of less of their population over 65. 

So, you'll find more grey hair, like mine, in the middle ring suburbs (communities built between 1950 - 2000).  

On average the City of Calgary forecasts about 7,500 deaths each year, unfortunately the City doesn’t track deaths by community. However, it is fair to say that significantly more deaths occur in the developed areas than the developing one. 

Similarly, there is a significant difference in the birth rates in Calgary’s established communities vs new ones. Again the City doesn’t track how Calgary’s annual 17,000 births are distributed throughout the city. But a review of the City’s community profiles shows there are significantly more young children in the new communities at the edge of the city than there are in older communities.  

In addition, established communities are more likely to have older teens and young adults who will be moving out of the house, which will further decreased their population over the next 25+ years.  

Simply put, the older suburbs don’t stand chance against the new suburbs when it comes to their population growth vs new suburbs given their low birth and high death rates.


Screen Shot 2018-10-11 at 11.59.32 AM.png

This is not a fair fight!

The City admits this is an issue.  

Their Municipal Development Plan / Calgary Transportation Plan 2018 Monitoring Progress Report states, “to meet the 33 per cent growth share of the Developed Area for the 2006-2039 period, approximately 47 percent of the growth will need to be captured annually in the Developed Areas over the next 20 years. 

Screen Shot 2018-10-11 at 11.55.09 AM.png

LAND, LAND AND MORE LAND. 

Then there's this.... most land in established communities is, by definition, developed – already built on.  So, how does the City expect developers to go about amassing sufficient land in these areas to build the 250,000 or so new homes that will be needed to accommodate the 650,000 more people the city expects to live there by 2069. 

The City and developers are going to face a hard time approving inner-city projects in established communities given the increasing complications of community engagement and infrastructure upgrades needed. 

But let's say we do build up, that also presents financial problems. 

To meet the MDP targets the City is going to have to work with developers to foster major residential development next to all inner-city LRT stations.   And the market demand will have to be there to ensure the developments are successful.

To meet the MDP targets the City is going to have to work with developers to foster major residential development next to all inner-city LRT stations. And the market demand will have to be there to ensure the developments are successful.

WHEN FREE ISN'T FREE

People often assume infill projects are free for the city, as they don’t need any new roads, transit, schools, police and fire stations etc. This is not true.   

More people create more pressure on old infrastructure. Which comes with a cost.

For example, the city is spending $44 million to replace aging on infrastructure upgrades along the 17th Avenue SW to make it more attractive for future business and residential development. In Forest Lawn, to accommodate future development the City is investing $96 million in BRT to connect the communities along International Avenue (17th Ave SE) to the City Centre, as well as create a more pedestrian friendly experience. 

And then is East Village, where the City has invested mega millions in new infrastructure, a well as new library, museum, public art, community garden, dog park and redevelopment of St. Patrick’s Island Park.  

If we are going to accommodate up to 650,000 more people living in inner-city communities they are going to want more amenities equivalent the new suburbs – iconic recreation centres. Smacking down 10 thousand new people next to an older smaller library, or with a less developed park or community centre, is going to increase demands for better 'stuff'. 

But even if there is a commitment to redeveloping older neighbourhoods, and we come up with the money, it is the 'cost' of the actual 'house' itself, which will make the target of up to 650,000 more people in established communities difficult.

AFFORDABILITY

Most Calgarians today simply can’t afford the cost of homes in established communities.  

Think of it this way. In the 'burbs' a modern single family home can, lock stock and barrel, easily cost $500,000. In developed communities, especially the inner city a lot, just the lot, can cost $500,000. 

Yes, we could try to focus on condos replacing single family homes in redeveloping older neighbourhoods, but the cost of a condo can be twice as much in the City Center vs. one in the suburbs, especially if you are looking at a concrete building with underground parking.  

And it is going to take a huge shift in thinking to get Calgary families to adopt condo living as their preferred way of living.

Until the City and developers can find a way to build more affordable high-density infill housing, Calgarians will continue to gravitate to living in the city’s new suburbs or even in edge cities like Airdrie and Cochrane.

Screen Shot 2018-09-29 at 10.16.04 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-09-29 at 10.16.13 PM.png

Progress Is Being Made 

More and more niche infill developers are building small row housing projects or small condo complexes to replace two or three small mid-century homes in inner-city communities as a means of providing more affordable housing in established neighbourhoods.   

We are heading in the right direction. 

Many of our inner-city communities are bustling with new infill projects and the City Centre is full of cranes building new highrise residential towers.  In fact, the 2018 census showed a significant increase the population of the City Centre and the inner-city communities around it. 

However, there was a decline in the older suburbs between the inner-city ring and the new suburbs that offset most of the growth near the city centre. 

The evolution of the mid to late 20thcentury communities from almost exclusively single-family residential neighbourhoods to a mix of housing types will take more than two generations i.e. 60 years.  

Communities like West Hillhurst, Bridgeland and Altadore have been experiencing infill development for over 30 years and only recently have their populations begun to grow beyond what they were in the 60s.   

We have a long, long way to go, and a lot to think about, and a plan that needs to be more realistic to early be helpful. 

This map illustrates population change in Calgary’s 200+ neighbourhoods. The greener the better - pun intended. The grey and yellow neighbourhoods are the ones that are going to be difficult to redevelop - but not impossible.

This map illustrates population change in Calgary’s 200+ neighbourhoods. The greener the better - pun intended. The grey and yellow neighbourhoods are the ones that are going to be difficult to redevelop - but not impossible.

Linking Vision With Reality

Rhetoric or aspirational thinking that is not based in reality is a dangerous thing. While it can inspire, inform, encourage and energize people, it can also have the opposite effect. Rhetoric (which there is no shortage in our culture), that falls flat time and again, will jade the community and ultimate lose its power to motivate change.  

We must be careful of not setting impossible targets in the name of 'doing something' about sprawl, environmentalism, and economic development. 

The intent of the MDP is good, there are lots of good ideas and policies but the targets need to be achievable.  

We need to rethink the target of 33% of all Calgary’s population growth between 2009 and 2039, to be in established communities and 50% by 2069.   

A better target would be to achieve continuous improvement from the 90/10 new vs. old community split with perhaps getting to a 50/50 split by the year 2069.  

Or perhaps to establish different goals for the City Centre and older inner-city communities vs. the mid to late 20th century and early 21st century communities recognizing each have their own inherent opportunities for and barriers to diversification and densification.  


Calgary is not alone in struggling to get more people to live in the inner-city vs. outer suburbs.

Calgary is not alone in struggling to get more people to live in the inner-city vs. outer suburbs.

Last Word

Good plans are not static, they adapting to new information, opportunities and realities as they become apparent. In a discussion with the City staff, I learned the City is indeed planning a review and updating of both the Municipal Development Plan and Calgary Transportation Plan early in 2019.  

And YES there will be an opportunity for community engagement. So, put on your thinking caps and let the City know how we can realistically better manage our City’s growth to slow down urban sprawl. 

Let’s work together to make our city better….

Note: An edited version of this blog was published by CBC Calgary as part of its Road Ahead feature. Link: Can Calgary really cram 650,000 more people into existing communities?

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Is Calgary ready for real urban living?

80% of Calgarians must live in the ‘burbs

Urban living is in its infancy in Calgary


Downtown West: A Quiet Evolution

While Calgary’s Downtown’s East Village has been getting lots of attention for its amazing transformation, Downtown West is quietly being transformed into an urban village also.   

Downtown West is the gateway to Calgary’s City Centre by car, bike, transit or walking.

Downtown West is the gateway to Calgary’s City Centre by car, bike, transit or walking.

It is home to Shaw Millennium Park, that includes one of the best skate parks in the world.

It is home to Shaw Millennium Park, that includes one of the best skate parks in the world.

While Downtown West doesn’t have a fancy river pathway like Eau Claire or East Village, it does have a very functional pathway along the Bow River that includes the Nat Christie Park. The Downtown West pathway is popular place for Calgarians of all ages to stroll year-round .

While Downtown West doesn’t have a fancy river pathway like Eau Claire or East Village, it does have a very functional pathway along the Bow River that includes the Nat Christie Park. The Downtown West pathway is popular place for Calgarians of all ages to stroll year-round.

Bet you have never heard of the The Nat Christie Park or that it is home to The Stone Sculptor Guild of North America’s small art park with several intimate stone sculptures.

Bet you have never heard of the The Nat Christie Park or that it is home to The Stone Sculptor Guild of North America’s small art park with several intimate stone sculptures.

Downtown West’s quiet evolution is about to get a bit louder with the West Village project that is going to be another architectural landmark for Calgary.

Downtown West’s quiet evolution is about to get a bit louder with the West Village project that is going to be another architectural landmark for Calgary.

Hidden Gem

Indeed, East Village has lots of headline grabbing projects in East Village – the spectacular new library and museum, the mixed-use St. Patrick’s Island Park, bridge, riverwalk, the fun community garden and playground, as well as the shiny new condo towers. 

At the other end of downtown, Downtown West, has quietly been evolving since the mid ‘90s with new condos, parks and public art making it an ever more attractive place to “live and play.”  So much so, that over the next 10 years, it could become a hidden gem. But first it needs to sort out its name as some City documents refer to it as Downtown West, while others call it Downtown West End. The Community Association calls itself Downtown West so that is what I’m going with.   

Personally, I would love it if they renamed it Mewata, a Cree word for “pleasant place” or “to be happy.”  Seems appropriate to me.

Link: Downtown West Community Association

The University of Calgary’s Downtown Campus Building’s snake-like facade proceeded that of of East Village’s National Music Centre.

The University of Calgary’s Downtown Campus Building’s snake-like facade proceeded that of of East Village’s National Music Centre.

Downtown West was home to Calgary’s Planetarium and Science Centre, which is ear marked to become a public art gallery. It is the gateway into the downtown for LRT riders.

Downtown West was home to Calgary’s Planetarium and Science Centre, which is ear marked to become a public art gallery. It is the gateway into the downtown for LRT riders.

In 1911, Downtown West became the home of Mount Royal College on the parking lot on the north side of the LRT Station. In 1949, the college expanded adding the modern red brick Kerby Memorial Building that still stands today on the south side of the Station. The College moved to Lincoln park in 1972, the original building was demolished and the Kerby Memorial Building become the Kerby Centre for Seniors.  Backstory: Rev. George Kerby established the Methodist College in 1910, in what is now the Central United Church. It became the Mount Royal College when it wanted provincial accreditation. Rumour has it Premier Rutherford said it needed a new name so Kerby looked out the window and saw the new Mount Royal neighbourhood and suggest that should be the name. (credit: Historic Walks of Caglary, Harry M. Sanders)

In 1911, Downtown West became the home of Mount Royal College on the parking lot on the north side of the LRT Station. In 1949, the college expanded adding the modern red brick Kerby Memorial Building that still stands today on the south side of the Station. The College moved to Lincoln park in 1972, the original building was demolished and the Kerby Memorial Building become the Kerby Centre for Seniors.

Backstory: Rev. George Kerby established the Methodist College in 1910, in what is now the Central United Church. It became the Mount Royal College when it wanted provincial accreditation. Rumour has it Premier Rutherford said it needed a new name so Kerby looked out the window and saw the new Mount Royal neighbourhood and suggest that should be the name. (credit: Historic Walks of Caglary, Harry M. Sanders)

Downtown West 101

Screen Shot 2018-11-17 at 11.27.40 AM.png

Downtown West is the neighbourhood between 8th and 14th Streets SW and between the CPR tracks and the Bow River.  

It is home to University of Calgary’s Downtown Campus building, the historic Mewata Armoury, Shaw Millennium Park and the Kerby Centre. 

 Its two LRT Stations, (at 8th and 11th Street SW) give its residents connections to both LRT legs.  

Back in the late ‘90s, (i.e. long before East Village’s renaissance), new residential towers were popping up everywhere in Downtown West – including Axxis, Discovery Pointe, The Barclay and The Macleod at Riverwest, Five West and Tarjan Pointe. These were the first new residential developments in Calgary’s City Centre since the late ‘70s. 

One of the key developers to kickstart the ‘90s Downtown West condo craze was Vancouver’s Nat Bosa, father of Ryan Bosa, President of BOSA Development who today ironically is the leading condo developer in East Village (he is also building Royal condo in the Beltline).  The BOSA Development website’s section on Calgary proudly states, “In the mid-’90s we offered an alternative, delivering a series of five high-quality condominium developments in the downtown West End.”

Today, Downtown West it home to 2,757 Calgarians.  The community’s largest cohort is 25 to 34 year olds i.e. young professionals, who love the fact they can walk to work, run along the river and/or play at Shaw Millennium Park.  

Fast forward a decade or so later. Early in the 21stcentury, Downtown West development began to stagnate as other City Centre communities became more attractive– Beltline, East Village, Mission and Bridgeland.  In fact, there was no increase in the community’s population from 2009 to 2014, and an increased of only 470 since then.   

Unfortunately, Downtown West without a master plan to guide its development and a walkable main street to provide those important the everyday walkable amenities (e.g. grocery store, cafes, restaurants, medical services) is at a huge disadvantage compared to Calgary’s other City Centre communities. 

Several new condos were constructed in Downtown West in the ‘90s, creating a very urban streetscape.

Several new condos were constructed in Downtown West in the ‘90s, creating a very urban streetscape.

Unfortunately over the past 10 years many of the empty lots in Downtown West have not been maintained, however this is about to change.

Unfortunately over the past 10 years many of the empty lots in Downtown West have not been maintained, however this is about to change.

Mewata Armoury was completed in 1918 and is still used by several Arm Forces groups. It would make a great weekend farmers’ market.

Mewata Armoury was completed in 1918 and is still used by several Arm Forces groups. It would make a great weekend farmers’ market.

New Developments  

Until recently, that is. First, Grosvenor/Cressy completed phase one of their two tower upscale Avenue West project adding 195 new condos.  Then, La Caille completed Vogue, their art deco -inspired 36-storey project, adding 232 new condos. Cidex isactively building phase 1 of their Dubai-inspired West Village Towers (the project was co-designed by NORR’s Dubai and Calgary architectural teams), a three towers project that will see 575 new homes and 90,000 square feet of retail added to the community. 

In fact, West Village Towers could be a game changer for Downtown West if the retail space includes a urban grocery store and other key amenities to make urban living in the community more attractive. I do wonder thought about the confusing name “West Village” as this project not in West Village a proposed new community west of 14th Street SW several blocks away.  

In addition, a major $10 million redevelopment of Century Gardens is currently underway at the southeast edge of the community will provide a passive urban space that will complement Shaw Millennium Park. 

Link: Revitalizing Calgary’s Downtown West

Avenue West is Downtown West’s first luxury condo in many decades.

Avenue West is Downtown West’s first luxury condo in many decades.

West Village is destined to become one of Calgary’s architectural gems.

West Village is destined to become one of Calgary’s architectural gems.

The new Century Gardens will be more open and better linked to the streets. It will included a space for a cafe and will have a splash pond for families.

The new Century Gardens will be more open and better linked to the streets. It will included a space for a cafe and will have a splash pond for families.

East Village vs Downtown West 

The iconic Jack Long-designed Planetarium/Science Centre built in 1967 is about to become a new public art gallery. While not on the scale of East Village’s new Central Library or the National Music Centre, it will put Downtown West on Calgary’s art and cultural map.  While East Village has Calgary’s two new iconic buildings (Library and National Music Centre), West Village has Calgary’s best historic iconic building – Mewata Armouries.  It is like having a castle in your backyard! 

Shaw Millennium Park is home to numerous summer festivals, and the equivalent of East Village’s St. Patrick’s Island Park. 

While Downtown West doesn’t have a high profile public art program like East Village’s, the lovely Nat Christie Sculpture Park along the Bow River just east of the 14thStreet bridge and several other pieces scattered in the community definitely make it more attractive. 

Downtown West is not only well connected to the downtown, but it is within easy walking distance to Kensington with its shops and major grocery store, as well as to the Beltline and its tow two grocery stores. While East Village will be getting a grocery store eventually, it can’t match Downtown West’s array of grocery stores, including Kay’s, an independent grocery store and the “coming soon” Urban Fare in the Beltline. 

Like East Village’s N3 condo, which has no parking, Cidex Group has plans for “The Hat on 7th” building at the 11th Street LRT station with no parking. 

Millennium Park is a popular spot for photographers and painters.

Millennium Park is a popular spot for photographers and painters.

Screen Shot 2018-11-16 at 4.31.07 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-11-16 at 4.30.41 PM.png

Community involvement on the rise

The Downtown West Community Association was successful this past summer in lobbying the City to create three murals, a temporary park on land that is currently unused and the sprucing up of the small plaza next to the Avatamsaka Monastery as a means of making the community more attractive.  Proof positive that Downtown West’s residents are taking pride and ownership of their community’s future.  

Even without a master plan, a champion and the investment of mega tax dollars in infrastructure, public spaces and buildings, Downtown West has seen significant improvements over the past 25 years as a place to live and play.  Imagine what might happen as the community becomes even more involved in shaping its future. 

Downtown West has one of the most thought provoking new murals in the city on the side of the Attainable Homes building. Attainable homes is an organization that helps low income families buy homes and the child in the mural lives in one of their projects. How appropriate? The piece is titled “Chalk Drawing” and is by Jason Botkin.

Downtown West has one of the most thought provoking new murals in the city on the side of the Attainable Homes building. Attainable homes is an organization that helps low income families buy homes and the child in the mural lives in one of their projects. How appropriate? The piece is titled “Chalk Drawing” and is by Jason Botkin.

Bet you have never heard of Downtown West’s Poet Plaza! Yep this is it. It is small so you could easily miss it.

Bet you have never heard of Downtown West’s Poet Plaza! Yep this is it. It is small so you could easily miss it.

Poet Plaza is home to Ascension a public art work by INCIPIO MODO an artist collective founded by two sculptors, Danira Miralda and Edward Beltran from Mexico City.

Poet Plaza is home to Ascension a public art work by INCIPIO MODO an artist collective founded by two sculptors, Danira Miralda and Edward Beltran from Mexico City.

Game Changers 

A real game changer for Downtown West would be if the City and community work together on the redevelopment of the huge Louise Crossing site - currently an ugly surface parking lot on the southeast side of the Louise Bridge.  Technically the site is in Eau Claire but really should be part of Downtown West. At one time this site was considered for the new Central Library, while I believe some thought it might be a good home for an Opera House.  It could be (and should be) something special. 

The time has come to set up a steering committee to look at the biggest and best use of the site to create an attractive link between Downtown West End, Eau Claire and Kensington, as well as create another multi-user urban playground along the Bow River.   

It is also an opportunity to create a vibrant mixed-use TOD (transit-oriented development) around the 11th Street SW LRT station, given the Kerby Centre’s plans to relocate and its adjacent surface parking lot begging to be developed. 

The Louise Crossing site is waiting for an innovative and imaginative project that will make it the waterfront playground for not only Downtown West but the entire west side of the inner city. It would link Downtown West, Eau Claire and Kensington.

The Louise Crossing site is waiting for an innovative and imaginative project that will make it the waterfront playground for not only Downtown West but the entire west side of the inner city. It would link Downtown West, Eau Claire and Kensington.

The Downtown West LRT Station is also a prime site for development with a mix of retail, restaurants and residential.

The Downtown West LRT Station is also a prime site for development with a mix of retail, restaurants and residential.

The 8th St LRT Station is on the eastern edge of Downtown West.

The 8th St LRT Station is on the eastern edge of Downtown West.

Westmount Towers was completed in 1979 and sat alone for 15 years, until new condos were built in the mid 1990s. It is another example of a strange Downtown West building name as Westmount is the historic name for the community across the Bow River from Downtown West where the old CBC building was located.

Westmount Towers was completed in 1979 and sat alone for 15 years, until new condos were built in the mid 1990s. It is another example of a strange Downtown West building name as Westmount is the historic name for the community across the Bow River from Downtown West where the old CBC building was located.

Last Word

While East Village is shouting out “look at me,” Downtown West is quietly positioning itself to become the City Centre’s next vibrant urban village.  

Note: An edited version of this blog was published in the Calgary Herald’s New Condos section on Nov 17, 2018.

If you like this blog, you will like:

Calgary: Downtown Living Is Cooler Than You Think

Urban living is in its infancy in Calgary!

Is Calgary ready for real urban living?

 

Confessions Of A Public Art Artist

Recently I was walking my sister’s dog Max in Calgary’s Signal Hill community when I came upon a piece of public art next to a children’s playground. I had often seen the piece in the distance when driving to my sister’s house, but thought it was part of the playground.  

To me, from this angle all of the shapes look like houses a young child might draw. It looks very inviting for a child to run around and through it. It is also interesting to see how the shape of the artwork’s element echo those of the houses in the background.

To me, from this angle all of the shapes look like houses a young child might draw. It looks very inviting for a child to run around and through it. It is also interesting to see how the shape of the artwork’s element echo those of the houses in the background.

Village Fun

To my surprise the artwork was by Cecila Gossen who I have know since ‘80s when I was at the Muttart Art Gallery and she was doing her PhD in art at the University of Calgary.  

I immediately loved the titled “Village,” along with its bright colours and ambiguous shapes that looked both like houses and figures.  While it is a sculpture, it also make references to the line drawings young children make with their crayons.  

I thought “what a fitting addition to a playground.”

I have long thought playgrounds should be designed by artists so they can serve a dual purpose of being both a playground and a small art park. I couldn’t stop thinking about the piece when I got home so I contacted Cecila to find out more about the work and how it got there.  

She was quick to respond and most willing to share her experience

Backstory

Turns out the piece was originally proposed for the 4th Street SW in Mission as part of their Business Improvement Area’s sculpture program that started in the ‘90s as a means of enhancing the streetscape for pedestrians.  

FYI: There are several pieces along 4th Street SW from 13th to 26th St. SW.   

Cecila decided to submit to the 4th St. Sculpture Program back in 2005, so she built a little maquette and submitted it to the art jury, however her piece wasn’t chosen. Several months later, she received a call from Robin Robertson an art consultant who was one of the 4th Street jurors asking Cecila if she would be interested in a commission from the Signal Hill Community Association for a sculpture in one of their parks. 

The Association had a large piece land that had been set aside for a park and a possible future school and they wanted a sculpture on the site.  Cecila was thrilled and immediately said “Yes!”  

IMG_6511.jpg

Inspiration 

Cecila’s inspiration for “Village” was the saying ‘it takes a village to raise a child’. Remember the piece was proposed for a sidewalk along 4th St SW.  Her idea was people could walk through the different house shapes and perhaps it would become a meeting place on the street where people would gather and chat about the sculpture or life in general.

She loved the idea of creating a little village in the middle of Mission a historic community that was becoming an urban village. The bright primary colours were meant to remind us of our childhood, as was the size of the structures. 

Of course, being in a park next to a playground where there might one day be a school worked too. 

How $25,000 becomes $200

Shortly thereafter, she was told the budget was $25,000, so she calculated what she thought her costs to fabricate and install the piece might be and decided she had plenty of money to do a good job.

She had never done an outdoor piece before, but had done some large 8 ft by 8 ft indoor pieces and was aware of the safety considerations and the material needs and costs associated with larger works.

Then she received a copy of letter from City Parks to Robin, listing their conditions for the permit to install the sculpture in a public park. 

She needed: 

  • architect to produce ‘reproducible mylar drawings' of the sculpture 

  • engineer had to design the concrete base to support the sculpture

  • engineer’s stamp 

  • structural consultant’s approval 

  • contact utilities to mark the spot was safe for construction

  • re-plant the landscape as needed to original state

  • repair any damages to existing irrigation if needed

Out of the $25,000 she ended up having to pay for:

  • The excavation of the site

  • Pouring of an 8 ft by 8 ft by 8 inch concrete base for the sculpture

  • Fabrication of the steel pieces of the sculpture

  • Powder coasting

  • Sod, gravel, twelve wood railway ties for the perimeter

  • 7 guys from a local rugby team (more later)

She notes, “originally the base was to be a circle, but she couldn’t afford the pavers to form the circle, so I had to go with a rectangle, something that could be done with railway ties. She says “next time I would find somebody to help me with all the City regulations.”

When all was said and done she cleared about $200.

But that doesn’t include gas and mileage (every time anyone showed up at the site, I had to be present), postage, steaks and beer for the rugby team (more later). Fortunately, Signal Hill Community Association was able to get the engineer and architect services donated, and there was no damage to the irrigation system. 

From this angle it looks like two adults, a child and a house.

From this angle it looks like two adults, a child and a house.

From this angle it looks more like parade or a group of figures walking together on a sidewalk .

From this angle it looks more like parade or a group of figures walking together on a sidewalk.

Confession

Yes, Cecila would do it again. She did not do it for the money, but she was terribly worried it would end up costing her money.  She is very proud of the piece. 

She found, “Parks was a bear to deal with. I think they did not want the sculpture there. As a matter of fact, the original site for the sculpture was at the corner of Sirocco Drive and Signal Hills Heights. I would have loved the original site because the sculpture would have been visible from different approaches by more people.”

In the end, there was a party for the unveiling, lots of people came and everybody loved it.  Today kids use it as bit of a climbing structures, run around and through as they like to do and some use it as a bike rack. It still looks as fresh today as when it was installed in 2007. 

Over the years, many people who know Cecila and see the sculpture will call her or send her a text like I did, telling her how much they like the piece.  

I guess that is the only dividend for artists who create public art, it sure ain’t the money.   

Screen Shot 2018-11-12 at 11.34.27 AM.png
IMG_6512.jpg
IMG_6513.jpg
IMG_1159.JPG
IMG_1156.JPG

Rugby Team Connection  

Cecila and her husband attended a fund-raiser for her son Andy’s rugby team while the installation details were being worked out. One of the silent auction items was something like “Five Guys, One Afternoon: Clean out your basement, Do yard work!” whatever.  She bid on it and got it. 

She then told the guys her plan was to get them to help with the sculpture installation and promised them a beer and a steak dinner at her house when they finished. Seven players showed up and did a magnificent job of spreading pea gravel under the sculpture, putting the railway ties in place and sodded the entire area that had been disturbed. It was a very fun afternoon and a fun way to finish the project.

There goes the $200.  

Last Word

Cecila notes, “when we hear how much some public art pieces cost, I wonder what percentage goes back to city offices for the various permits and how much of the budget is spent in things other than the sculpture itself.” 

She still “laughs at the size and bulk of the concrete pad that was required. Someday, hundreds of years from now, some archaeologist will dig this huge concrete cube and try to figure out its purpose.”

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Confessions of public art juror.

Do we really need all of this public art?

“Rodger That” says 12-year old Matt re public art

 

 

New Condos Help Kensington Thrive!

With the addition of several new condos – Kensington by Bucci, Ezra by Birchwood and Lido by Battistella – Kensington Village now has 10,000 people living within walking distance, a number considered by many urban strategists to be the threshold needed for street retail, restaurants and cafes to thrive. 

Kennsington has a lively pedestrian animation year-round (especially when the sky is blue).

Kennsington has a lively pedestrian animation year-round (especially when the sky is blue).

Annie says…

Annie MacInnis has been the Executive Director of the Kensington Business Improvement Association (BIA) for the past 15 years. She recognizes the important role the new condos and their 1,000+ new residents have played not only in increasing the number of shoppers and diners, but also the new energy these newcomers have brought to the community.  She is looking forward to next wave of condos - Annex by Minto and Memorial Drive by Anthem Properties – that will add to the growing vibrancy. 

MacInnis has a long personal history with Kensington, living in the community when the LRT was first proposed in the early ‘80s and opposed by many in the neighbourhood.  

She laughs when she thinks about how today, the community’s LRT connection to the downtown and the University of Calgary is one of the community’s key attractions. 

One of the biggest changes she has noticed over the past 15 years is how the BIA and the Community Association are now working together to build a vibrant community. It wasn’t always the case.  

Fifteen years ago, the business district was in a decline, the public realm needed replacement, and the BIA and the community association were not working easily together.

 Another watershed moment happened in the ‘90s when the two anchors at each end of the village were established - Safeway renovating its store on the north end of 10thStreet NW and Shoppers Drug Mart opening its store at the west end of Kensington Road – together, meeting most residents’ everyday needs.  

Since the opening of Calgary’s first Starbucks in the mid ‘90s next to the independent café Higher Ground, not only have both survived, but together they’ve enhanced Kensington’s reputation as Calgary’s premier coffee house destination.

While The Plaza theatre has had its ups and downs, it is a key differentiator for the village and critical to it ongoing vibrancy. 

Ezra on Riley Park is now completed and is expanding Kensington’s urban living west towards 14th St. SW  .

Ezra on Riley Park is now completed and is expanding Kensington’s urban living west towards 14th St. SW.

Lido (foreground) and Pixel (behind) by Battistella Developments have transformed 10th Avenue into a more vibrant pedestrian street.

Lido (foreground) and Pixel (behind) by Battistella Developments have transformed 10th Avenue into a more vibrant pedestrian street.

Battistella has plans to create a new condo project on this site, while retaining some of the elements of the church.

Battistella has plans to create a new condo project on this site, while retaining some of the elements of the church.

Reinvesting Parking Revenues

In 2015/16, MacInnis worked with the City of Calgary to manage the six million dollar makeover of Kensington’s public realm – new sidewalks, street lighting, furniture and replacement of all the unhealthy trees. The results have exceeded her expectations and will enhance the street for existing and new businesses for decades.  

In fact, the Kensington BIA won two international awards in 2014 for the innovative funding of the public realm improvements – “Best in the West” Excellence Award for Downtown Leadership and Management at the BIABC/International Downtown Association Western Canada and Pacific Northwest US Conference, as well as a Merit Award for Downtown Leadership and Management at the International Downtown Association conference. What particularly made the project unique was the securing of $4.5 million from the City of Calgary’s surplus parking revenues which opened the door for negotiations between Calgary’s Business Improvement Districts (BIA) and the City for an ongoing parking revenue sharing program for public realm improvements.  

In 2016, the City of Calgary, in partnership with Calgary Parking Authority and the BIAs developed an annual Parking Surplus Reinvestment Program, making monies available to any BIA or community with paid street parking for public realm improvements.   

Summer patios are another way Kensington enhances the pedestrian experience.

Summer patios are another way Kensington enhances the pedestrian experience.

Pages Books’ enhances the sidewalk experience with its outdoor book displays.

Pages Books’ enhances the sidewalk experience with its outdoor book displays.

Kensington still has its small town charm even with all of the new condos.

Kensington still has its small town charm even with all of the new condos.

The More Art The Better

With the streetscape now upgraded, MacInnis is focusing her efforts on enhancing Kensington’s alleys and side yards. “More murals and more art” is her mantra today.  Building on the existing street art in the back alley along the east side of 10thStreet NW, she has several projects on the go.  Three alleys between buildings have been activated with murals and lighting - east side of Pulcinella, east side of Norfolk Housing Association, and east side of 10thSt by Charisma.  

She is also working on installing a 17-foot tall kinetic, wind sculpture that is also have an interactive seat for two at its base, as well as a bicycle that allows you to you to charge your phone as you pedal. 

MacInnis’ vision for Kensington is for it to be an “irresistible destination where people want to come because there is cool art and whimsical activations to charm and delight, as well as lots of interesting shops and places to eat and drink in between exploring all its nooks and crannies.”

The summer Container Bar is great use of a side alley.

The summer Container Bar is great use of a side alley.

The Oak Tree was way ahead of its time when it commissioned this mural many years ago.

The Oak Tree was way ahead of its time when it commissioned this mural many years ago.

The back alleys in Kensington have become outdoor art galleries for street artists.

The back alleys in Kensington have become outdoor art galleries for street artists.

Last Word

MacInnis is very optimistic about the future of Kensington. With several more condos in the works, the future of Kensington continues to look bright, as a fun place to live, eat, drink, play and shop in Calgary.  

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Kensington: One of North America’s Healthiest Communities

A Sunday Walkabout In Kensington

Kensington Legion: The Taller The Better?

Chinatown Makeover: You can’t please everyone!

Does Chinatown get swallowed up as the downtown highrises (office and residential) creep northwards toward the Bow River.

Or, does it become a pedestrian oasis that celebrates Calgary’s 135-year old Chinese culture?

Screen Shot 2018-11-05 at 3.32.47 PM.png

Let the debate begin

Rendering of the the two residential and one hotel tower that is proposed for the Chinatown parking lot above.

Rendering of the the two residential and one hotel tower that is proposed for the Chinatown parking lot above.

Parking vs Towers

That is the question Calgary’s City Council will debate on Nov 12th, 2018 when they are asked to approve a Land Use change and Development Permit for a huge mixed-use development that includes two-28 storey residential towers, a 12-story hotel and street retail.   

There are at least two sides to the El Condor Land debate – “El Condor” referring to the company that owns the land in question. The site encompasses almost the entire block from 2nd Street to 1st Street SW and from 2nd Ave to 3rd Ave SW.  

Rendering of the proposed pedestrian mews with shops, cafes and restaurants at street level with hotel and residential above.

Rendering of the proposed pedestrian mews with shops, cafes and restaurants at street level with hotel and residential above.

A bit of context…

Calgary’s Chinatown has been stagnant, some might argue even in decline - for the past decade or more. The 2013 Calgary Flood hit the business community hard. The cost of recovery was significant for the many “mom and pop” businesses and Calgary’s current downtown economy is not contributing to revitalization.

Additionally, many property owners and merchants, now in their 60 to 80s, are actively considering selling their property and businesses and retiring. 

Chinatown At A Glance

  • 49 retail shops

  • 46 restaurants

  • 10 grocery/butcher/seafood

  • 11 personal services

  • 16 medical/pharmacy/Traditional Chinese Medicine

  • 16 salons

  • 6  business services

  • 23 corporate offices

Screen Shot 2018-11-05 at 3.21.18 PM.png

Change is in the wind…

“Chinatown needs private investment and development plus a relaxation of municipal bylaws (esp. parking) to revitalize the commercial/retail sector of this community,” says Terry Wong, Executive Director of the Chinatown District Business Improvement Area (BIA). 

The BIA, now three years old, has been working diligently with the City, businesses, property owners and various community groups to create a shared vision and plan to help Calgary’s Chinatown thrive in the 21stcentury. The vision is to enhance Calgary’s Chinatown as an iconic and cultural placevalued locally and nationally for its heritage, vitality, streetscape and architecture.  The goal is to create a walkable, accessible and livable community, a thriving authentic small-business district, an intergenerational social and community hub, and a tourist destination. 

The mega mixed use development being presented to City Council for approval could be the catalyst to make this happen, or it could be the end of Calgary’s historic Chinatown.  It depends on who you are talking to. 

El Condor Land Development at a glance:

  • 524      residential units

  • 150      hotel rooms

  • 23        commercial units

  • 470      parking stalls

  • 466      bike stalls 

Note the project has almost as many bike stalls as vehicle ones, I am not aware of any project in Calgary that has equal bike/car parking.

Note the project has almost as many bike stalls as vehicle ones, I am not aware of any project in Calgary that has equal bike/car parking.

The BIA says…

“The BIA and other Chinatown stakeholders have worked with the City to establish eight guiding principles for future Chinatown development and the planned establishment of a ‘Cultural Plan for Chinatown’ and a ‘Culturally-based Local Area Plan’ as directed by City Council in 2016. A ‘Made in Calgary’ Cultural Plan will define what should be the culturally distinct characteristics (i.e. social, economic, environmental) of Calgary’s Chinatown” says Wong. 

 He adds, “This would then lead to defining how this 9-square block community should be developed and revitalized through land development, the new or renovation buildings, transportation and pedestrian streetscape, recreation and public spaces.” 

“The BIA and Chinatown community are generally in favour of new development as a path to Chinatown renewal, but they want to be sure it is designed in a way that will benefit everyone – other property owners, business, residents, community and visitors who are there to shop, dine or be entertained,” states Wong.   

Currently Wong says the community is not in favour of the proposed development, however, they would be if three key amendments are made. 

Changes Needed 

First, there should be no entrances or exits for the underground parkade on 2ndAvenue. That’s in keeping with the vision for 2nd Avenue SW is that it will become their pedestrian oriented Main Street from 2nd St SW to Riverfront Avenue with the Chinese Cultural Centre in the middle.

This makes good sense given the Green Line will have an underground station at 2nd St and 2nd Ave SW, making the area ideal for a pedestrian oriented shopping and dining promenade linking Eau Claire to Chinatown and ultimately, to East Village. 

Second, they are concerned the current development permit has commercial space (retail/restaurants) only at street level and doesn’t allow for a major anchor tenant needed to make Chinatown a more attractive city-wide destination. If the new development is going to be the catalyst for the revitalization of the Chinatown, it will need to provide quality retail and restaurants space not only for today, but into the future. A two-floor commercial space (of higher) would allow for +15 connection to Sun Life Towers.

The current plan has no +15 connection to the Sun Life Towers across 3rdAvenue, which they feel is critical to the success of the development and will provide a much-needed link to tens of thousands of downtown office workers just a few blocks away.

 I must agree with this. One of the failures of Eau Claire Market was that it didn’t have a +15 link, in effect “isolating” the shops from the downtown workers during Calgary’s long winters. I also think having a +15 link to the downtown would be a huge differentiator for the residential towers, given there are very few residential towers in the City Centre with a +15 connection to downtown. Imagine not having to put a coat on in the winter to go to work every day; this would be a huge selling feature. 

Finally, the fourth concern of the BIA is that the hotel tower is in the wrong spot. The BIA supports a right-sized, quality hotel placed on 3rd Avenue and 1st Street SW where there is mid-point access to downtown, the Green Line LRT plus the existing 7th Avenue north-south and east-west LRT lines, the Chinese Cultural Centre, Chinatown retail, and the riverfront park and pathway system. This placement would also preserve 2nd Avenue as the pedestrian-oriented ‘linking promenade’ Main Street while allowing current multi-residential tenants the comfort of knowing roads and sidewalks are both comfortable and safe to walk on.

All reasonable requests you would think! 

It should be noted Wong is a former manager at The City of Calgary and fully understands land use, transportation, and community neighbourhoods. Additionally, having grown up in Vancouver’s Chinatown during the 60s and 70s, he is fully aware of Chinese community and retail culture and does not want to see the loss of Calgary’s culturally distinct Chinatown like has already happened in Vancouver.

Proposed entrance to mid-block mews that would connect 2nd and 3rd Avenues SW with shops and restaurants.

Proposed entrance to mid-block mews that would connect 2nd and 3rd Avenues SW with shops and restaurants.

Community Engagement Consultant says…

Lourdes Juan, an urban planner with strong ties to the Asian community (note Chinatown is more of an Asian town these days with the last three new restaurants being Korean) was hired by the developer in May 2018 to help work with all the stakeholders to understand their concerns and listen to their ideas and help the community understand how the proposed project links with the community’s vision while also meeting economic and urban design realities.  

The developer has spent $100,000 and the City over $400,000 in community engagement initiatives since the proposed Land Use change and project design was unveiled. Literally thousands of hours have been spent working with the stakeholders to explain the development and why it is designed in the manner it is.  Translators were at every meeting and all documents were translated into Chinese to make sure everyone understood what was being said and being proposed.

Juan told me that each of the above issues have been addressed with the community but unfortunately not everyone was prepared to accept the rationale for why the City and/or the developer wants the projects developed the way it is being proposed.

First, the City is not interested in additional parking at the site, as it is adjacent to the new underground 2ndSt LRT station for the Green Line and only four blocks from the 7thAvenue Transit corridor.  The focus of the development will be on transit-oriented development, not auto-oriented.  

The developer’s research indicates that second floor retail doesn’t work in Chinatown today, and that the proposed development doesn’t have a commercial podium at its base, like office buildings downtown.   Rather, the project is designed with a mid-block mews from 2nd to 3rd Ave SW that will allow pedestrians to wander 23 small independent shops and restaurants along the mews, rather than national franchised shops.  

They did indicate that provisions will be made for a potential +15 connection from Sun Life Plaza at a future date.  

The hotel location also makes sense when you understand how the mews works and other restrictions of the site that is too complicated to explain here.

It has been very frustrating from both the City and the Juan’s perspective as they have tried very hard to communicate how the project’s design (by Perkins + Will’s Calgary office) will benefit the community.  

It should be noted that Juan is a young, independent urban planner who is uniquely connected not only to Calgary’s Chinese community, but also Calgary at large. Despite working very hard to document and communicate how the proposed project fits with the community’s eight principles, she couldn’t get the BIA and some other community leaders to support the proposed project.

Next Step    

Now it is up to Council to make the final approval. Council can’t make any amendments to the project, they can only approve it or reject. If rejected, the developer would have to continue to modify the project to get community and Council support. If approved, the community could appeal this decision to the Development Appeal Board.

I do know Councillor Farrell’s and her Dale Calkins her Senior Policy & Planning Advisor have been working with the community, applicant, and City planners on this project for the past 3.5 years. And that it has been incredibly challenging, as everyone wants to ensure Chinatown is a vibrant, resilient, and complete community.

“They just disagree on what that exactly looks like and how to get there.”

The site is currently a surface parking lot, which is full during the week with office workers parking all day, but empty most evenings and weekends as are lots of parking lots in the downtown.

The site is currently a surface parking lot, which is full during the week with office workers parking all day, but empty most evenings and weekends as are lots of parking lots in the downtown.

Last Word

I always say “no plan is perfect. You can’t please everyone.” And the old saying “there is more than one way to skin a cat” might apply here too.  

This is a huge development that will shape the future of Chinatown for decades, so yes, it is important to get it right. But right for whom!

While some in the community will lament the loss of their surface parking lot, the reality is the best thing that can happen for Chinatown is the parking lot gets developed. Surely, the addition of a 150-room hotel, 500+ new homes and 20+ new retail/restaurant spaces will add much needed vitality our struggling Chinatown.  And hopefully, spur on other property owners and shop keepers to up their game.  

That’s my opinion after chatting with both sides.  And it hasn’t changed from when I first wrote about this proposal back in July 2016 in my Calgary Herald column.

Link:What is the future of Calgary’s Chinatown”  

Calgary’s Chinatown needs to attract more young people to live, work, play and invest in the community.

Calgary’s Chinatown needs to attract more young people to live, work, play and invest in the community.

Balcony Fun?

When in Dubai many years ago, I was gobsmacked by the spectrum of balcony designs in its old town.  In fact, balconies were the signature design feature of the streetscape.

Since then, I have often taken photos of buildings with interesting balconies, but haven’t done anything with them, until recently when a colleague suggested it would be an interesting subject.  

So I gathered up some of my photos (unfortunately I don’t have any of the Dubai photos), did a little research and made balconies the subject of my November Condoscape column for Condo Living magazine.

Berlin

Berlin

Berlin

Berlin

Calgary

Calgary

Halifax

Halifax

Halifax

Halifax

Montreal

Montreal

Theory vs Reality

In theory, a balcony is like the front porch of a house, a place to sit and watch the world go by.  It is an outdoor living/dining room where you can read, nap, chat, listen to music, browse on the laptop and even BBQ a gourmet meal.  It can even be your outdoor office space for part of the year.  

Yet in reality, in Calgary it is often too windy or too cold to do the above very often. Or, if your balcony faces south or west, it can be too hot and too sunny to be out on the balcony. You can’t win!  

Florence

Florence

Berlin

Berlin

Berlin

Berlin

Private vs Common Area 

Many first-time condo owners think the balcony is their private space. However, in most condos it is considered “common space” as it is maintained by the condo association, which means there are rules about what can and can’t be on the balcony.  Read your condo bylaws.

In Calgary, the balcony is not a place to hang your clean laundry, unlike in Europe where you often see clothes neatly hung out to dry, creating a charm to the streetscape – in my opinion.  Something often lacking in our sterile North American urban landscapes.  

Berlin

Berlin

Berlin

Berlin

Berlin (same building as above)

Berlin (same building as above)

Berlin

Berlin

Berlin

Berlin

So, what makes for a good balcony? 

  • Not so deep as to prevent sunlight entering the apartment below.

  • Large enough to comfortably accommodate least two chairs, small table and a BBQ.  

  • Screens and/or wall to filter sunlight and wind, as well as privacy. 

  • Located away from noisy equipment and garbage areas.

Calgary

Calgary

Did You know… 

Balconies are a requirement in Calgary’s Land Use Bylaw. However, the City will relax this requirement if there are adequate equal common amenity area either inside or outside.

Balconies can contribute to the safety of the street as the people on them are eyes on the street. 

“Overlooking” from balconies is a big issue for adjacent neighbours living in single-family homes in inner-city condo development. Bruce McKenzie VP Operations at NORR’s Calgary’s office said, “the City is encouraging semi-recessed balconies on most urban sites. This provides some sheltering and to some extent discourages overlooking.”  

Atlanta

Atlanta

Types of balconies 

A recessed balcony is one that is set into the building’s façade, rather than jutting out from it.  Some think recessed balconies are best because they provide better privacy and better protection from the weather. Some also like the sleek look they give the façade of the building. 

A cantilevered balcony hangs out over the side of the building, exposing it to the wind, rain and snow.  From round to square, rectangular to triangular, the shape and repetition of the balcony adds a texture and pattern, that contributes to the distinct aesthetic statement of the building. 

A Romeo & Juliet balcony is just railings attached to the outside of the building with in-swing doors or sliders. 

Calgary

Calgary

Calgary

Calgary

Calgary

Calgary

Calgary

Calgary

Last Word

Look at any condo anytime and you rarely see anyone out on the balcony. So why do they have them?  In a winter city, wouldn’t it make more sense to have that space inside the condo where it would be useable year-round? 

Apparently not. In chatting with a few condo dwellers, they all love their balconies, keeping heaters and blankets close by so they can use them as much as possible.   

Several architects and developers indicated large balconies are a big selling feature, helping to differentiate one condo project from another.  Although, I was also told shared roof-top patios are quickly becoming the “in-thing” for outdoor living of condo dwellers. 

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Calgary Condos: A Pop Of Colour

Condo Design: Lobby Appeal

New Condos: Hidden/Invisible Density

 

 

2018: The Summer of Murals (Northern Hills Mural Project)  

While NHMP isn’t as catchy acronym as BUMP (the Beltline mural program I shared with you last week), it has more community buy-in than any public art / mural program Calgary has ever seen.  The idea for the mural came from Kim Walker an artist living in the community who saw the 850 meter six-foot high blank residential fence along several blocks of Country Hills Blvd as a blank canvas.  

Screen Shot 2018-10-08 at 1.58.02 PM.png

History of Calgary

Walker thought what if the fence, instead of being a barrier, brought the community together and became a source of community pride?  

Working with the City of Calgary and 40 individual homeowners who each owned part of the fence, she and another volunteer Laura Hack, were able to get everyone onside to create what would become Canada’s longest outdoor mural.  

Screen Shot 2018-10-08 at 1.58.24 PM.png

A Northern Hills Mural Project Committee was formed to manage the project and conduct extensive community engagement.

They obtained funding to allow them to hire an experienced artist to help create the design based on the theme “History of Calgary.”

Local artist, Mark Vazquez-Mackay was chosen from an open request for proposals, based on his painting expertise and teaching skills. Vazquez-Mackay’s role was to develop the mural design and paint a template (think huge colouring book) of the various icons and images identified by the community to trace Calgary’s history from the glaciers to the present in small sections along the along the 850 meter fence.  

Walker and Vazquez-Mackay then organized volunteer artists to oversee 150 foot sections the fence to help guide individuals and families in painting specific section based on their interests, to paint in the details of Vazquez-Mackay sketch.

Screen Shot 2018-10-08 at 1.59.16 PM.png

The fence was painted in 3 days over the August long weekend as hundreds volunteer muralist mostly from the community, but with some help from Calgarians from other communities and even outside the Calgary.  

Most had little or no painting experience but that didn’t deter them.

And finally, with a little touch up by Vazquez-Mackay, Walker, Makenna Millot and Josh Chilton the mural was completed and unveiled on Sept 22, 2018 at a community celebration.  

Images range from Calgary’s first train to the 1886 fire, from Fort Calgary to the ’88 Olympics, from the Stanley Cup to the Grey Cup, from VIVO Centre to whiskey traders. 

The community raised a total of $63,000 in cash and in-kind donations in three months to pay to repair the fence (some boards were rotting) and to scrape and pressure wash the fence.  Then approximately 415 gallons of paint products (paint, three coats of UV protection and one coats of anti-graffiti protections) were used to ensure the mural stays looking fresh for at least the next eight years.

Everyone is invited to come and see the, bring visiting family and friends to learn about history of Calgary and or our city’s amazing community spirit.   

It truly was a community effort.

It truly was a community effort.

Last Word

Indeed, the summer of 2018 will be remembered as the “Summer of Murals,” not only for the Beltline and Northern Hills projects but for several other mural projects.  

The Downtown West community also initiated a mural program with two provocative pieces on the side of buildings (two more are in progress) and Calgary Municipal Land Corporation commissioned a mural for the 4th Street SE underpass linking East Village to Stampede Park.

It will be interesting to see how all of these murals age. Will they become valued community icons or will they just quietly fade away.  

If so, perhaps that is OK, public art doesn’t have to be permanent. 

While some public art has received a negative reaction from the public, all of the murals have been well received by their community. Perhaps there is a lesson to be learned here i.e. let the community initiate and manage the public art program.  

I truly hope the Beltline, Northern Hills and the Downtown West mural projects meet a better fate than previous attempts in Calgary to use murals and public art to create a sense of community.  

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

2018 Summer of Murals: Beltline

Vancouver: Mural Festival Fun & Fantasy

Doug Driediger: Public Art That Is Uplifting!

2018: The Summer of Murals (Beltline)

Do murals enhance neighbourhoods?   Do they foster community pride? Do they make people stop, look and ponder? 

Natalie Nehlawi’s playful mural is meant to “activate the imagination about a species vital to our ecosystem.”

Natalie Nehlawi’s playful mural is meant to “activate the imagination about a species vital to our ecosystem.”

Mikhail Miller and Rachel Ziriada’s playful mural reminds me of Matisse’s cut-out artworks.

Mikhail Miller and Rachel Ziriada’s playful mural reminds me of Matisse’s cut-out artworks.

Do we expect too much?

This summer two major mural projects were undertaken in Calgary - one in the Beltline, the other in Northern Hills (a coalition of four communities), both with the goal of enhancing their community.  The Beltline Urban Mural Program (BUMP) was the more traditional model where professional artists were selected to create murals on blank walls throughout the community. The Northern Hills Mural Project (NHMP) was more community-based with hundreds of community members, as well as others from across the City and beyond helping to paint an 850 meter fence along a section of Country Hills Blvd. 

Both were successful in generating lots of social media and community attention, but how long before the thrill of the new murals fade, just as the murals themselves will?  This is not the first time and won’t be the last where murals and public art have been used to try to enhance a neighbourhood. 

Do we expect too much from public art to transform ugly, boring urban spaces into something fun and attractive?

Screen Shot 2018-10-02 at 2.00.59 PM.png
Faith47’s BUMP mural

Faith47’s BUMP mural

Jill Stanton’s mural pays homage to Calgary’s upscale cowboy culture on the side of Gravity Pope one of the city’s best fashion boutiques.

Jill Stanton’s mural pays homage to Calgary’s upscale cowboy culture on the side of Gravity Pope one of the city’s best fashion boutiques.

BUMP

“Our vision is to use powerful, awe-inspiring, whimsical, thought-provoking and stunning art to create beautiful places, invoke dialogue, challenge ideas and foster connections,” says the BUMP website. Link: BUMP website

Those are lofty expectations for the 15 murals which range from the decorative to narrative, mysterious to indigenous and fantasy to illustrative.  There was even a BUMP Festival, Aug 30 to Sept 1stwith tours of the murals, artists talks and an alley party.  I participated in two of the tours which attracted about 100 people each and heard only positive comments about the murals and the project.   

One of the murals that stood out for me was Los Angeles, artist Faith47’s huge cougar with the words “Fortes et Liber” on the side.  Not sure I understand the context of the cougar which appears to be ready to pounce on an unsuspecting pedestrian, however, the Latin words for “strong and free” make some sense given Canada’s national anthem. The mural’s scale (10 storeys) and its monochromatic brownish wash gives it a dream-like quality that looks like it is already fading away.  

Montreal’s Kevin Ledo’s mural on the west side of the Calgary Parking Authority’s City Centre Parkade at 10thAve and 5thStreet SW was also well received.  This artwork, with its huge indigenous figure staring into the Beltline community has a look of contemplation. Only later, when I checked the website did I learn the title of this piece is “Sohkatisiwin” Cree for “Strength/Power.”

An interesting choice given Calgary is located in the traditional territory of the Blackfoot Nation, not the Cree and the artist is from Montreal. Nor did I realize the figure is a real person - Angela Gladue, an internationally recognized dancer in both aboriginal and hip hop genres.  Not sure how this all relates to the Beltline or Calgary.

Although, BUMP’s website has a complete list of the murals and info on the artists, I found most of the jargon-loaded text not very helpful in understanding the context of the work to the Beltline’s sense of place.

There is a printable map of the murals, which would make for a fun walkabout on a nice fall or winter afternoon.  

The funding for the murals came from the Beltline Community Investment Fund, City of Calgary Parking Revenue Reinvestment Program and mural sponsors - Battistella Developments and Hotel Arts. 

Screen Shot 2018-10-02 at 12.41.42 PM.png
Kevin Ledo mural on 4th St at 10th Ave SW

Kevin Ledo mural on 4th St at 10th Ave SW

Kalum Teke Dan’s mural in progress on the side of 17th Ave Framing. It is intended to “develop understanding and foster reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples.”

Kalum Teke Dan’s mural in progress on the side of 17th Ave Framing. It is intended to “develop understanding and foster reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples.”

Last Word

This is not the first time Calgary’s City Centre communities have tried to use public art to make them a more interesting place to live and visit. 

In the ‘90s, the Uptown 17thBusiness Revitalization Zone (BRZ) organized a series of murals created by well-known Calgary artists on the side of buildings to create an outdoor art gallery.  Unfortunately, after many years, they were removed as “mother nature” had gotten the better of them.

The 4th Street BRZ commissioned sculptures to be located along the street also in the 90s. While many of them are still there, I doubt anyone would say they have become valued community icons.  

I hope the BUMP murals will indeed become an attraction for more people to want to live and visit the Beltine. 

Below are some other murals in the Beltline….

In the relatively new Thompson Family Park there is a decorative mural with the words “The Readiness is All” embedded in it. The phrase comes from Shakespeare’s Hamlet where Hamlet debates the meaning of life….

In the relatively new Thompson Family Park there is a decorative mural with the words “The Readiness is All” embedded in it. The phrase comes from Shakespeare’s Hamlet where Hamlet debates the meaning of life….

Found this mural while on the BUMP tour in someone’s backyard. Interesting mix of nature and indigenous elements.

Found this mural while on the BUMP tour in someone’s backyard. Interesting mix of nature and indigenous elements.

I love the series of paintings along the fence of playground next to Connaught elementary school that speaks to issue of “belonging.” They have aged well, and are perfect message for the Beltline one of Calgary’s most diverse neighbourhoods, including many new Canadians.

I love the series of paintings along the fence of playground next to Connaught elementary school that speaks to issue of “belonging.” They have aged well, and are perfect message for the Beltline one of Calgary’s most diverse neighbourhoods, including many new Canadians.

Brad Lamb: Big On Calgary's Beltline Beat 

Recently, I had a chance to sit down with Brad Lamb, arguably Canada’s most active condo developer, in the comfy second floor lounge of his recently completed 6th and Tenth condo on in Calgary’s Beltline to get his insights into Calgary’s City Centre condo market. 

Lamb, a Toronto realtor and developer, has sold 29,000 condos for over $8.5 billion since 1988. He currently has 25 projects at various stages of development in Ontario.  His record in Alberta is not as impressive – cancelling two projects in Edmonton and one in Calgary (Orchard in Victoria Park).  Link: Lamb Development Corp.

Yet, Lamb is still very high on Alberta and especially Calgary.  

Brad Lamb’s 6th & Tenth condo is one of several new condo towers in Caglary’s hip Beltline district. 10th Avenue SW next to the CPR’s main line was once a warehouse district, today it is quickly becoming a trendy street with bars, restaurants, condos, a new hotel and even a very busy bottle depot.

Brad Lamb’s 6th & Tenth condo is one of several new condo towers in Caglary’s hip Beltline district. 10th Avenue SW next to the CPR’s main line was once a warehouse district, today it is quickly becoming a trendy street with bars, restaurants, condos, a new hotel and even a very busy bottle depot.

Like Toronto’s King West Neighbourhood 

When asked what he liked about Calgary’s City Centre, Lamb quickly answered, “I love the Manhattan-esque landscape with the two rivers creating an island in the middle of the city.  

 He also likes the young party scene and the excellent restaurants. “When I am thinking of developing in a new city or new community, I do is a walkabout to see if there are lots of hip people on the streets, in the restaurants and bars; these are my buyers.”

He loves the Beltline beat, “it reminds me of King West in Toronto in 2004.” FYI. King West is a trendy urban village in Toronto’s City Centre that is also nestled up against railway tracks. 

When asked what he didn’t like, he quipped “the bland pre-2008 office, residential and retail architecture. To me architecture is critical to creating an interesting place to live.” Ouch! He did say he likes The Bow, Telus Sky and Brookfield Place.  

Calgary’s Beltline is a funky mix of old and new architecture, with several urban parks and an increasing number of public artworks and murals. It has become a very popular place for millennials and empty nesters to live, work and play.

Calgary’s Beltline is a funky mix of old and new architecture, with several urban parks and an increasing number of public artworks and murals. It has become a very popular place for millennials and empty nesters to live, work and play.

Architecture & Urban Design

Lamb’s promotion of 6th and Tenth said it would be “unlike anything the city has seen before.” In looking at the finished building, I would say it is attractive but not outstanding.  It is unique in that it is set back from the sidewalk, allowing for small plaza with a water feature, seating and two big black horse sculptures. He hopes the plaza will become a popular Beltline meeting place. He is proud of the first-class commercial space on the main floor with its 25-foot high ceiling giving it a museum-like feel. He added that Lamb Corporation is retaining the space and looking for a high-end restaurant to locate there.

He was adamant “it won’t be a fast food or convenience store.” 

6th and Tenth’s mini plaza and water feature were designed to enhance the pedestrian experience and be a meeting place for those living in the area.

6th and Tenth’s mini plaza and water feature were designed to enhance the pedestrian experience and be a meeting place for those living in the area.

The plaza wraps around the tower and includes two large horse sculptures at the entrance off of 6th St. SW.

The plaza wraps around the tower and includes two large horse sculptures at the entrance off of 6th St. SW.

When I asked why he didn’t use local architects for his Calgary projects, he said he uses only two architectural firms, both in Toronto – Core Architects and The Design Agency.  As these two firms have been with him since the beginning, he enjoys a great working relationship with them that results in a better, faster and cheaper designs than if he worked with a different architect in each city. From his perspective, having a like-minded architect is critical to a successful project. He recognizes there are good architects in Calgary, but this being his first project in Calgary he didn’t want anything to go wrong. 

Backstory: The original design for 6thand Tenth was a brick building, but he couldn’t find anyone in Calgary to do that much brickwork cost effectively. Too bad, as brick has a timeless quality to it and would have respected the 10thAvenue’s historic brick warehouse past. It is interesting to note all of Calgary’s late ‘70s and early ‘80s condo towers were brick – Eau Claire 500, The Estate, Westmount Place, Riverstone and Roxboro House.

The Estate condo tower next to the Ranchman’s Club is one of several condos built in the late ‘70s early ‘80s with brick facades.

The Estate condo tower next to the Ranchman’s Club is one of several condos built in the late ‘70s early ‘80s with brick facades.

What about Orchard?

Then I asked the tough question “What happened with Orchard?” i.e.  the two-tower project with an urban orchard in the middle on 11thAvenue SE at the edge of the Stampede Grounds. Lamb was forthright saying “We had a great launch in November 2014 selling 50% of the units, but with the drop in oil prices shortly thereafter we didn’t sell many units after that. All the contracts had a clause stating we had to be in the ground by November 15, 2017 or the project would be cancelled and everyone gets their money back. It was a tough decision but we decided not to go ahead given Calgary’s current economic climate, on November 20th 2017, everyone got their money back. It was the prudent thing to do.” 

That being said, Lamb thinks Victoria Park and the plans Calgary Municipal Land Corporation is currently developing for the area are exciting. He added, “I hope the Mayor and Flames’ owners can find a way to work together to create an arena district. It is too good an opportunity to be missed.”

It would sure help his Orchard project become viable again. 

Lamb’s Orchard project consisted of two condo towers with a mini orchard in the middle along 12th Avenue SE.

Lamb’s Orchard project consisted of two condo towers with a mini orchard in the middle along 12th Avenue SE.

Calgary Municipal Land Corporation is currently working on a plan to redevelop Victoria Park one of Calgary oldest communities. The concept illustration above shows a new arena in pink, an expanded BMO Centre in middle left and a lots of new buildings between 12th Ave and the CPR railway tracks in yellow. It would be on a similar scale to the East Village mega makeover that won’t be completed until 2027 on the north side of the tracks.

Calgary Municipal Land Corporation is currently working on a plan to redevelop Victoria Park one of Calgary oldest communities. The concept illustration above shows a new arena in pink, an expanded BMO Centre in middle left and a lots of new buildings between 12th Ave and the CPR railway tracks in yellow. It would be on a similar scale to the East Village mega makeover that won’t be completed until 2027 on the north side of the tracks.

Last Word

Lamb was quick to say, “he plans on doing more Calgary projects once the condo market supply and demand situation improves.” It is obvious, he is pleased with how 6thand Tenth turned out and has not soured on the Calgary market. 

Reader Response:

JM…wrote to say that Lamb is not one of Canada’s biggest condo developers and in fact not even the biggest in Toronto. He sent this graphic:

Screen Shot 2018-10-15 at 1.06.41 PM.png

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Calgary’s 10th Ave Renaissance

Calgary’s Rail Trail

Beautifying The Beltline

 

 

Condo Living: Millennials, In Condos, Drinking Wine 

Recently I had a chance to chat over a glass of wine with four professional female millennials (two grew up in Calgary, one in Red Deer and one in Edmonton) who all live in Calgary’s City Centre about what they like and don’t like about urban living in our city. 

There are lots of things to see and do for millennials in Calgary’s Beltline community.

There are lots of things to see and do for millennials in Calgary’s Beltline community.

However, the #1 reason millennials choose to live in Calgary’s Beltline community is the ability to walk to work.

However, the #1 reason millennials choose to live in Calgary’s Beltline community is the ability to walk to work.

Work, Live, Play

Screen Shot 2018-10-05 at 1.21.17 PM.png

It was unanimous, the key factor in choosing to live downtown was being close to work - no more than a 15-minute walk to work.  A close second was walking distance to lots restaurants and bars.  The key word being LOTS, as eating and drinking was their main source of entertainment.  

This explain to why the bars and restaurants are busy despite the decline in the downtown economy that has been puzzling me and my baby boomer friends for the past few years.  

17th Avenue and 4th Street is the epicenter of their entertainment, Stephen Ave and Kensington wasn’t really on their radar.  

I was surprised safety was not a huge issue. Even when one of them has to walk to work from Mission to downtown at 5:30 am and another lives near Alpha House.

They all recognized there are unsafe places where they wouldn’t walk alone, but with friends they felt safe everywhere. They did lament that Central Memorial Park is beautiful but wouldn’t go there at night. 

Shopping wasn’t a big factor in their lives, but access to a gym was probably the third most important amenity.  

When asked “what was missing in the way of shops” they all agreed it would be nice to have a have a Walmart, Costco, HomeSense or London Drugs somewhere to get more things for the home. They were all glad to learn Canadian Tire was coming to The Royal as they had heard the deal was dead.  

Some millennials enjoying the new Beltline murals. Note the Bridal advertisement….there are often bridal billboards in the Beltline. Coincidence?

Some millennials enjoying the new Beltline murals. Note the Bridal advertisement….there are often bridal billboards in the Beltline. Coincidence?

 Other things they would like to see in the Beltline were a bowling alley, rock climbing wall, an outdoor curling rink and more community gardens and events like the Inglewood night market

I asked them what they thought of the new Beltline mural program and they all agreed it really didn’t interest them, even though one knew one of the mural artists.  

This led to an interesting discussion of how each City Center community appeals to a specific sector of the millennial population.  From their perspective, Bridgeland, Inglewood and Kensington are where the trendy people live - artists and hipsters. Beltline and Mission are more for the young yuppies.  

They like the Beltline best because it has lots of new condos with better insulation against noise and better security systems. Mission would be a more attractive place to live if it has more new condos and East Village wasn’t really on their radar yet - still too new. 

IMG_6776.JPG

When I asked if they had gotten to know their neighbours, they all said yes. But they quickly added connecting with neighbors isn’t really important to them, as hang with friends.

They all agreed the Beltline is a friendly place where it is easy to get to know people.

One said, “It might not be Vancouver (where she was living before moving to Calgary), but I was shocked how good Calgary is when it comes to restaurant and bars and it is way safer as you don’t have to dodge all the umbrellas. And people are much friendlier.”

All agreed they wouldn’t continue to live in the City Centre for long, probably a few years before they either moved on to other cities for professional opportunities or decided to buy a house outside the city centre. One even has chosen their forever community – Altadore.   

While most young Beltliners will move away when they start to have a family, not all do as evidenced by the playgrounds and schools in the area.

While most young Beltliners will move away when they start to have a family, not all do as evidenced by the playgrounds and schools in the area.

The new Canadian Tire and Urban Fare grocery store as part of The Royal condo project will be a welcome addition to the Beltline .

The new Canadian Tire and Urban Fare grocery store as part of The Royal condo project will be a welcome addition to the Beltline.

Last Word

As I looked around the 550ish square foot condo I couldn’t help but think how different the world is today, then when I was in my 20s. There was no TV, no huge stereo unit, no dining table, just a comfy contemporary couch and a couple of chairs with floor to ceiling windows looking out over downtown.  

The place was minimalist, just like in a magazine it was almost like no-one lived there, however, in really, they are living the good life along the streets of our City Centre. And they know it.

Note: An edited version of this blog was commissioned for the 2018 October issue of Condo Living Magazine.

Living the good life in the Beltline…

Living the good life in the Beltline…