Everyday Tourist's Best Flaneur Finds of 2018

For those of you who follow me on Twitter, you will have seen some of these photos as I often tweet out my “Best Flaneur Finds” when I get home from a day of wandering. Sometimes it is just one photo, sometimes as many as four.

I thought it would be fun to collect some of the best “Flaneur Finds” of 2018 in a blog and share with those who aren’t on Twitter.

Hope you enjoy!

Link: Ten Commandments Of A Flaneur

This huge rubric cube (sorry it isn’t functional, that would be very cool) in Calgary’s Beltline is a fun surprise to those driving and walking by.

This huge rubric cube (sorry it isn’t functional, that would be very cool) in Calgary’s Beltline is a fun surprise to those driving and walking by.

I had to smile when I found this Pegasus figure in the yard of a scaffolding warehouse in Calgary’s Manchester community. How clever? Is this public art? I say “Yes!”

I had to smile when I found this Pegasus figure in the yard of a scaffolding warehouse in Calgary’s Manchester community. How clever? Is this public art? I say “Yes!”

I love public art that is fun, clever and in unexpected places…more of this please in 2019!  Calgary’s  +15 indoor walkway was full of art, it is Canada’s most unique public art gallery.

I love public art that is fun, clever and in unexpected places…more of this please in 2019! Calgary’s +15 indoor walkway was full of art, it is Canada’s most unique public art gallery.

Loved this whirly-gig artwork along Atlanta’s Beltline multi-use pathway. Love to see more of this in 2019!

Loved this whirly-gig artwork along Atlanta’s Beltline multi-use pathway. Love to see more of this in 2019!

Further along Atlanta’s Beltline I found this banner on a construction site. Love to see more of this at construction sites….simple to do and thoughtful!

Further along Atlanta’s Beltline I found this banner on a construction site. Love to see more of this at construction sites….simple to do and thoughtful!

This mirrored cash machine on the plaza outside an Atlanta office building is a stroke of genius. It became an ever changing sculpture that animated the plaza is a way a static sculpture could never do. Why don’t we see more of this?

This mirrored cash machine on the plaza outside an Atlanta office building is a stroke of genius. It became an ever changing sculpture that animated the plaza is a way a static sculpture could never do. Why don’t we see more of this?

Downtown Calgary’s architecture is full of intriguing patterns, textures and juxtaposition. Remember to always look up!

Downtown Calgary’s architecture is full of intriguing patterns, textures and juxtaposition. Remember to always look up!

The patina and words on this door in Hamilton harkens back to a different time.

The patina and words on this door in Hamilton harkens back to a different time.

A free philosophy lesson in Saskatoon’s downtown warehouse district.

A free philosophy lesson in Saskatoon’s downtown warehouse district.

Found this friendly, front yard in Calgary’s Parkdale community. Love the free Little Libraries I find everywhere I go. I hope the addition of front yard seating will also catch on. How pedestrian friendly is this?

Found this friendly, front yard in Calgary’s Parkdale community. Love the free Little Libraries I find everywhere I go. I hope the addition of front yard seating will also catch on. How pedestrian friendly is this?

Love this play on the term “couch potato” by Regina artist, Victor Cicansky in the window at the Glenbow in downtown Calgary. It had a personal meaning for me as I have small Cicansky piece of a chair with a potato in our collection. I must get to the Glenbow more in 2019!

Love this play on the term “couch potato” by Regina artist, Victor Cicansky in the window at the Glenbow in downtown Calgary. It had a personal meaning for me as I have small Cicansky piece of a chair with a potato in our collection. I must get to the Glenbow more in 2019!

By chance I looked out the window of my financial advisor’s office in downtown Calgary and saw this amazing view of the sky-light of The Core shopping centre. It is the longest point supported structural skylight in the world. Not sure exactly what that means, but it is impressive inside and out. Remember to always look out the window in 2019!

By chance I looked out the window of my financial advisor’s office in downtown Calgary and saw this amazing view of the sky-light of The Core shopping centre. It is the longest point supported structural skylight in the world. Not sure exactly what that means, but it is impressive inside and out. Remember to always look out the window in 2019!

Speaking of windows, I love the giant abstract / surrealistic art created by the reflections in glass facades of contemporary office towers every time I wander downtown. They are like giant Dali paintings.

Speaking of windows, I love the giant abstract / surrealistic art created by the reflections in glass facades of contemporary office towers every time I wander downtown. They are like giant Dali paintings.

Found this little guy while golfing at Redwood Meadows. Yes golfing can be a flaneuring activity.

Found this little guy while golfing at Redwood Meadows. Yes golfing can be a flaneuring activity.

Went to explore a rock garden, found a cemetery and then this. Almost side by side were two similar graves one with my surname and one with that of our next door neighbour who we are very close to. Yikes….

Went to explore a rock garden, found a cemetery and then this. Almost side by side were two similar graves one with my surname and one with that of our next door neighbour who we are very close to. Yikes….

Found this carnival mask in the quaint Kensington Hardware store. One of the great things about flaneuring is find fun things in the strangest places.

Found this carnival mask in the quaint Kensington Hardware store. One of the great things about flaneuring is find fun things in the strangest places.

I didn’t remember taking this photo while on a walking tour of BUMP (Beltline Urban Mural Program). But when I got home and was flaneuring the photos I took that day I discovered this one and immediately thought “this could be the definitive portrait of happiness in the 21st century.”

I didn’t remember taking this photo while on a walking tour of BUMP (Beltline Urban Mural Program). But when I got home and was flaneuring the photos I took that day I discovered this one and immediately thought “this could be the definitive portrait of happiness in the 21st century.”

While wandering Inglewood’s funky Main Street I found this fun chair. Ironically, I have been looking for a Netflix binging chair for over a year. I didn’t have the balls to buy it!

While wandering Inglewood’s funky Main Street I found this fun chair. Ironically, I have been looking for a Netflix binging chair for over a year. I didn’t have the balls to buy it!

Found this strange shadow sidewalk art in downtown Calgary across from the Bow office tower. It is created by the ornamental chain-linked fence that surrounds a future building site. Kudos to the developer (I expect with some push from the City) to create something more ornamental vs ordinary. More of this in 2019 please!

Found this strange shadow sidewalk art in downtown Calgary across from the Bow office tower. It is created by the ornamental chain-linked fence that surrounds a future building site. Kudos to the developer (I expect with some push from the City) to create something more ornamental vs ordinary. More of this in 2019 please!

Was wandering Hamilton’s City Centre when this guy rides his bike up on the sidewalk behind me and says “what are you doing?” I was taking photo of house with a funky porch. Turns out it was his sister’s place. We chatted about flaneuring and then I noticed his rings. I asked if I could take a photo of him and his rings and he was happy to oblige.

Was wandering Hamilton’s City Centre when this guy rides his bike up on the sidewalk behind me and says “what are you doing?” I was taking photo of house with a funky porch. Turns out it was his sister’s place. We chatted about flaneuring and then I noticed his rings. I asked if I could take a photo of him and his rings and he was happy to oblige.

I love flaneuring the books at thrift stores as you find the most amazing juxtaposition of ideas, images and ideologies - like this one in Saskatoon.

I love flaneuring the books at thrift stores as you find the most amazing juxtaposition of ideas, images and ideologies - like this one in Saskatoon.

Found this while flaneuring in Halifax. It was in the gallery space of the Provincial Archives building and struck a cord with me as I love colour. Ironically the text and fame are black except for the word “outside?” Is this the artist’s subtle statement? Flaneuring can be thought provoking.

Found this while flaneuring in Halifax. It was in the gallery space of the Provincial Archives building and struck a cord with me as I love colour. Ironically the text and fame are black except for the word “outside?” Is this the artist’s subtle statement? Flaneuring can be thought provoking.

Another provocative flaneur find from Calgary’s Inglewood community. I have probably wander this street a dozen or more times and never noticed this small 1918 church with its tiny plaque above the door. The quote says, “Lift up a standard for the people.” Isa 62:10. with two soldier-like figures trying to plant a flag with waves crashing around them. Enough said?

Another provocative flaneur find from Calgary’s Inglewood community. I have probably wander this street a dozen or more times and never noticed this small 1918 church with its tiny plaque above the door. The quote says, “Lift up a standard for the people.” Isa 62:10. with two soldier-like figures trying to plant a flag with waves crashing around them. Enough said?

Another book shelf find, this time at the new Central Library in downtown Calgary. This would make for an interesting 2019 reading project.

Another book shelf find, this time at the new Central Library in downtown Calgary. This would make for an interesting 2019 reading project.

Found this in a display case at the Robert C. Williams Museum of Papermaking, on the campus of the Georgia Tech in Atlanta. If you are in Atlanta, the museum is definitely worth a visit.

Found this in a display case at the Robert C. Williams Museum of Papermaking, on the campus of the Georgia Tech in Atlanta. If you are in Atlanta, the museum is definitely worth a visit.

Last Word

If you haven’t tried flaneuring, I would encourage you to do so in 2019.

If you like this blog, you might like:

Calgary vs Halifax: Urban Playgrounds

I expect it would come as a surprise to many Calgarians (and Canadians) to learn there are a significant number of similarities between Halifax, a port city created as a military base in 1749 and Calgary, a land-locked, prairie city established as a Northwest Mounted Police Fort in 1875.  

Both are becoming fun urban playgrounds.

Halifax’s telephone poles are plastered with posters promoting various fun events. They create a playful streetscape.

Halifax’s telephone poles are plastered with posters promoting various fun events. They create a playful streetscape.

Halifax’s Sunday Flea Market at the old Forum, is very similar to Calgary’s Hillhurst/Sunnyside Flea Market also on Sunday.

Halifax’s Sunday Flea Market at the old Forum, is very similar to Calgary’s Hillhurst/Sunnyside Flea Market also on Sunday.

No Grand Street

The first similarity I found was the lack of a grand, ceremonial main street with a boulevard.  After a bit of wandering downtown, I stumbled upon Halifax’s Argyle Street which looks a lot like Calgary’s Stephen Avenue with its pedestrian-friendly sidewalks full of patios.  

It is home to Halifax’s shiny new convention centre and the iconic Neptune Theatre complex, not unlike Stephen Avenue’s Telus Convention Centre and Art Commons, our theatre complex.

Also, on Argyle Street is Halifax’s Grand Parade, a historic military parade square dating back to 1749, not unlike Calgary’s Olympic Plaza, albeit newer, anchoring the east end of Stephen Avenue. 

Halifax’s Argyle Street with its new convention centre office tower in the background has the mix of the old and the new reminded me of Calgary’s Stephen Avenue.

Halifax’s Argyle Street with its new convention centre office tower in the background has the mix of the old and the new reminded me of Calgary’s Stephen Avenue.

Historic information panels were scattered around the different City Centre neighbourhoods. It made for interesting flaneuring. Calgary does something similar on its electrical boxes.

Historic information panels were scattered around the different City Centre neighbourhoods. It made for interesting flaneuring. Calgary does something similar on its electrical boxes.

Hydrostone is charming neighbourhood with tree-lined boulevards and a quaint main street a fun place to flaneur.

Hydrostone is charming neighbourhood with tree-lined boulevards and a quaint main street a fun place to flaneur.

Urban Living 

Secondly, like Calgary, Halifax’s downtown is surrounded by several trendy residential communities each with their own main street, character and new condo buildings.   Spring Garden Road is a bit like Calgary’s Kensington, with its shops, restaurants and cafés along with its own urban park – Halifax Public Gardens, the equivalent of Kensington’s Riley Park.  

Then there’s Halifax’s North End Entertainment District, which has a lot in common with Calgary’s old Electric Avenue – a mix of bars, restaurants and cafes. The Local and Marquee Ballroom are popular live music venues, Propeller Brewing Company serves up some great beers and The Independent Mercantile Co would be right at home in Calgary’s design district. 

Quinpool Road, on the west side of Halifax’s downtown is like Calgary’s 17th Avenue SW in the 70s with its eclectic collection of “mom and pop” shops, many having been around since the 50s and 60s, yet on the cusp of change with numerous new shops opening and new condos in the works.   

Link: Quinpool is Cool

Then there is Halifax’s Hydrostone community, with the look and feel of Calgary’s Britannia Plaza, both feature an upscale one-block long main street of shops and restaurants, as well as a mix of new condos and old single family homes. It was named a Great Neighbourhood by The Canadian Institute of Planners in 2011.

The North End (not to be confused the North End Entertainment District) has much in common with Inglewood, with its mix of old and new shops including an Army & Navy Store that reminded me of Inglewood’s Crown Surplus store. And yes, the North End has craft breweries, a distillery and a cider shop that parallels Inglewood’s growing craft industries.

Spring Garden Road has a lovely mix of shops and architecture.

Spring Garden Road has a lovely mix of shops and architecture.

Halifax’s North End Entertainment District is in transition from a seedy to a funky street.

Halifax’s North End Entertainment District is in transition from a seedy to a funky street.

Agricola Street is Halifax’s hipster street.

Agricola Street is Halifax’s hipster street.

Halifax’s Public Garden is a lovely oasis in the middle of downtown even in late October. The Calgary equivalent is Riley Park.

Halifax’s Public Garden is a lovely oasis in the middle of downtown even in late October. The Calgary equivalent is Riley Park.

Downtown Attractions

Halifax’s Citadel shares much in common with Calgary’s Stampede Grounds/Fort Calgary area, both on the edge of downtown, each representing the historical beginning of their respective cities. While the Citadel sits on a hill overlooking the city and is impressive port, is certainly a more striking landmark than Fort Calgary, our Stampede Grounds are more integrated into the everyday life of its city with concerts, sporting and other events. 

Both cities have major waterfront attractions.  Halifax’s waterfront is home to the Canadian Museum of Immigration Pier 21, Seaport Farmer’s Market, Discovery Center, Cruise Ship Terminal and boardwalk shops.   

Calgary’s riverbanks (Bow & Elbow) are home to the Calgary Zoo, Telus Spark, Saddledome, Stampede Park and various river walks, promenades and pathways and three major parks (Shaw Millennium, Prince’s and St. Patrick Islands).

Halifax even has an iconic, funky new central library that is every bit as popular and spectacular as Calgary’s new central library.  With its at grade entrance and small plaza along Spring Garden Road, it is better integrated to its downtown.  It has two cafes, one at street level and a rooftop café with an outdoor patio that offers spectacular views of the city. Opened in 2014, it has already been the catalyst for two mixed-use developments, with street retail next door.  

The central library similarities don’t stop here. In both cities, the architects were not only chosen through an international design competition, but Scandinavian firms were chosen to work with a local firm.  Halifax chose local firm Fowler Bauld and Mitchell and Schmidt Hammer Lassen of Denmark and Calgary chose local firm DIALOG and Noregian firm Snohetta.  

At the Citadel these boys loved pretending they were soldiers.

At the Citadel these boys loved pretending they were soldiers.

Pier 21 Fun: Loved this installation at Pier 21 where you were invited to decorate your own mini piece of luggage and then hang it on the wall. Another installation was of luggage tags where visitors were invited to write their stories of immigration or thoughts about their Pier 21 experience and hang them on the wall.

Pier 21 Fun: Loved this installation at Pier 21 where you were invited to decorate your own mini piece of luggage and then hang it on the wall. Another installation was of luggage tags where visitors were invited to write their stories of immigration or thoughts about their Pier 21 experience and hang them on the wall.

Halifax’s Farmer’s Market is part of a huge urban renewal project that includes their Science Centre, Nova Scotia School of Art & Design, Pier 21 and Cruise Ship docks. It is the equivalent of Calgary’s East Village redevelopment.

Halifax’s Farmer’s Market is part of a huge urban renewal project that includes their Science Centre, Nova Scotia School of Art & Design, Pier 21 and Cruise Ship docks. It is the equivalent of Calgary’s East Village redevelopment.

Halifax’s new Central Library reminded me of shipping containers being stacked one on top of another, which is a perfect metaphor for the city as it is a major container port.

Halifax’s new Central Library reminded me of shipping containers being stacked one on top of another, which is a perfect metaphor for the city as it is a major container port.

Brenda loved the plum kuchen at the Gingerbread Haus Bakery (1138 Queen Street) so much we went there four times. They have the freshest sandwiches we have tasted in a long time and tasty soups.

Brenda loved the plum kuchen at the Gingerbread Haus Bakery (1138 Queen Street) so much we went there four times. They have the freshest sandwiches we have tasted in a long time and tasty soups.

I had to try the Red Coats pastry.

I had to try the Red Coats pastry.

Is 400,000 a magic number?

The more I wandered around Halifax, the more it had the feeling of Calgary in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s when our downtown was undergoing a mega transformation with construction on every block.  However, there is a big difference, instead of the 8 am to 6 pm weekday-oriented office buildings that dominate our downtown, Halifax is building residential right in the middle of its downtown.  

In addition, all of their urban pedestrian streets – Quinpool, Agricola, Gottingen and Spring Garden all have several new condos recently opened and more in the construction or planning stages on or nearby.  These new residential developments should enhance Halifax’s urban street life in the years to come. 

Everywhere we went in the City Centre, posted City signs notified neighbours of pending new mixed-use residential development applications. It was clear, Calgary isn’t the only place where tearing down 3 or 4 houses to build a new mid-rise condo in their place is happening.

It is interesting to note Calgary’s population in 1971 was just over 400,000 and Halifax’s today is also just over 400,000.  Perhaps there is something that happens when a city reaches the critical mass of 400,000 people that is the catalyst for urban renewal.  

The Halifax Commons is a huge park that has playing fields, a skateboard park and the Emera Oval that in is an ice skating oval in the winter and a roller blading, cycling oval in the summer. It even has FREE rentals for tourists who want to give it a try. The Caglary equivalent would be Shaw Millennium Park.

The Halifax Commons is a huge park that has playing fields, a skateboard park and the Emera Oval that in is an ice skating oval in the winter and a roller blading, cycling oval in the summer. It even has FREE rentals for tourists who want to give it a try. The Caglary equivalent would be Shaw Millennium Park.

Live music in the cafeteria at lunch at St. Mary’s University was a nice touch.

Live music in the cafeteria at lunch at St. Mary’s University was a nice touch.

Every Saturday afternoon Halifax’s Your Father’s Moustache restaurant hosts Joe Murphy and the Water Street Blues Band from 4 to 8 pm. and has been for 25+ years. It reminded us of the Mike Clark band at Calgary’s Mikey’s on 12th or Tim Williams at Blues Can.

Every Saturday afternoon Halifax’s Your Father’s Moustache restaurant hosts Joe Murphy and the Water Street Blues Band from 4 to 8 pm. and has been for 25+ years. It reminded us of the Mike Clark band at Calgary’s Mikey’s on 12th or Tim Williams at Blues Can.

Last Word

There is a definite sense of optimism in the air in Halifax. Posters were plastered on poles everywhere, advertising upcoming concerts, festivals and entertainment, sending a clear message that “things are happening here.”  

We got the feeling Halifax could well become Canada’s next “urban playground” - once they finish their mega makeover.

For more information on Halifax: Discover Halifax

For more information on Calgary: Tourism Calgary

Note: If you want to see photos and information on Calgary’s City Centre see the links below.

If you go:

We stayed a couple of nights at the Cambridges Suites Hotel which is very handy to downtown, Citadel, the waterfront and the Gingerbread Haus Bakery. Very comfy rooms and great breakfast.

We also stayed in a Airbnb on at 6034 Cunard St which was great for exploring the west and north sides of the City Centre - Quinpool and Agricola Streets and a lovely walk to Dalhousie and St. Mary’s universities and the Hydrostone district.

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Calgary: The world’s most walkable city centre!

Calgary’s City Centre: One of the best in North America!

Calgary’s Everyday Tourist’s Off The Beaten path picks.

 

 

Shane Homes Rocky Ridge YMCA Gone Wild?

I promised myself that this summer I would be a tourist in my own city and explore beyond Calgary’s City Centre.  Having heard great things about the new recreation centre in Rocky Ridge and seeing the amazing computer rendering I decide to check it out one day after golf. 

It is literally at the edge of the City.  And it didn't disappoint!

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Futuristic?

It is nestled into the base of a hill, looking like some strange spaceship has landed or a slithering alien creature is about to invade the city.  Its curvaceous shape and rich bronze façade is in sharp contrast to the cheap big box stores facades and the hard edges of the houses, condos and other buildings in the surrounding communities.  

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New Kid On The Block

Move over National Music Centre and the new Central Library there is a new kid in town when it comes to iconic public building architecture.  And it was designed by Calgary’s own GEC architects, not by some international firm.

FYI: GEC also designed the Saddledome one of Calgary other iconic buildings.  

The 284,000 square foot building opened in January 2018 at a cost of $192 million.  The City of Calgary paid for the building and the YMCA is the operator.   Shane Homes paid $3.5 million for naming rights.  It is designed to server the 150,000 people living in the new communities at the northwest edge of the city.  

It is the largest Y in the world, at least for the rest of this year. The   new 333,000 square foot SETON Y is scheduled to open in January 2019. 

 

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Flock by Team of Haddad/Design is one of two public artworks planned for the site.  

Flock by Team of Haddad/Design is one of two public artworks planned for the site.  

Calgary's National Music Centre

Calgary's National Music Centre

Calgary's new central library is the white building on the left. 

Calgary's new central library is the white building on the left. 

Amazing Amenities

  • 25-metre, 8 lane competition pool
  • Spectator viewing area
  • Leisure pool with a wave system and waterslide
  • Hot tubs and steam room
  • 1 multi-purpose ice rink
  • 1 leisure ice surface
  • 3 full gymnasiums with multi-purpose flooring
  • Fitness centre with cardio and strength training equipment
  • Fitness/aerobics studios
  • 160-metre running/walking track
  • Large and small rooms for use as studios, classrooms and meeting spaces
  • 3,000 sq. ft. library with access to print and digital materials, hold pick up, public seating and study space
  • Art making, studio and gallery space
  • 250-seat theatre
  • Childcare/child-minding
  • Food services
  • Physiotherapy/medical clinic
  • Outdoor basketball court
  • Pathways and nature trails/interpretative
  • Outdoor play structures
  • Skateboard park (completion in summer 2018)
  •  
  • Video: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/calgary-rocky-ridge-ymca-1.4517102
The pool gets so busy some days they have to turn people away. 

The pool gets so busy some days they have to turn people away. 

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This is the library which was unmanned when I was there? Interesting open concept and honour system? 

This is the library which was unmanned when I was there? Interesting open concept and honour system? 

Iconic Entrance

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I love how these benches echo the colour and shape of the exterior.  

I love how these benches echo the colour and shape of the exterior.  

Last Word 

Calgary’s love their recreational activities. Shane Homes YMCA @ Rocky Ridge sold 9,700 memberships in its first two weeks.   I was there at about 3 pm on a Wednesday in the middle of Stampede and the place was busy.  I can only imagine how busy it will be in the winter, when there are fewer outdoor options.

This new YCWA is one of four new recreation centers built by the City of Calgary over the past few years, the others being Great Plans (designed by the Calgary’s MTA architecture and Toronto's MJMA), Remington YMCA @ Quarry Park (also designed by GEC) and the futuristic looking SETON YMCA (designed by Calgary’s Gibbs Gage architecture).  

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The total cost of all four recreation centres totalled $480 million. And, yes each came with a public art project, which could be the subject of a future blog.

While Calgarians living in the City Centre are getting a signature library and museum, the suburbs are getting signature recreation centres. All with iconic architecture, no cookie cutter boxes anymore. 

At $675 per square foot, some say it is easy to create an iconic building, the challenge should be to create great architecture with a more modest building. This too could be the subject of a future blog. Stay tuned!

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Urban Design: Does Anybody Really Care?

Calgary's Audacious New Central Library

National Music Museum: The Red Flag

"Trio" & "Fish" / A Missed Opportunity?

Calgary Municipal Land Corporation (CMLC) recently announced “Trio” and “Fish,” by German artist Christian Moeller as the newest additions to its growing public art collection. Both were met with unanimous approval by the 150 or so Calgarians at the unveiling held at the Dutton Theatre (soon be the old Calgary Central Library) and I saw only positive comments on Twitter. In chatting subsequently with several Calgarians everyone seems to like “Trio” and “Fish.”  

Moeller's computer rendering of what the Trio creatures will look like. 

Moeller's computer rendering of what the Trio creatures will look like. 

Once a curator, always a curator!

Having spent 10 years the Executive Director/Curator of the Muttart Public Art Gallery (now Contemporary Calgary) in another life, I look at art projects with perhaps a different eye than most.

I also liked the pieces at first glance, but as Moeller was presenting the background on his two pieces of art, I began to think they are cute more than clever, more playful than provocative.  

I started to ask myself some questions.

  • Doesn’t Calgary already have enough cute, playful public art?
  • Do we need more thought-provoking pieces? 
  • Do we need more interactive and engaging public art?
Does Calgary have too much cute public art? Boney is a nine-foot high purple pooch.  This whimsical piece of art located in SETON, was designed by Inges Idee and has become a welcomed addition to SETON's urban streetscape.  Inge Idee also create the Blue Ring (aka Travelling Light) lamppost that is not well liked. You win some, you lose some?

Does Calgary have too much cute public art? Boney is a nine-foot high purple pooch.  This whimsical piece of art located in SETON, was designed by Inges Idee and has become a welcomed addition to SETON's urban streetscape.  Inge Idee also create the Blue Ring (aka Travelling Light) lamppost that is not well liked. You win some, you lose some?

Best Library In The World?

Then Bill Ptacek, Calgary Public Library’s CEO gave a passionate speech saying his vision is to “create the greatest public library in the world” and how public art is critical to that vision. He was emphatic the new library will have a strong indigenous presence as part of its placemaking.  (Councillor Druh Farrell, in her welcoming comments also made a point of referencing the role of the indigenous people in Calgary’s history.)

The light bulb went on! 

Why instead of an international competition for a public artwork, didn’t CMLC commission one or more indigenous artists to create art for the new library?

I am not aware of any major public artwork in Calgary by an indigenous artist.  A missed opportunity?

In chatting with a few visual art professionals, they wondered why Moeller was commissioned to create art for both the outdoor and indoor sites.  CMCL could have easily conducted an international competition for one of the sites and conducted an invitation competition to Canadian artists with an indigenous background for the other. 

But I digress.

Brian Jungen is an Canadian artist with an indigenous heritage who exhibits internationally. This piece is from an exhibition at the Smithsonian Institute, Washington DC. His work is very thought provoking and visually stunning.

Brian Jungen is an Canadian artist with an indigenous heritage who exhibits internationally. This piece is from an exhibition at the Smithsonian Institute, Washington DC. His work is very thought provoking and visually stunning.

CMLC / Library Update

After posting this, CMLC contacted me to say that Brian Jungen was actually one of the five finalists for the new Central Library commission. Calgary Public Library also commented on Twitter that they have three artists in residences (one dedicated to indigenous art) and Indigenous placemaking within the new library. 

Just by chance I also visited the new Riddell Library and Learning Centre at Mount Royal University.  I was very impressed by its design and the funky studying and learning spaces provided.  But what really caught my attention was that some of the signage was in English and Blackfoot.  I am wondering if Calgary Public Library is thinking that they might do that also.  

Just one of many examples of the use of Blackfoot words at the Riddell Library and Learning Centre at Mount Royal University.

Just one of many examples of the use of Blackfoot words at the Riddell Library and Learning Centre at Mount Royal University.

 

What is "Trio?"

Moeller told the audience “Trio” is three, 10-meter tall cartoonish, alien-like characters inspired by the plastic Dunking Birds (aka Drinking Bird) that bob up and down to mimic the motion of a bird drinking. FYI: The heads and necks of Trio will oscillate back and forth by 25 degrees (20 degrees forward and 5 degrees back). Two of the sculptures will be located at the new Central Library’s west entrance and the other at the east entrance.

CMLC’s news release describes “Trio” as “a band of sisters engaged in an endless back and forth motion. Reminiscent of a cross between a hockey player and a ‘drinking bird,’ they perform a visual dialogue or choreography, rocking their tall upper bodies like an upside-down pendulum swinging through the open sky.”

The science behind the drinking bird dates back to Germany in the 1760s. More info:    Drinking Bird

The science behind the drinking bird dates back to Germany in the 1760s. More info: Drinking Bird

Street view of Trio (duo) at the west entrance to the new Central Library. (Photo credit: CMLC)

Street view of Trio (duo) at the west entrance to the new Central Library. (Photo credit: CMLC)

Street view of Trio (solo) at the east entrance to the new Central Library. (Photo credit: CMLC)

Street view of Trio (solo) at the east entrance to the new Central Library. (Photo credit: CMLC)

What is “Fish?”

Moeller’s second commissioned a huge artwork (45 ft. by 10 ft.) is made up of approximately 10,000 “books.” Well they are not actual books, as they don’t have titles, authors or writing in them.  The artist had the blank looks custom manufactured in 12 different coloured spines. Each quasi-book is strategically placed to create a pixelated close-up of the head of a huge reddish-orange fish staring back at you.   

I wonder if this work is a comment on the meaninglessness of books in our digital world and the changing role of libraries.  I also wondered if the artist considered adding an interactive element – for example, allowing people to take out the books, write in them and return them.

The Fish, located on the far wall in the cafe area of the Calgary's new Central Library.

The Fish, located on the far wall in the cafe area of the Calgary's new Central Library.

The Selection Process

CMLC went to great effort to explain the comprehensive process involved in selecting Moeller for this commission – one that began with a “Request for Qualifications” from local, national and international artists, back in 2014.  This created a list of 239 artists, which was narrowed to 35 by a Volunteer Art Committee comprising of representatives from the community-at-large, ACAD, Glenbow, Calgary Public Library, Calgary Arts Development and an artist. 

Five artists were then chosen by the Committee to meet with the New Calgary Library (NCL) project team; Library staff and a local historian so they could better understand the NCL vision and Calgary’s sense of place. The five artists then developed their concepts and presented to the Committee. Moeller was ultimately chosen for the $2 million public art commission, a sum which is inclusive of all fees, expenses, fabrication, delivery and installation costs. 

CMLC is an arms length organization of the City and as such, is not bound by the City of Calgary’s Public Art Policy. However, they have always conducted a very professional and fair selection process for their public art, with the result being artworks enjoyed by the majority of Calgarians.

Cute? Clever? Captivating?

Susan Veres, senior vice president of strategy & business development describes the new public art as “a colourful, captivating concept that brings a playfulness to the library experience – a delightful sense of arrival and wonder for all visitors to enjoy, especially children.”

Moeller’s playful pieces will compliment CMLC’s existing permanent public art in East Village, which are also colourful and playful.

  • Ron Moppett’s “THESAMEWAYBETTER/READER,” a colourful and delightful mosaic of 956,321 (no I didn’t count them) colourful tiny glass tiles (made in Germany) reflecting Calgary’s history. 
  • Julian Opie’s “Promenade,” which features several cartoon figures on an LED screen representing everyday Calgarians, as they stroll in endless circles around what looks like a mini downtown office tower. Ironically the piece is more accessible to those driving over the 5th Avenue flyover than to pedestrians on the street.
  • Michel de Broin’s “Bloom” which is made up of retro streetlights arranged to look like a giant flower located in St. Patrick’s Island on the banks of the Bow River.
Ron Moppett’s “THESAMEWAYBETTER/READER,”in East Village.

Ron Moppett’s “THESAMEWAYBETTER/READER,”in East Village.

As well, “Trio” and “Fish” will also fit nicely with Calgary’s other fun, funky and quirky downtown public art – Plensa’s “Wonderland,” a big white wire mesh head, the tall skinny naked dancing figures titled “Brotherhood of Man” by Mario Armengol, Sorel Etrog’s aliens, Sadko and Kabuki, as well as the folk art cows in the Centennial Parkade’s +15 Udderly Art Pasture.

Sadko and Kabuki on the street on the southwest corner of Bow Valley Square. 

Sadko and Kabuki on the street on the southwest corner of Bow Valley Square. 

Backstory

This is not the first time Moeller has been short-listed for a public art commission in Calgary.  Back in 2014, I was a juror for a public art piece to be commission for the Crowfoot LRT Station. One of the submissions was Moeller’s.  Ironically, his proposal was my choice for the site, but all the other jurors voted for Bill Pechet’s tree-like lampposts with yellow warning lights “leaves.” Not a bad choice, I just liked Moeller’s better.

I was surprised to see a version of Moeller’s Calgary’s proposal installed in the middle of a traffic circle in downtown Nashville this past October. I loved the piece, but the location wasn’t appropriate - the public couldn’t get up close to the 35 cedar poles, each 85 feet tall, that looks like a game of pick-up sticks with references to First Nation tent poles.  What I liked about Moeller “Stix” piece was I imagined kids at the LRT Station running around the poles playing tag and hide-and-seek. This could not happen at the Nashville traffic circle!

Moeller's "Stix" installation in Nashville. Public art needs to be in public spaces!

Moeller's "Stix" installation in Nashville. Public art needs to be in public spaces!

"Roger That" artwork at Crowfoot LRT Station by Bill Pichet. 

"Roger That" artwork at Crowfoot LRT Station by Bill Pichet. 

Chicago Envy

I am still envious of Chicago’s Millennium Park and its two iconic public artworks – Cloud Gate (by Anish Kapoor ) and Crown Fountain (by Jaume Plensa).  Both attract thousands of people daily to come, stay and interact with them. They are destinations in themselves, not just something to glance at and move on. 

However with a price tag of $23 million for Cloud Gate and $17 million for Crown Fountain, I expect I won’t see a work of art on this scale and scope in Calgary in my lifetime.  But we do have two special pedestrian bridges with similar price tags - the Peace Bridge at Prince’s Island and George King Bridge at St. Patricks’ Island.

Link: Putting the PUBLIC back into PUBLICart!

Crown Fountain in Chicago's Millennium Park attracts thousands of people of all ages to sit, play and splash. 

Crown Fountain in Chicago's Millennium Park attracts thousands of people of all ages to sit, play and splash. 

George King bridge links East Village to St. Patrick's Island and Memorial Drive is like a work of art.

George King bridge links East Village to St. Patrick's Island and Memorial Drive is like a work of art.

Last Word

I expect Moeller’s “Trio” and “Fish” will be loved by Calgarians.  While some will complain about the $2 million budget and some will complain “why wasn’t a Calgary or Canadian artist selected?” I think that will always happen.  You can’t make everyone happy and than includes me!

However, I do think we missed an opportunity to do something special by not working with Canada’s indigenous visual arts community to create a monumental work of art. 

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