Calgary: Parades Celebrate Cowtown’s Cosmopolitan Culture 

As the saying goes….everyone loves a parade! In Calgary’s case, “everyone” reflects the City’s evolution from being the bastion of Western Canada’s corporate, cowboy conservative culture into Canada’s third most ethnically diverse city.  The city boasts four major annual parades, each celebrating an element of the city’s growing heterogeneity – Stampede, Pride, Nagar Kirtan and Parade of Wonders. It’s spectrum of parades exemplifies Calgary’s dramatic cultural transformation over the past 30 years - from a frontier town to a cosmopolitan city.  

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Calgary is no longer a “one horse town.”

Stampede Parade

When I moved to Calgary in the early ‘80s, the Calgary Stampede and its parade was the only game in town.  The parade is a popular as ever. About 350,000 people come to celebrate Calgary’s rich agricultural, ranching and indigenous cultures each year. It is still Calgary’s premier parade with 116 entries, 32 floats, and 12 marching bands involving 4,000 people and 750 horses travelling along its 4.5 km route through the downtown. 

The Stampede Parade is a celebration of Calgary’s pioneer spirit. 

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Calgary Pride Parade

This year’s Calgary’s Pride Parade took place on the Sunday of the Labour Day weekend, attracting an estimated 80,000 spectators along its 2 km downtown route. The 190 colourful entries included “everyone” from politicians to LBGT groups, from financial institutions to law firms and from kids to dogs.  It is no longer an underground protest march, but a celebration of the city’s diversity.

From its humble beginning in 1990 when a about 100 people many wearing paper bags over their heads or Lone Ranger masks (to disguise their identity in case family, friends or employers might recognize them) protested for gay rights, it has become the City’s fastest growing parade. It became mainstream in 2011 when Mayor Naheed Nenshi was parade marshal and corporations like the Calgary Flames started sponsoring floats.

Calgary’s Pride Parade signifies the city’s growing openness to people of all orientations. 

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Nagar Kirtan Parade

The Nagar Kirtan Parade, organized each May by the Dashmesh Culture Centre happens each May in the northeast community of Martindale. The annual parade is held in celebration of Vaisakhi, one of the most significant holidays in the Sikh calendar. Nagar Kirtan refers to the procession of the Sikh Congregation through the town singing holy hymns. Calgary’s Nagar Kirtan parade featuring lots of singing and floats, invites “everyone” to watch or participate. It attracted of 60,000 spectators in 2018. 

Calgary is not only home to the third largest Sikh community in Canada, but is home to people of 240 different ethnic origins. 

This parade is a celebration of “equality, freedom and justice for all.”

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POW (Parade of Wonders) Parade

POW is part of Calgary Comic and Entertainment Expo, a cosplay festival that takes place every spring in celebration of pop-culture, fantasy and imagination. The parade, introduced into the Expo’s calendar of events in 2013, attracted over 4,000 participants in 2018. All parade participants – of all ages and backgrounds - must dress up as their favourite character from movies, TV shows, comics, video games or books.  

The 2-km parade winds its way through the downtown from Eau Claire Market to Olympic Plaza at noon on the Friday of Calgary Expo. It attracted over 15,000 spectators from infants to grandparents, many of whom also dressed up as their favourite fantasy character.  It is a riot of colour and the biggest smiles you will ever see.

POW is a celebration of Calgary as a creative, fun and imaginative city. 

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Last Word

Cowtown, as Calgary used to be referred to, is no longer the redneck city that some thought it was (and some still think it is).  And though, it still has its roots in the pragmatic, pioneer prairie conservatism, its branches are full of leaves of different shapes, sizes and colours.  

Every city has it flaws, but over the past 30+ years, Calgary has evolved from a singular small-town sensibility into a diverse cosmopolitan urban playground that “everyone” can enjoy.  Our parades are a testament to that. 

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Everyday Tourist Does Calgary Expo

Colourful Stampede Postcards

Calgary's 2018 Festival Fun

Kensington: Calgary's "Left Bank" is trés cool.

When it comes to cool communities in North America, Calgary’s Kensington Village has to be near the top.  It truly is a village in the middle of the city with its two main streets 10th St NW and Kensington Road NW (most communities are lucky to have one) surrounded, until recently, by mostly single-family homes in the historic communities of Hillhurst and Sunnyside.

  10th Street NW has a great mix of shops, pubs, cafes and restaurants.  It even has two grocery stores. 

10th Street NW has a great mix of shops, pubs, cafes and restaurants.  It even has two grocery stores. 

  Kensington Road also has a great mix of retail, restaurants, cafes, patios and pubs.

Kensington Road also has a great mix of retail, restaurants, cafes, patios and pubs.

  Sunnyside's residential streets still have the look of   an early 20th century prairie town. 

Sunnyside's residential streets still have the look of an early 20th century prairie town. 

Mega Makeover

Today, Kensington’s mega-makeover means it is evolving from a quaint, early 20th century village to a bustling 21st century urban village with the addition of several low and mid-rise condos, as well as numerous infill houses. 

Kensington is where professionals, empty nesters and students (ACAD, SAIT and University of Calgary) mingle.  From coffee to curling, from cricket to cupcakes, from flea market to farmers’ market, Kensington is trés cool.  

It is Calgary’s Left Bank!

(FYI: The term “left bank” references Paris’ bohemian district on the left side of the Seine River as it flows through that city).

  Two new condo developments by Battisella Developments have dramatically changed the look of 10th St. NW.

Two new condo developments by Battisella Developments have dramatically changed the look of 10th St. NW.

  Small, older homes are being replaced by mid-rise condos like Ezra on Riley Park, along all major corridors in Kensington.

Small, older homes are being replaced by mid-rise condos like Ezra on Riley Park, along all major corridors in Kensington.

  Hundreds of new infill homes are attracting families to live Kensington. 

Hundreds of new infill homes are attracting families to live Kensington. 

Festivals/Events

Each year, volunteers transform an unused grassy knoll next to Memorial Drive just west of the Centre Street Bridge into a field of crosses to celebrate Remembrance Day.  Even when driving by the Field of Crosses is truly a sobering and thought-provoking experience.

Hillhurst/Sunnyside Community Centre is home to numerous events year-round from rummage sales to a long-standing Sunday Flea Market. 

Recently, it hosted Calgary’s Seedy Saturday event - a huge hit with gardeners across the city.   It is also home to a weekly farmers’ market in the summer.

  Each year, Kensington hosts the Field of Crosses.

Each year, Kensington hosts the Field of Crosses.

  The Hillhurst Sunnyside Community Association building is used for a variety of events year round including the popular Sunday Flea Market . 

The Hillhurst Sunnyside Community Association building is used for a variety of events year round including the popular Sunday Flea Market

Shops

One of the most attractive things about Kensington is its abundance of independent boutique shops like Livingston Cavill Extraordinary Toys.

Owned and operated by two experienced museum professionals, it is part toy museum / part toy store. Definitely one-of-a-kind.

  Livingston Cavill Toys is packed with replica vintage toys and games, as well as modern ones. It is definite "must see, must buy" place.

Livingston Cavill Toys is packed with replica vintage toys and games, as well as modern ones. It is definite "must see, must buy" place.

As is Hillhurst Hardware whose motto is “building Calgary since 1945.” This tiny hardware store at 134 - 10th St NW packs a lot of tools and hardware into a tiny space.  Speaking of tiny spaces, Sunnyside Art Supplies next door stocks everything needed to become the next Picasso or Rembrandt.  Kensington is also home to Pages Books on Kensington, Calgary’s best independent bookstore. 

  Sunnyside Art Supply is a quaint shop full of art supplies for budding and established artists. It has been serving Calgary's art community for over 50 years.

Sunnyside Art Supply is a quaint shop full of art supplies for budding and established artists. It has been serving Calgary's art community for over 50 years.

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  Hillhurst Hardware is packed with all the toys a serious handyman might need.  

Hillhurst Hardware is packed with all the toys a serious handyman might need.  

Kensington’s hippy past lives on at the corner of Kensington Road and 14th St SW where you will find Birkenstock Sandals and Futons for Less shops, located in two old houses.

Today, Kensington is home to two bike shops - Ridley’s Cycle and Lifesport (located in an old church) – keeping the bikesters happy.

Framed on Fifth is a hidden gem with exhibitions showcasing local artists, as well as a profession frame shop all packed into a tiny house. Yes, it is on 5th Ave NW (between 11A and 12th Streets NW).  Next door is Pushing Petals, a funky neighbourhood florist. Sit on the bench outside these two shops and enjoy free Wi-Fi.

  The Lifesport located in a 100+ year old church is not only a great bike shop, but it also carries disc golf and cross-country ski equipment.

The Lifesport located in a 100+ year old church is not only a great bike shop, but it also carries disc golf and cross-country ski equipment.

  Healthy urban villages always have a few older houses that have been converted to retail and restaurants.

Healthy urban villages always have a few older houses that have been converted to retail and restaurants.

  I love the shop windows along Kensington Road and 10th St NW.  How cool is this window?

I love the shop windows along Kensington Road and 10th St NW.  How cool is this window?

Coffeehouses

Kensington had a vibrant coffee culture long before the Starbucks invasion in the 90s.  Higher Ground have been around forever as has The Roasterie (which, as you might imagine, still roasts its own beans on site.)

There are several new kids on the block with Vendome perhaps providing the coolest experience given its turn-of-the-century building in the middle of quaint Sunnyside and across the street from Container Park.

  The Roasterie's walls are full of fun coffee artifacts.  You can often smell the Roasterie before you see it.

The Roasterie's walls are full of fun coffee artifacts.  You can often smell the Roasterie before you see it.

  Higher Ground is popular with the artsy crowd is directly across the street from The Plaza theatre. 

Higher Ground is popular with the artsy crowd is directly across the street from The Plaza theatre. 

  Vendome offers a bit of the Parisan coffee house/bakery experience.

Vendome offers a bit of the Parisan coffee house/bakery experience.

Restaurants

Kensington is blessed with a plethora of restaurants - from the iconic Chicken on the Way to the newcomers like Cotto Italian Comfort Food and Oxbow in the uber cool Kensington Riverside Inn.  For Sunday brunch Vero Bistro Moderne is very popular and for Alberta beef, you can’t beat Modern Steak.

Kensington has one of Calgary’s signature pizza parlours too – Pulcinella’s. A member of the exclusive Associazione Pizzaioli Napolitani, it is almost like having the Pope bless your pizza!

  Kennsington Inn home to the Oxbow restaurant is just across the street from the Bow River and a block from the intersection of Kensington Road and 10th St. SW. It is a popular tourist spot, sometimes even celebrities when they are in town.

Kennsington Inn home to the Oxbow restaurant is just across the street from the Bow River and a block from the intersection of Kensington Road and 10th St. SW. It is a popular tourist spot, sometimes even celebrities when they are in town.

  You can't miss Chicken on the Way!

You can't miss Chicken on the Way!

    Pulcinella 's  custom pizza oven is designed especially for their Napolitana pizza.

Pulcinella's custom pizza oven is designed especially for their Napolitana pizza.

  How cool is   Flipp'n Burgers   back alley picnic area? 

How cool is Flipp'n Burgers back alley picnic area? 

    Sunnyside Natural Market   and   Sidewalk Citizen Bakery   share space in a very synergistic manner. 

Sunnyside Natural Market and Sidewalk Citizen Bakery share space in a very synergistic manner. 

Art/Architecture

  This is the cool entrance to Pixel condo.  

This is the cool entrance to Pixel condo.  

Kensington is home to Calgary’s fledgling street art culture.  Wander the alley behind the shops on the east side of 10th Avenue NW to find a street art gallery. 

The Pixel condo with its funky bright yellow cube balconies and neon-coloured entrance has the village’s most contemporary architecture. 

Kensington is also home to several historical buildings including the Hillhurst United Church (1907), St. Barnabas Anglican Church (1906) and the lovely St. John’s elementary school (1916) and the majestic sandstone Hillhurst School (1912).

Wander Kensington’s residential streets and you are sure to find some of the many “Free Little Libraries,” that are often fun folk art pieces.

  On the side of the Hillhurst Sunnyside Community Association Building is a mural that has this young girl giving the "finger' to Pierre Trudeau.  Backstory: Back in 1982, then Prime Minister of Canada, Trudeau flipped the finger to protesters in Salmon Arm BC. It soon became known as the "Trudeau Salute." I am thinking many Calgarians would love to flip the finger these days to his son, Justin, who is now the Prime Minister. 

On the side of the Hillhurst Sunnyside Community Association Building is a mural that has this young girl giving the "finger' to Pierre Trudeau.  Backstory: Back in 1982, then Prime Minister of Canada, Trudeau flipped the finger to protesters in Salmon Arm BC. It soon became known as the "Trudeau Salute." I am thinking many Calgarians would love to flip the finger these days to his son, Justin, who is now the Prime Minister. 

  Kensington's Street Art Gallery is located on the east side of 10th Street NW. 

Kensington's Street Art Gallery is located on the east side of 10th Street NW. 

  Pixel is an example of the contemporary architecture that is changing ambience of Kensington. 

Pixel is an example of the contemporary architecture that is changing ambience of Kensington. 

  Ezra on Riley Park is also helping to create a new sense of place for Kensington Village.

Ezra on Riley Park is also helping to create a new sense of place for Kensington Village.

  Pointe takes advantage of its triangular site to create a flatiron building. 

Pointe takes advantage of its triangular site to create a flatiron building. 

  Rumour has it the Hillhurst United Church pastor is considering converting their under-utlized gym into a micro-brewery. 

Rumour has it the Hillhurst United Church pastor is considering converting their under-utlized gym into a micro-brewery. 

Parks/Plazas/Pathways

In 1904, the Riley Family donated 8 hectares from their 146,000-hectare Cochrane Ranch to create Riley Park (north of 5th Avenue from 10th to 13th Streets NW).  It boasts one of the oldest cricket grounds in North America, a lovely children’s wading pool and the Senator Patrick Burns Memorial Rock Garden.  (FYI: The rock garden was created using 20,000 pieces of flagstone from Senator Patrick Burns’ mansion.)

Poppy Plaza, located at the corner of 10th St and Memorial Drive pays homage to Calgary and Canada’s war and peacekeeping efforts. It is a great place to enjoy the vista of the downtown skyline, the shimmering water of the Bow River and people walking, cycling, skateboarding and roller blading along the Bow River pathway.  You may even spot a fisherman.

  How cool is this fisherman, dressed up in a suit fishing on the shore of the Bow River at the Louise Bridge, that connects Kensington to downtown

How cool is this fisherman, dressed up in a suit fishing on the shore of the Bow River at the Louise Bridge, that connects Kensington to downtown

  Poppy Plaza provides interesting perspectives of the downtown skyline.

Poppy Plaza provides interesting perspectives of the downtown skyline.

 Kensington's Riley Park wading pool is a fun place for young families to hang out.  

Kensington's Riley Park wading pool is a fun place for young families to hang out.  

  containR Park is a multi-use space, that is popular with locals as a place to meet and popular with photographers wanting to do fashion shoots. 

containR Park is a multi-use space, that is popular with locals as a place to meet and popular with photographers wanting to do fashion shoots. 

Fitness/Recreation

In addition to the Riley Park cricket matches, Kensington is also home to the historic Calgary Curling Club (established in 1888, it moved to its current location 1953) and Bow Valley Lawn Bowling Club (1932). 

It is also home to several modern fitness clubs - Bodhi Tree Yoga Studio, 10th Street Boxing Gym, Orangetheory Fitness Studio, and Urban Fitness Studio to name a few.

  Practicing for a Sunday cricket match in Riley Park. 

Practicing for a Sunday cricket match in Riley Park. 

  Lawn bowling is more recreational fun than a sport. 

Lawn bowling is more recreational fun than a sport. 

Culture/Nightlife

The Plaza Theatre has been curating and showing indie films for over 40 years.  No reclining cushy seats here, just thought-provoking movies and respectful audiences.  There are lots of places to go before or after to eat, drink and debate current issues and the meaning of life. 

Jubilee Theatre may not technically be within Kensington boundaries but it is on the border and offers Kensingtonians easy access to everything from Broadway shows to ballet performances.  

  The Plaza is the "King" of Kensington.

The Plaza is the "King" of Kensington.

Pubs/Beer/Spirits

During Calgary’s pre-World War 1 boom, Kensington developed as a working-class, largely Anglo-Saxon suburb - hence the British street names. It is home to one of Calgary’s best neighbourhood pub appropriately named “The Kensington Pub.”  In 1983, the pub was created by combining the 1911 brick veneer residence of developer John Smith with the 62-year old duplex next door.

The Oak Tree Tavern, popular with the younger crowd, offers up “All You Can Eat Hot Dog Tuesdays,” as well as, comedy nights and live music.

For 26 years, Kensington Wine Market has offered a great selection of curated wines, beers and scotches.  Their popular Saturday afternoon samplings make browsing the shelves too much fun. They also have one of the best seminar and tasting programs in the city.

  Kensington Pub (upper right) fits right into the Kensington streetscape.

Kensington Pub (upper right) fits right into the Kensington streetscape.

  Kensington Wine Market block oozes bohemian charm. 

Kensington Wine Market block oozes bohemian charm. 

  The Oak Tree Tavern welcomes thirty pedestrians to drop in for a beverage. The patio offers great views of the downtown skyline.

The Oak Tree Tavern welcomes thirty pedestrians to drop in for a beverage. The patio offers great views of the downtown skyline.

  The Container Bar (summer only) is literally a container placed in a side alley along Kensington Road that serves as a bar with a few tables.

The Container Bar (summer only) is literally a container placed in a side alley along Kensington Road that serves as a bar with a few tables.

Fun/Funky/Quirky (FFQ) Factor

It doesn’t get much quirkier than The Plaza Theatre, originally built in the 1920s as an automobile garage, then in 1935, converted into a neighbourhood theatre, before evolving in 1970s into Calgary’s first arthouse cinema.  

Alpine Shoe Service is a walk back in time, when people fixed things rather than throwing out anything broken or worn out.  It’s small, easy-to-miss display case next to the entrance has ever-changing, thought-provoking quotes.

  "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." Thomas Edison.

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." Thomas Edison.

 How quirky is an outdoor shoe-shine station?

How quirky is an outdoor shoe-shine station?

  Kensington is also home to a cat cafe. How fun is that?

Kensington is also home to a cat cafe. How fun is that?

  Funky art can pop-up anywhere, anytime in Kensington - those crazy art students!

Funky art can pop-up anywhere, anytime in Kensington - those crazy art students!

  If you walk a block west of 14th St NW along Kensington Road you might stumble upon these solar panels designed to look like a funky flower. 

If you walk a block west of 14th St NW along Kensington Road you might stumble upon these solar panels designed to look like a funky flower. 

 The "rainbow" underpass epitomizes the essence of Kensington's sense of place.

The "rainbow" underpass epitomizes the essence of Kensington's sense of place.

Gated Community?

While people in Hillhurst don’t think of themselves as living in a gated community, in fact there are several streets with decorative gates that not only keep cars from cutting through the residential streets, but also evoke a sense of being a private street.   The gates serve as historical reference as they have the original names of the streets, before Calgary converted to numerical street names in 1904.

  While some might see these gates as charming, others might see them as pretentious.

While some might see these gates as charming, others might see them as pretentious.

Jane loves Kensington

I can’t help but think the late great urban guru Jane Jacobs would approve of how Calgary’s Left Bank (aka Hillhurst/Sunnyside, aka Kensington) is evolving with its mixture of old, new and middle age; human-scale commercial buildings housing mostly independent enterprises.

She would also approve of the diversity of housing stock – everything from cottage homes to co-op housing, to low and mid-rise condo buildings. 

NO high-rises along Calgary’s “Left Bank.”

Note: This is the fourth in a series of blogs examining what makes Calgary’s City Centre neighbourhoods so cool.  The others are Inglewood, Beltline and Downtown. 

If you like this blog, you will like these links: 

Kensington: One of North America's Healthiest Urban Villages

Calgary: Field of Crosses

A Sunday Walkabout In Hillhurst

Stampede Park 2025

During the 2017 Stanley Cup playoffs, Nashville received a lot of attention for how its downtown came alive on game days as the Predators strived to win the Cup. On game nights, tens of thousands of fans who didn’t have game tickets flooded their downtown to watch the game on huge screens outside the arena. 

Nashville’s arena and the next door convention centre were thought by some to be the model for what a new arena and expanded convention centre could do for Calgary’s Stampede Park and City Centre.  

I had to see this for myself, so I planned to be in Nashville for the opening home game of the Predators’ 2017/18 season.

Note: An edited version of this blog was published in the Calgary Herald (New Condos section), titled, "Nashville is wrong model for reviving Stampede Park" on Feb, 3, 2018. 

  Bridgestone Arena plaza that open up to Lower Broadway is empty most of the time even though it is also home to Nashville Tourist Information Centre. 

Bridgestone Arena plaza that open up to Lower Broadway is empty most of the time even though it is also home to Nashville Tourist Information Centre. 

What I found

I spent 12 days in Nashville, wandering the area around the arena and convention centre almost every day. 

What I found was the streets next to the arena and convention centre were dead except on game days.

  Gold Walk, Nashville Predator hockey players

Gold Walk, Nashville Predator hockey players

Only once did I find the arena plaza animated and that was for the annual “Gold Walk.” That’s when, before the first home game of the season, at around 4 pm the Predator players walk into the arena along a gold-coloured carpet.

Lined with fans and cheerleaders, it’s a bit like how football players enter the stadium before a game.  Though, it seemed a bit hokey to me, the few hundred Nashvillans in attendance clearly enjoyed it.

But, on opening game night, it was not hockey but the 50th anniversary celebration of the nearby Tootsie’s Orchard Lounge that drew thousands of people to the street outside the arena.  The block of Lower Broadway - across from the arena - was closed for an all night outdoor concert with free live music by the likes of Alberta’s own Terri Clark.

  There was no street animation at any time on three sides of the arena that are blank walls to the street. 

There was no street animation at any time on three sides of the arena that are blank walls to the street. 

For the entire 12 days, the cavernous 2-block long convention centre was empty, or at least it appeared so from the street. I did go in several times but nothing significant was happening and it certainly did nothing to create street vitality.

The Bridgestone all-purpose arena was built in 1996. However, only now, 20 years later are new private sector developments happening around it – Bridgestone and Pinnacle office towers, a mixed-use building (including the National Museum of African American Music) under construction, as well as numerous hotels.  

It is the new convention centre, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum and the growing popularity of the live music experience along Lower Broadway that are the real catalysts for new downtown developments like the impressive Omni hotel.

Nashville’s main street, Lower Broadway is a gritty street lined with of loud honky-tonk bars that offer free (no cover charge) live music from 10 am to 3 am. The bands play at the front the bars with the windows open so you can hear the music and see the musicians as you stroll along.  Think of it as one long street party 365 days of the year. 

Over the past decade or so, Nashville has done a good job of revitalizing its downtown by making it a major tourist attraction.  The key to the revitalization is the free music 365 days of the year (similar to Las Vegas’ gambling and shows). Note: The NISSAN stadium, home of the NFL Titans, is across the river from downtown sits vacant most of the time. Opened in 1999, to date there has been no other development around it. That should be a “red flag” to anyone thinking a downtown stadium is an automatic catalyst for other developments.

  The new convention centre looked lovely, but I never saw anyone use this patio during our 12 days stay, not did I see the centre full of people at any time.

The new convention centre looked lovely, but I never saw anyone use this patio during our 12 days stay, not did I see the centre full of people at any time.

Lessons Learned

As Calgary contemplates the development of an expanded BMO Centre and new arena at Stampede/Victoria Park, we need to be realistic with our expectations. Calgary’s ability to become a mega urban tourist attraction is limited by our accessibility to major tourist markets.  For example, there are 12 million people within a 2.5 hr. drive of Nashville and 250 million within a 2-hour flight. In comparison, Calgary has but a small fraction of that – one million within a 2.5 hr. drive and maybe 15 million within a 2.5-hour flight.

Our weather is also a factor.  In North America, the peak convention and trade show months are from September to June, which for Calgary means cool if not downright cold weather.  In Nashville, even in mid October it was warm enough for shorts - daytime and evenings.

And to be brutally honest, Calgary also lacks a unique sense of place or history essential to becoming a year-round urban tourist attraction.  Nashville is well known internationally as the birthplace of country music, which it has capitalized on to become a year-round music destination. Unfortunately, the Calgary Stampede, a 10-day event, doesn’t allow for a year-round tourist experience.

If Calgary is serious about becoming a tourist city, albeit not on the scale of Nashville, we need to transform Stampede Park into vibrant Sports Hospitality Entertainment District (SHED) for locals first and then tourists.

  Stampede Park has been trying to expand for over 20 years.  Will a new arena and expansion of the BMO Centre be the catalyst to create a vibrant year-round sports, entertainment, hospitality district (SHED)?

Stampede Park has been trying to expand for over 20 years.  Will a new arena and expansion of the BMO Centre be the catalyst to create a vibrant year-round sports, entertainment, hospitality district (SHED)?

  Does it really make sense to spend $500M+ to build a new arena just a block away that will have less seats for public and more seats for corporate fans?

Does it really make sense to spend $500M+ to build a new arena just a block away that will have less seats for public and more seats for corporate fans?

What is needed?

  • Expand the BMO Centre and repurpose the downtown Calgary TELUS Convention Center. We can’t afford to market and manage two similar facilities.
  • Create a vibrant Main Street (live music venues, pubs, restaurants, cinemas, cafes, shops) along 4th Street SE linking East Village, Victoria Park and Stampede Park. 
  • Build a new arena or an upgraded Saddledome and manage it as a major entertainment/events facility not just a sports centre.
  • Build a Stampede Museum/IMAX where tourists and visiting family and friends can enjoy the history and “spills and thrills” of the Stampede experience year-round.
  • Open up Stampede Park along Mcleod Trail so passers-by can see into the park. 
  • Open up the 17th Avenue entrance to vehicular traffic.
  • Remove guard huts at the entrances to allow free flowing traffic through the park 24/7
  The next evolution of Stampede Park will be from restricted gated-community to an open community where people are free to walk, cycle and drive through like any other community in Calgary. 

The next evolution of Stampede Park will be from restricted gated-community to an open community where people are free to walk, cycle and drive through like any other community in Calgary. 

Stampede Park: A place to live?

Given Calgary doesn’t have access to a large tourist market, the key to a vibrant Stampede Park SHED will be to surround it with thousands of condos that are attractive and affordable to Calgarians of all ages and means. 

Stampede Park must become the front yard, back yard and outdoor living room for thousands of Calgarians living in East Village, Victoria Park, Erlton, Inglewood and Ramsay.  It must become a year-round urban playground.

We need residential projects like Lamb’s The Orchard (485 units), Anthem’s Crosstown (874 units + grocery store) at Erlton Station and Cidex’s HAT@Elbow River (1,200 units) on the Elbow River Casino site to happen sooner rather than later.

  Anthem Properties has plans to build four condo towers next to Stampede Park and the Erlton LRT station in the future.  Stampede Park would be their playground. 

Anthem Properties has plans to build four condo towers next to Stampede Park and the Erlton LRT station in the future.  Stampede Park would be their playground. 

  Lamb Corporation has plans for two towers along 11th Avenue and 5th St SE. 

Lamb Corporation has plans for two towers along 11th Avenue and 5th St SE. 

  This is a conceptual plan developed by Sturgess Architects for the redevelopment of the land next to Erlton Station with the Anthem towers included.

This is a conceptual plan developed by Sturgess Architects for the redevelopment of the land next to Erlton Station with the Anthem towers included.

  Remington Developments owns the land south of the CPR tracks that was at one time earmarked for the mega Railtown development that would have included office, condos, shops, LRT and high speed train station.  

Remington Developments owns the land south of the CPR tracks that was at one time earmarked for the mega Railtown development that would have included office, condos, shops, LRT and high speed train station.  

Last Word

Calgary will be hosting 25,000 International Rotarian Convention attendees in 2025.  What a great opportunity to showcase Calgary’s new 21st century Stampede Park as a year-round tourist destination to the delegates.

There’s no time to waste. The Stampede Board, Mayor, Council, Calgary Municipal Land Corporation and Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation must begin working quickly to develop an exciting share vision for Stampede Park.

We MUST work together if we want to make our city a major year-round tourist attraction.

Richard White can be reached at rwhiteyyc@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter @everydaytourist

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Linking East Village & Stampede Park: The Next Step

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Flamesville vs Stampede Park

 

 

 

Calgary's 2018 Festival Fun For Everyone!

Cities are often defined by their signature festivals - Edinburgh and Edmonton by their Fringe Festivals, Montreal by its Jazz and Comedy Festivals, New Orleans by Mardi Gras, Quebec City by Winter Carnival and Rio de Janerio by Carnival.

Similarly, Calgary is known internationally as the Stampede City, the result of the 100+ year old Calgary Stampede. However, over the past few decades Calgary has become more than just the Stampede. Spruce Meadows has made Calgary the show jumping capital of North America. Beakerhead celebrates Calgary’s emergence as an international engineering and science hub. And SLED Island reflects Calgary’s evolution as a budding new music city.

For anyone considering a visit Calgary in 2018, here is the line-up the City’s major festivals - something for almost everyone!

High Performance Rodeo, Jan 3 to 28

In 1987, Calgary’s One Yellow Rabbit collective of artists produced the “Secret Elevator Experimental Performance Festival,” renamed the following year as the “High Performance Rodeo.” Over the past 30+ years it has evolved into one of North America’s best contemporary art festivals, featuring local and international theatre, music, dance and visual arts, a true multidisciplinary celebration of the arts.  This year it offers up 23 sizzling shows, 153 performances at 15 different venues.

Link: High Performance Rodeo

  Friends highly recommend the 10-minute play festival, they have attended every year for the past 20+ years.

Friends highly recommend the 10-minute play festival, they have attended every year for the past 20+ years.

Big Taste, Mar 2 to 11

Foodies won’t want to miss the Big Taste where 80+ restaurants in City Centre offer special 3-course fix price menus for lunch and dinner.  There is even a Gourmet Big Taste 5-course dinner for $65. The Big Taste is Canada’s oldest restaurant festival and offers a chance to experience Calgary’s contemporary dining scene – Cotto, Pad Thai, Foreign Concept, Yellow Door, Pigeonhole, Bar Vonder Fels, Charbar, Model Milk, need I go on.

Link: Big Taste

IMG_9441.jpg

Calgary Performing Arts Festival, April 23 to May 13

In 1931, a small group of Calgary musicians created The Calgary Music Festival held at the Knox United Church. By 1954, the festival was so large the organizers asked the Kiwanis Clubs of Calgary to take ownership of the Festival, and became the Calgary Kiwanis Festival. It continued to evolve into one of the largest amateur competitive music festivals in North America by the end of the 20th century.  In 2014, the festival included theatre, resulting in another name change - The Calgary Performing Arts Festival.

Today, the Festival has over 4,000 entries and 12,000 participants performing in the new Taylor Centre for Performing Arts Centre at Mount Royal University.

Link: Calgary Performing Arts Festival

 Last minute practice...(photo credit: Calgary Performing Arts Festival)

Last minute practice...(photo credit: Calgary Performing Arts Festival)

Calgary Comic and Entertainment Expo, April 26 to 29

Calgary Expo is a four-day mash-up of comics, sci-fi, gaming and cosplay fun for all ages. In addition to headliners, hundreds of vendors, workshops and talks and costumes transform Calgary’s Stampede Park into a colourful fantasyland for over 100,000 visitors. Don’t miss the parade on the Friday - everyone can participate as long as you dress-up!

Link: Calgary Expo

  Everyone loves a parade, especially one's with princesses and super heroes!

Everyone loves a parade, especially one's with princesses and super heroes!

Calgary International Children’s Festival, May 23 to 26

Established in 1987, the Calgary International Children’s Festival has grown to become Canada’s second largest Children’s Festival. Each year it not only transforms the four theatres and concert hall of Arts Commons into a giant children’s playground, but the surrounding Olympic Plaza as well. A wonderful festival for the young and the young at heart.

Link: Calgary International Children's Festival

  Outdoor performances at Olympic Plaza a free and fun for everyone. (photo credit: Calgary Arts Development)

Outdoor performances at Olympic Plaza a free and fun for everyone. (photo credit: Calgary Arts Development)

4th Street Lilac, Festival June 3

Join 100,000+ Calgary in celebrating the arrival of spring at the 4th Street Lilac Festival.  The street comes alive with six stages and 500 vendors creating Calgary’s best street party along 4th Street SW from the Elbow River to 17th Avenue SW.

Link: 4th Street Lilac Festival

  Finally Spring has arrived in Calgary (photo credit: Carpe Diem!)

Finally Spring has arrived in Calgary (photo credit: Carpe Diem!)

Spruce Meadows, June to September

Spruce Meadows is one of North America’s most unique festival sites, offering not one, but five major international show jumping events annually – National (June 6 to 10th), Continental (June 13 to 17), North American, (July 4 to 8th) Pan American (June 26 to July 1st) and Masters (Sept 5 to 8th).  If you love horses, this is a “must see.”

Link: Spruce Meadows

 Family fun at Spruce Meadows (photo credit: Spruce Meadows Media)

Family fun at Spruce Meadows (photo credit: Spruce Meadows Media)

Sled Island, June 20 to 24

Sled Island Music & Arts Festival is a curated mash-up of music genres and art with more than 250 events at 35 different venues (record stores to Olympic Plaza) including bands, comedy, films and exhibitions involving local and international headliners and emerging artists.

Link: Sled Island

 Crosss @ Tubby Dog (photo credit: Sled Island Photo)

Crosss @ Tubby Dog (photo credit: Sled Island Photo)

Calgary Stampede, July 6 to 15

Billed as the “Greatest Outdoor Show On Earth,” the Calgary Stampede combines a 2-hour long parade attracting over 200,000+ people, as well as a Rodeo, Chuckwagon Races, Grandstand Show, Agricultural Exhibition, Midway, Indian Village and Music Festival (headliners have included Garth Brooks, Katy Perry, Keith Urban, Reba McEntire) that attracts over one million visitors of all ages and backgrounds to Stampede Park.  

Link: Calgary Stampede

 Stampede is seven festivals in one - Agricultural Exhibition, Indian Village, Rodeo, Chuckwagon Races, Grandstand Show, Midway and Music Festival. 

Stampede is seven festivals in one - Agricultural Exhibition, Indian Village, Rodeo, Chuckwagon Races, Grandstand Show, Midway and Music Festival. 

Calgary International Folk Festival, July 26 to 29

No city can match the pastoral setting of Calgary International Folk Festival held at Prince’s Island Park located in the middle of the majestic Bow River and in the shadows of Calgary’s glittering downtown skyscrapers. It’s a magical place with glowing sunsets each night on the Main Stage headliners like Coeur De Pirate, Tanya Tagaq or Blue Rodeo in 2017. During the day, enjoy the six stages for an up close and personal experience under the canopy of 100-year old cottonwood trees.

Link: Calgary International Folk Festival

  It doesn't get any better than this!

It doesn't get any better than this!

Historic Calgary Week, July 27 to August 6

For history buffs, don’t miss the hundreds of lectures and walkabouts lead by local history enthusiasts organized by Chinook Country Historical Society.  Learn all about Calgary’s boom/bust evolution from the Blackfoot nation’s summer meeting place, to the pioneer settlers, to becoming one of North America’s leading corporate headquarters cities.

Link: Historic Calgary Week

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 GlobalFest, August 16 to 25

GlobalFest burst (pun intended) onto the scene in 2003, a collaborative effort that combines an international fireworks competition with a multicultural night market. Held in Calgary’s Elliston Park with its man-made lake, just off International Avenue (aka 17th Ave SE) it celebrates Calgary’s multiculturalism.  The American Bus Association ranked it in the Top 100 Events in North America.

Link: GlobalFest

  GlobalFest fireworks (photo credit: GlobalFest and J&J Photography)

GlobalFest fireworks (photo credit: GlobalFest and J&J Photography)

Shaw Classic / Tour Champions, August 29th to September 2

Calgary is not only home to many world-class golf courses, but also to one of the premier PGA TOUR Champions events attracting one of the best international line-ups of the season.  In 2017, the Shaw Classic had one of the largest audiences of any TOUR Champions event and set a TOUR Champions fundraising record of $8.3 million for local charities.  It is a great opportunity to watch some of the greatest golfers of our time – Fred Couples loves this tournament!

Link: Shaw Classic

  The Shaw Classic attracts all of the best players from the Champions TOUR, including Fred Couples, Hal Irwin, Nick Faldo, Jose Maria Olazabal, Miguel Angel Jimenez....

The Shaw Classic attracts all of the best players from the Champions TOUR, including Fred Couples, Hal Irwin, Nick Faldo, Jose Maria Olazabal, Miguel Angel Jimenez....

Honens Piano Competition, August 30 to September 8

If you love classical music and the piano, don’t miss the Honens International Piano Competition. The quarterfinals are in Berlin and New York this spring, but the semifinals and finals are in Calgary.  The winner gets $100,000 in cash and an artist development program valued at half a millions dollars – the largest of its kind. 

Link: Honens Piano Competition

Beakerhead, Sept 19 to 23

Beakerhead, perhaps one of the most unique festivals in the world, is a wonderfully bizarre combination of science, engineering and the arts.  It encompasses 60+ events, installations and shows throughout the City Centre over five days and attracts over 125,000 participants.  Bring the entire family - including grandma and grandpa.

Link: Beakerhead

  Beakerhead seems to be especially popular with teens and 20 somethings....

Beakerhead seems to be especially popular with teens and 20 somethings....

Calgary International Film Festival,  (2018 dates needed)

For the past 17 years, Calgary has hosted “the best little film festival on the prairies.”  0ver 200 films in multiple genres are screened over 12 days attracting 40,000 cineophiles.  The Calgary Film Festival is recognized as one of the top “short film” festivals in the world. 

Link: Calgary International Film Festival

Wordfest, Oct 9 to 14

Over the past 22 years, Wordfest has showcased over 900 writers conducting readings, workshops, and panel discussions.  Last year, 70 events attracted 15,000 people of all ages including children.  Its year-round literary program culminates with this October festival featuring international best-sellers, groundbreakers and up-and-coming authors.  

Link: Wordfest

 (photo credit: Wordfest)

(photo credit: Wordfest)

Christmas In Calgary

ZOOLIGHTS,  Nov 23 to Jan 5 2019

At Christmas, 1.5 million lights transform the Calgary Zoo into a winter wonderland.  It takes about 90 minutes to fully experience the displays. In addition, there is a mix of indoor (crafts, pictures with Santa) and outdoor activities (skating, fire pits) for all ages.

Link: ZOOLIGHTS

  (photo credit: Condo Living Magazine)

(photo credit: Condo Living Magazine)

Spruce Meadows Christmas Market

Nov 16–18, Nov 23–25, & Nov 30-Dec 2

The Spruce Meadows Christmas Market gives Calgarians a shopping experience filled with entertainment, delicious food, and unique gift buying opportunities.  300+ vendors spread Christmas Spirit in the indoor comfort of Spruce Meadows’ various buildings.  Kids love Reindeer Alley, Candy Cane Lane and listening to various choirs, instrumental performances and magical dance displays amongst the 74 kilometres of Christmas lights strung around the grounds. (Seniors (65+) and Children (-12) admitted free.

Link: Spruce Meadows Christmas Market

  Spruce Meadows Christmas Market (photo credit: Spruce Meadows Media)

Spruce Meadows Christmas Market (photo credit: Spruce Meadows Media)

Lions’ Festival of Lights, Dec 1 to Jan 7

Each year the Lions Clubs of Calgary create a free Festival of Lights in Confederation Park incorporating over 450,000 bulbs on 16,000 strings into various Holiday characters.  The festival is unique as you can enjoy it many different ways – drive-by on 14th St NW, walk, snowshoe, cross-country ski or even toboggan down the hills amongst the display. Lights are on from 6 pm to midnight, 7 days a week. 

Link: Lion's Festival of Lights

  Tobogganers having fun at Lion's Festival of Lights

Tobogganers having fun at Lion's Festival of Lights

Last Word

In addition to these signature festivals, Calgary has numerous smaller festivals year round that serve niche groups, especially in film and music. For more information check out Tourism Calgary’s website: http://www.visitcalgary.com/things-to-do/festivals-events

Everyday Tourist Calgary Festival Blog Links:

Everyday Tourist Visits Calgary Expo 2016

Postcards from 2016 Calgary Folk Festival

Calgary Historic Walks