Hamilton: Mulberry Street Porchin' Band

I love porches. I love live music. I love rock & roll and the blues. I love urban surprises. Combine all these and I think I have died and gone to heaven. This is exactly what happened when I attended Hamilton’s Super Crawl Sept 13 to 16th, 2018. 

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Too Much Fun!

There I was, Friday night wandering aimlessly, getting the lay of the land on James St N.  Hearing music coming from a side street (where there was no stage), I headed into the darken street was where I was treated to a brightly lit porch with six guys playing and singing their hearts out.  I just love it – and so did the other people watching, listening and dancing to the music.  People would come listen to a few songs and then move on, but there always seemed to be 50 or so people enjoying the free show.  

I decided to see if they were there on Saturday night after the Circus Orange performance at 10ish and sure enough the band was still in full swing.  There was even a larger crowd and more people dancing.  Too much fun!

Turns out this was not an impromptu porch performance for Super Crawl, but something that happens every Friday night from 6 to 9 pm, spring, summer and fall (weather permitting) and has been happening for the past 9 years.  

Yes one of the band members owns and lives in the house. 

Some liked to listen, some liked to dance the guy with the cane was in a trance.

Some liked to listen, some liked to dance the guy with the cane was in a trance.

How did I not know this? 

Also turns out the band has an official name “Mulberry Street in’ Band,” a Facebook page and a CD. I also learned they even had the porch enlarged to make room for themselves and all of the equipment.  There are even groupies who show up regularly to listen and some love to dance.  

How cool is that?

More Info: Mulberry Street Porchin’ Band

Last Word

I was told the neighbours are all very supportive, even the 90 year old neighbour who lives next door. There is even a spot on the driveway where neighbours bring their chairs and beer so they can sit and listen to the music for the entire night if they wish.  

However, the porch performances may not last much longer as a large condo complex is under construction across the street.  I can’t imagine that all the new residents will love having loud music and noisy people dancing and playing in the street every Friday evening. They say all good things have to come to an end.  I hope “they” are wrong. 

But until then, if you happen to be in Hamilton on a Friday night (spring, summer or fall), check out the porch party near the corner of Mulberry and James St. N.  You can’t miss it.

PS. I wonder if I could use my porch for a music venue on Friday nights next summer? I will have to think about this over the winter.

This is the Mulberry Street porch house by day. You could would never suspect it could be a fun live music venue by night.

This is the Mulberry Street porch house by day. You could would never suspect it could be a fun live music venue by night.

Suburban Sprawl: Birth/Death Differential & Managing Growth

The key to city building is linking vision with the realities of the current market, economy and desired quality of life, as well as anticipating the future. It aint’ easy.   

In Calgary, numerous residential towers are now an integral part of the urban skyline.

In Calgary, numerous residential towers are now an integral part of the urban skyline.

Downtown Towers Not Enough

Recently David Gordon, The School of Urban & Regional Planning at Queen’s University published the report, “Still Suburban – Growth in Canada Suburbs, 2006 to 2016.”  The key finding was “the population of Canadian auto-dependent communities are growing much faster than the national growth rate, which is significant to note when implementing policies guiding public health, transportation, education planning, political decisions, and community design.”  

This is happening despite the efforts of every major Canadian city to develop planning policies to encourage the densification of inner-city communities. The report states, “In all our largest metropolitan areas, the portion of suburban residents is over 80%, including the Vancouver, Toronto, and Montreal. Their downtowns may be full of new condo towers, but there is five times as much population growth on the suburban edges of the regions.”  

Calgary's Beltline's streets are lined with new residential buildings with several more under construction. It is one of the City's fastest growing neighbourhoods.

Calgary's Beltline's streets are lined with new residential buildings with several more under construction. It is one of the City's fastest growing neighbourhoods.

Calgary is #1

The same is true for Calgary, where dozens of new condos and thousands of infill homes have been completed in our inner-city communities since 2006, yet the vast majority of our growth has been in the ‘burbs. In fact, Calgary has the dubious ranking of being Canada’s leader in suburban growth with 91% of our growth being in the suburbs; followed by Edmonton at 90%, Montreal 84%, Toronto 83%, Vancouver 79% and Ottawa 74%. 

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Recent Calgary population growth indicates that many of the communities near downtown are experiencing healthy population increases i.e. green areas.

Recent Calgary population growth indicates that many of the communities near downtown are experiencing healthy population increases i.e. green areas.

Is Calgary an urban densification leader? 

In fact, I contacted Gordon early this year to see if he could confirm my hypothesis that “Calgary was Canada’s leader when it came to urban densification on a per capita basis.”  This hypothesis was based on the numerous new urban village projects at various stages of development in Calgary: Garrison/ East Village / University District / Brentwood Station / Bridges / Currie / West District / Quarry Park / SETON.  Garrison Woods and Garrison Green alone added 5,000+ new residents in the early ‘00s. 

As well, the dozens of condos have completed, under construction or approved for the Beltline, Kensington, Inglewood and Marda Loop.  In fact, the 2017 Census showed the Beltline had the largest population increase of any Calgary community and that many of Calgary’s inner-city communities are indeed experiencing good population growth.  Perhaps, this is due in part to the 5,000 new infill homes (15,000 people at 3 people per home) in Calgary’s inner-city communities over the past five years. That is the equivalent of building two new Aspen Wood neighbourhoods.  

While I realize these projects were in their infancy from 2006 to 2016, I was hoping Gordon might have some stats and projections based on planned urban densification projects for Canadian cities.

Gordon responded with “As an urban designer, I find the infill projects like the Bridges, East Village, Currie /Garrison Woods, University District and Brentwood to be fascinating and follow them closely.  But our research has forced me to look again at overall patterns of metropolitan growth. And across Canada, the population of every metropolitan area was growing many times faster at the edges than by infill. Even our poster child for urbanism, Vancouver, has over 86% of its population growth occurring at the edges from 2006-2011.”

This didn’t answer my question, however, it did get me to rethink how we measure and think about inner-city and suburban growth.  

The Bridges project continues to add new urban homes for Calgarians including many families.

The Bridges project continues to add new urban homes for Calgarians including many families.

Calgary's East Village project will add 10,000+ new residents to the downtown over the next 10 years.

Calgary's East Village project will add 10,000+ new residents to the downtown over the next 10 years.

Birth/Death Differential 

Intuitively, I sensed we need to look at the population growth differently to understand what is happening. This led me to examining how the birth and death stats for suburbs vs inner-city might factor in. I contacted the City but they don’t track birth by new suburbs (developingcommunities is the City’s term) vs established communities (developedcommunities is the City’s term).  A quick look at the demographics of new suburbs vs established communities and you quickly realize there is a huge difference that puts developed communities at a HUGE disadvantage when it comes to population growth.  

I decided to do some math.

Each year Calgary has about 16,000 births, so let’s assume 70% of the births are in the newer communities or about 11,000, compared to only 5,000 in older communities.  This means every year the new communities grow twice as fast without building a single home.  

Calgary averages about 5,500 deaths each year. If we assume 90% of the deaths each year are from established neighbourhoods (where the vast majority of the old people live) this means collectively they will decline by 5,000 people each year. Ironically, this is offset by the 5,000 births, so our inner-city’s natural population growth is neutral. 

Contrastingly, in new suburbs, there are 11,000 births and only 500 deaths, so the natural population increase is 10,500, about 50% of Calgary’s 21,000 population growth migration accounted for the other 10,500) last year (2017 Census).  

This is pretty rough math, but it demonstrates urban sprawl when measured by population growth is significantly skewed in favour of the new suburbs (whoops, developing communities).    

City of Calgary Community Profiles illustrates how new communities like Cranston have significantly higher numbers of children (red numbers) and less seniors than the city average (grey numbers).

City of Calgary Community Profiles illustrates how new communities like Cranston have significantly higher numbers of children (red numbers) and less seniors than the city average (grey numbers).

Many older communities have less children and significantly more seniors.

Many older communities have less children and significantly more seniors.

Affordability Factor 

The inner-city is also at a huge disadvantage in attracting population growth compared to new suburbs as a result of affordability. In 2014, I posted a blog documenting that 80% of Calgarians can’t afford to live in the inner-city where the land costs are many times higher than in a developing community. The cost of a home in an inner-city duplex can cost a million dollars and cost of a lot $300,000.

The cost of community engagement, complexity and uncertainties of the approval process also increases the cost of inner-city houses and condos. Affordability is a huge reason why not only Calgarians, but most Canadians HAVE to live in the new urban suburbs.  

Until, Calgary (or any city) can provide equivalent housing at similar costs in older suburbs, as they can in new suburbs, most of our population growth in our city will be at the edge.  The issue is land economics and demographics, not urban design and planning. 

Link: 80% of Calgarians Must Live In The Suburbs

New master planned communities have a diversity of housing from low rise condos to row housing to estate homes. The master plan also integrates future employment and retail districts, as well as present and future transit oriented living.

New master planned communities have a diversity of housing from low rise condos to row housing to estate homes. The master plan also integrates future employment and retail districts, as well as present and future transit oriented living.

New Suburbs Are Not Evil 

It should also be recognized new suburbs are not evil like those of the middle to late 20thcentury with their sea of cookie cutter homes and little else.  New communities like Quarry Park, SETON and Providence are designed as “live/work/play” communities with a mix of housing (singles, towns, row and condos) with employment districts, as well as, retail, restaurant and recreational amenities all strategically located.  

They are designed to foster walking, transit and cycling as much as possible. In fact, Brookfield Residential’s Livingston neighbourhood will have 96% of its homes within 300m of a transit stop and a density on par with Hillhurst/Sunnyside.  

Indeed, Calgary’s new master-planned communities are a hybrid of the low-density, big box suburbs and the mixed density, main street urban villages of the future. While they aren’t perfect (no community is) they reflect the needs of today’s families for a community that has most of its amenities just a short drive away and in some cases within walking and cycling distance. And is affordable!

Typical '50s or '60s street with single family, single story homes are large lots. While many once housed 6+ people today they are home for one maybe two people.

Typical '50s or '60s street with single family, single story homes are large lots. While many once housed 6+ people today they are home for one maybe two people.

Streetscape in the new community of Livingston has two story homes on much smaller lots than those built 50+ years ago. This looks like inner-city communities without the trees.

Streetscape in the new community of Livingston has two story homes on much smaller lots than those built 50+ years ago. This looks like inner-city communities without the trees.

Last Word 

Studies like Gordon’s don’t help us understand the complexities of city-building and managing urban growth. The media loves to grab these studies and create a sense the “sky is falling.” That simply is not true. 

In reality Calgary and all Canadian cities are evolving to become more densified and more transit, walking and cycling friendly. However it is too quickly for some and too slowly for others.  

While Calgary like all Canadian cities is focused on trying to manage growth without sprawl it is very difficult due to not only demographic differences, but also do to job employment growth being primarily on the edge of the city.

While Calgary like all Canadian cities is focused on trying to manage growth without sprawl it is very difficult due to not only demographic differences, but also do to job employment growth being primarily on the edge of the city.

Does Calgary have too many neighbourhoods?

Calgary has 185 neighbourhoods and counting. But can we afford all of these neighbourhoods, each with their own Community Association and Community Centre? Many of which are chronically struggling for volunteers and funding. Is there an opportunity to merge some of the neighbourhoods to create more logical, viable and vibrant communities?

I'm torn. So I checked with Jane Jacobs the grandmother of modern urban thinking and harry Hiller, urban sociologist at the University of Calgary. Hiller thinks neighbourhoods are possibly irrelevant in the modern world. Jane thinks bigger is better. 

Let the debate begin...

Calgary has 185 neighbourhoods and counting. Traditionally, the City has been divided into four quadrants, however, in reality there are at least eight different districts.

Calgary has 185 neighbourhoods and counting. Traditionally, the City has been divided into four quadrants, however, in reality there are at least eight different districts.

Small town = Small Minded?

Creating great neighbourhoods is critical to our City’s present and future prosperity as they attract young people to want to live here. It is young people with new ideas and new energy who are the future of any city. A good neighbourhood fosters social connectedness, economic diversity, well-being and civic pride.

One of Calgary’s urban living advantages since the ‘60s has been how it has fostered small town neighbourhoods of about five to ten thousand people. From the new Legacy in the far south, to Cliff Bungalow in the core – our city has kept our communities relatively small even as it grew from 250,000 to over one million.

These small town-like neighbourhoods of about 10,000 people made it easy for hundreds of thousands of Canadians who moved here mostly from small towns to assimilate into the big city. It also psychologically makes us feel more connected to people around us. On a personal level, I know I have come to love my neighbourhood – West Hillhurst - because of its idiosyncrasies. 

However, Jane Jacobs, the legendary writer on cities and urban design, always maintained that small communities are a sentimental longing for the past. AND that we should be fostering larger more urban districts of 50,000+ citizens. She even suggests that small-town size neighbourhoods foster NIMBYism. Something we all know Calgary is plagued with.

Jacob's argued that bigger neighbourhoods are better. And as our city continues to grow, the temptation to create 'bigger' neighbourhoods looms.

Certainly there would be a cost saving in duplicated resources, and larger communities might hold more sway with city council and developers. But I think good things come from small neighbourhoods. 

The recreation centre and park in the foreground is in West Hillhurst, while the Queen Elizabeth School and fields across the street is in Hillhurst. Does this matter? (photo credit: Ross Aitken Re/Max Real Estate Central)

The recreation centre and park in the foreground is in West Hillhurst, while the Queen Elizabeth School and fields across the street is in Hillhurst. Does this matter? (photo credit: Ross Aitken Re/Max Real Estate Central)

Jane’s Logic

In 1960, Jacobs wrote the definitive book on creating great neighbourhoods – “Death and Life of Great American Cities.” Note: I have been re-reading this book over the summer.

It has become the bible for many of today’s urbanists – planners, politicians, architects and other urban influencers. You’d think someone who fought to preserve mid-century neighbourhood life, would love small neighbourhoods. But, you'd be wrong. Here’s what she said in her chapter “The Uses Of City Neighborhoods”

Neighborhood is a word that has come to sound like a Valentine. As a sentimental concept, ‘neighborhood’ is harmful to planning. It leads to attempts at warping city life into imitations of town or suburban life. Sentimentality plays with the sweet intentions in place of good sense.”

Well, Calgary certainly has suburban life – imitation or not. And we've even tried to create a vision of 19th century 'towns' – think Mackenzie Town.

Later she says: “In its pure form the ideal is a neighborhood composed of about 7,000 persons, a unit supposedly of sufficient size to populate an elementary school and to support convenience shopping and a community center.”

But, then Jacobs goes on to say the focus should be on creating districts of about 50,000 to 100,000 people.  This, she argues, would create a critical body of voters which could in turn influence politicians.

Ironically, this fits nicely with Calgary’s 14 Wards, with populations ranging from 70,000 to 105,000, each with their own schools, major park, library, recreation centre and shopping mall. But, it's probably fair to say most of us don't identify with our Ward. We are still stuck on community.

And maybe there is something to this. Maybe it is time to stop thinking of our neighbourhoods as pristine little imagined communities. Maybe we need to relax a bit when it comes to our community associations trying to gobble up resources so we can each have our very own little library or pool, school or soccer pitch, dog park or city contribution to some cultural event.

I have to admit Jane’s logic makes more sense now than perhaps it did in the ‘60s. Today, urban living means a home in one part of the city, while working in another and playing in yet another. We are just as connected with someone on the other side of the city, as we are someone on the other side of the street.

Most kids don’t grow up in their neighbourhood anymore– their daycare, schools and extra-curricular activities are rarely in their ‘hood. Recreation centers, libraries and churches are mega regional facilities that attract people from all over the quadrant.  Few walk to the library, playing field or recreation centre anymore.

Knowing this, should we plan our cities differently?

Calgary's Ward system corresponds nicely with Jane Jacob's suggestions that a city should be divided into districts of about 50,000 to 100,000 people.

Calgary's Ward system corresponds nicely with Jane Jacob's suggestions that a city should be divided into districts of about 50,000 to 100,000 people.

Interestingly, Paris is divided into 20 neighbourhoods, each with about 100,000 people.

Interestingly, Paris is divided into 20 neighbourhoods, each with about 100,000 people.

CALGARIANS LOVE THEIR NEIGHBOURHOODS

Humans have lived in small towns for millenniums. We like it when we see people we recognize at the dog park, playground or at the store. Even if we don’t know their name we will say “Hi” if we see a person frequently enough. Living in small neighbourhoods is in our DNA.

I don’t have any empirical data but based on my 35+ years of living in Calgary, I believe most Calgarians like living in their small town-like neighbourhoods. Living in West Hillhurst for over 25 years, I have come to enjoy the diversity of my community and I expect that is true for most of Calgarians.

From Avenue Magazine's 2018 ranking of Calgary neighbourhoods.

From Avenue Magazine's 2018 ranking of Calgary neighbourhoods.

Avenue Magazine's top five neighbourhoods.

Avenue Magazine's top five neighbourhoods.

Why I love West Hillhurst….

West Hillhurst was originally part of the massive 146,000-hectare Cochrane Ranch owned by the Riley family. Over the years the land has had names like Grand Trunk, Upper Hillhurst, Westmount, Parkdale Annex and Happyland.

Today it is home to 6,500 people, with the heart of the neighbourhood being West Hillhurst Park and recreation centre. It may not have all of the bells and whistles of the new mega million-dollar recreation centers on the outskirts of the City but it is works just fine.

I love that West Hillhurst is more than just a sea of luxury infill homes. Even though there has seemingly been a new infill being built on every other block for 25+ years, there are still lots of tiny cottage homes and single-story mid-century homes. I love how the past and present intermingles.

It's a bit of a jumble – schools, parks, homeless shelters, affordable housing, an abortion clinic, an ENMAX transformer, senior centres, a Lion's club, churches, a river, roads, rec centres, playgrounds, shops, and a hundred other 'things'. All of which form 'community'.

I love the social cohesion that exists in my neighbourhood - how people of all ages and backgrounds mix. I doubt West Hillhurst is unique, I expect all of Calgary’s 185 communities have their own charm and appeal.

In a big city you need a spectrum of communities that will appeal to the diversity of lifestyles from highrise living to estate homes, from co-op housing to affordable housing. A city’s richness come from the diversity of its neighbourhoods. Calgary is blessed with such!

But, it may be time for some of this wonderful uniqueness, to merge.

This early 20th century map indicates that there were several neighbourhoods in what is now Hillurst and West Hillhurst.

This early 20th century map indicates that there were several neighbourhoods in what is now Hillurst and West Hillhurst.

NEIGHBOURHOODS MUST EVOLVE

Today West Hillhurst is divided east and west by the Crowchild Trail Divide (most people think the west side is actually Parkdale).  Most people think West Hillhurst ends at Crowchild Trail and Parkdale starts on the west side of Crowchild Trail, but in fact it doesn’t start until 29th St. in fact there is are three churches that are named Parkdale but are actually in West Hillhurst.  Crowchild trail is a natural boundary / barrier between those who live on one side and those on the other of Crowchild trail.  

I will probably be tarred and feathered for saying this but perhaps it is time to re-evaluate our boundaries. They are only imaginary anyway.

Should West Hillhurst and Parkdale amalgamate? Or should West Hillhurst become part of larger Hillhurst/Sunnyside community. Maybe we should even think bigger and create a North Hill community that would combine Hillhurst/Sunnyside, West Hillhurst, Parkdale, St. Andrew’s Heights, Briar Hill and Hounsfield Heights. Should Sunalta be part of the Beltline? Should Renfrew be part of Bridgeland/Riverside? Should East Village, Downtown Commercial, Eau Claire, Chinatown and Downtown West become one downtown neighbourhood?

Many inner-city community boundaries don’t make any sense anymore. Most of them were established based on city and homebuilders’ subdivisions that are 50 years out-of-date. We just don't live that way anymore. We use our city differently.

Indeed, amalgamations have already worked for some neighbourhoods. In 2004, the communities of Connaught and Victoria Park (two of Calgary’s oldest neighbourhoods) merged to become the Beltline.

This has allowed for better planning and development. Now unified, the city was able to devised a “Blueprint for the Beltline” that charted a much more practical vision for the area. A better use of land and limited resources.

The Northern Hills Community Association is another example of where six ‘90s suburb neighbourhoods - Harvest Hills, Coventry Hills, Country Hills Estates, Panorama Hills Estates, Country Hills and Panorama Hills have come to think of themselves as one big community. Even while they keep their names, they've found collective action can bind them to each other. Thus, their recent 850m mural project - the longest in Canada.

So, perhaps it's time to stop playing the Freudian civic game of, 'who has the biggest YMCA', and start thinking about how we can better share our shiny new civic toys within the content of macro neighbourhoods. Certainly the folks at city hall, trapped in seemingly endless rounds of 'consultation' on every darn project with a near endless list of concerned citizens from 'the local neighbourhood' might, just might, find it easier to get stuff done if they had to deal with fewer folks.

Yet I think we must temper this ambition.

SIZE MATTERS?

While Jacobs thinks fostering small town living “warps” cities, I beg to differ.

I don’t think wanting to live in a small town is “a sentimental longing for the past,” but rather an intrinsic part of human happiness and well-being. So, do researchers from McGill and the Vancouver School of Economics who published a paper in May 2018, documenting that Canadians who live in small towns are happier than those living in big cities. 

Lucky for Calgarians, despite the endless sprawl, we all continue live in small towns. Perhaps that's why we are generally happy and satisfied with our quality of life.  A 2015, Stats Can study found Calgarians’ life satisfaction is higher than Vancouver’s or Toronto’s. A 2017 City of Calgary Citizen Satisfaction survey found 85% of us rated our quality of life a good. Obviously, Calgary is doing something right. Whether it's an itty bitty place like Mission, or a bigger lake-community in the south. Vive la difference!

What's critical is fostering a sense of community, a sense of belonging and personal happiness.

Perhaps we don’t need all 185 neighbourhoods. Perhaps there should be some amalgamations, but for the most part Calgary has been, and will continue to be, well served by fostering a sense of small-town living in an ever-bigger city. 

This map was posted on Twitter recently, indicating that Inglewood Ramsay was once 12 different neighbourhoods.

This map was posted on Twitter recently, indicating that Inglewood Ramsay was once 12 different neighbourhoods.

Last Word

I asked Dr. Harry H. Hiller, professor of sociology at the University of Calgary, a macro sociologist and urban sociologist if he thought Calgary has too many neighbourhoods.  He responded with:

The most important thing to know is the distinction between community of place vs. community of interest.  We often assume that community is a geographic or place based phenomenon.  While that is true, it is also a phenomenon that people create community based on mutual interests where place is irrelevant.  

We build subdivisions using principles such as walkability and community associations because we assume that people create community based on proximity of residence.  But that is no longer true.  People now may drive all over a city to find people with similar interests to their own.  This is also heightened by the creation now of digital communities where geographic proximity is totally irrelevant.  

One of my best examples of this was the old notion that every subdivision had to keep a double lot for the establishment of a local church that may have serviced 200-500 people.  Now that is not done any more as mega-churches have been created that people travel from all over to attend (e.g. Centre Street church), or people may choose to attend a church or model railroading club or lodge that services a quadrant of a city or just the city as a whole.  Community then occurs based on common interests and is not related to a local sense of community.  

We have a friend in Calgary who has become quite fascinated by a church in Dallas which I looked up and I discovered that they tell people that they can become an e-member.  So community might be local or city-wide but it can also be virtual.  

The ultimate point is that community based on place requires a much broader interpretation and geographic location might even be totally irrelevant.

Note: An edited version of this blog was published by CBC Calgary news as part of their "Road Ahead" feature. on Saturday, Sept 8, 2018.  

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

West Hillhurst: Portrait Of My Neighbourhood

Calgary's Million Dollar Neighbourhoods

Altadore: A Model 21st C Neighbourhood?

Condo Living: Too Many Amenities? 

There seems to be a bit of “one-upmanship” happening, these days in Calgary when it comes to condo amenities. Bruce McKenzie, Vice President, Business Development, NORR Architects Engineers Planners tells me they are working on a project that will have luxury guest suites in a prime location looking out onto the Elbow River, a jogging/walking track, a large garden also overlooking the Elbow River and a solar cell phone charging area. It will even have its own dog park. 

Could it be that new City Centre condos in Calgary have too many amenities?  Why is that a concern? Read on.....

Imagine this is your communal living room! If I lived at Qualex Landmark's Mark on 10th condo, I don't think I would ever leave the building.  

Imagine this is your communal living room! If I lived at Qualex Landmark's Mark on 10th condo, I don't think I would ever leave the building.  

Bucci's Radius condo in Bridgeland will have a community garden on its rooftop. What a great way to meet your neighbours without leaving the building.

Bucci's Radius condo in Bridgeland will have a community garden on its rooftop. What a great way to meet your neighbours without leaving the building.

BBQs to Bocce Courts 

He also notes their University District’s Rhapsody condo will have a huge rooftop deck with everything from cabanas and BBQ stations to bocce courts. He said, “It seems like everyone is trying to outdo the next guy!” 

This may well have started in about 2014 when Concord condo was announced with its all-season garden (i.e. garden in the summer; private skating rink in the winter), two story garages so you can store all of your four and two-wheel toys and even have your own work bench. There is also a golf simulator, luxury pool area with its own resort-like lounge, as well as an upscale workout/yoga studio.  

This could be all yours if you lived at the Concord....why would you want to leave?

This could be all yours if you lived at the Concord....why would you want to leave?

Not to be outdone Qualex/Landmark did away with the penthouse suites in their Mark on 10th project, replacing them with amazing rooftop amenities for all residents. This includes an outdoor BBQ area with a large hot tub with spectacular mountain views and a huge lounge area with kitchen floor to ceiling window overlooking downtown.

Who needs to go to the spa when this is your hot tub at Mark on 10th? 

Who needs to go to the spa when this is your hot tub at Mark on 10th? 

Bikes / Beer / Zen

N3 condo's roof top offers amazing views of the downtown and sunsets while you cook up dinner on the BBQ. 

N3 condo's roof top offers amazing views of the downtown and sunsets while you cook up dinner on the BBQ. 

Even the “no parking” N3 condo project in East Village, has a spectacular outdoor roof-top amenity with great views of new Central Library, the National Music Centre, Stampede Park, downtown, Bow and Elbow Rivers and the Rockies.

It also has an attractive indoor roof-top exercise room and the BBQ area has become the communal living room for residents.

Right outside their front door is the funky Brewer’s Apprentice offering 48 beers on tap that you can take home and just around the corner is Tim Hortons. No need to venture very far. 

Parham Mahboubi, Vice President, Planning & Marketing, Qualex Landmark tells me “When we design building common areas and amenities, we are thoughtful of how these spaces contribute to bringing neighbours together. For example, in Park Point, about 9,000 square feet of amenity areas offer homeowners a place to converge, whether it is the outdoor Zen Terrace, the infrared sauna, gym, yoga/pilates spaces or the outdoor lounge and BBQ area." 

As I was writing this piece for Condo Living Magazine,  I happened upon Minto Communities’ Annex project in Kensington designed by Calgary's Nyhoff Architecture. I learned they will have a multi-use roof-top that will include dog run, a fire pit area, BBQs and what looks like a shuffleboard area.  

Minto Communities' Annex condo rooftop in Kensington will offer spectacular views of downtown, as well as a private urban playground. Who needs noisy street patios? 

Minto Communities' Annex condo rooftop in Kensington will offer spectacular views of downtown, as well as a private urban playground. Who needs noisy street patios? 

Last Word

The trend to building in-house amenities in new condos may well be counter-productive, as the whole idea of increasing the number of people living in the City Center was to create more street life.  

In theory the new urbanites would live in their condos but leave them to mix and mingle in their neighbourhood cafes, lounges, bistros, yoga/fitness studios, parks and pathways - be that Beltline, East Village, Eau Clare, Downtown or Mission.  

Who is going to do that when you have your own lounges, fitness areas, pools, hot tubs and park-like spaces in your own building. 

I wonder what is next!

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Importance of Comfort, Convenience & Privacy 

Urban living is in its infancy in Calgary

21st Century: Century of the condo?

Is Calgary going to the dogs?

For a long time now, I have been telling developers (both urban and suburban) they should create more amenities for dog owners.  Finally, it looks like they are listening!

In fact, it might be said Calgary is “going to the dogs,” but in a good way. I have said it before and I am saying it again, Calgary is "Dog Park capital of North America!" If you love dogs, you will love this blog! 

Calgary has over 100 off-leash areas scattered across the city.

Calgary has over 100 off-leash areas scattered across the city.

However, there there is a void of dog parks in the City Centre, but that could be changing soon.

However, there there is a void of dog parks in the City Centre, but that could be changing soon.

Urban Dog Parks

It seems everywhere I go and everybody I talk to these days is telling me about how developers are adding dog-friendly elements to their communities. 

Recently, University District opened their North Park which features a small fenced off dog park area. What I love most about this is that the dog park has been completed before anyone even moves into University District.  And it is proving to be popular with those living in nearby Montgomery, Varsity and University Heights.  Hmmm…is this a clever sales strategy?

And, Bruce McKenzie, Vice President, Business Development, NORR Architects Engineers Planners tells me they have designed for a developer a large luxury condo project in Mission that will include its own dog park.  And the multi-use rooftop at Minto Communities’ Annex project in Kensington, designed by Nyhoff Architecture will include dog run.  How cool is that?

East Village has embraced dogs also, opening up a temporary fenced-in dog park on a little triangular piece of land across from Ron Moppett’s mural made up of 950,000 colourful tiles. I am thinking they need to find a site for a permanent dog park given the Village will eventually be home to 10,000+ people.  With Calgary currently having about one dog for every 10 people, that could be a lot of dogs living in East Village when fully built out.  

The Beltline learned about the importance of dog parks a few years ago so they renovated Connaught Park 2015 to include a fenced-off dog park.  It has since become one of the community’s most popular hangout places.  Too bad they didn’t make the new East Victoria Park a dog park - I rarely see anyone in the park along Macleod Trail.  I bet if they converted it to a dog park, it would have people (and dogs) there all the time.  

The Annex's model shows a roof-top dog run, I am thinking this is a first in Calgary. 

The Annex's model shows a roof-top dog run, I am thinking this is a first in Calgary. 

Connaught Park has a fenced in dog park is a popular place for those living in the Beltline to hang out with friends - human and canine. 

Connaught Park has a fenced in dog park is a popular place for those living in the Beltline to hang out with friends - human and canine. 

The new temporary dog park in East Village occupies a small piece of unused grass.  Dog parks can utilize spaces that are difficult to develop. 

The new temporary dog park in East Village occupies a small piece of unused grass.  Dog parks can utilize spaces that are difficult to develop. 

Why I love dog parks?

Full disclosure – I don’t own a dog and never have in my adult life. But I do dog sat regularly for friends in Altadore.  That means trips to River Park twice, sometimes three times a day.  What impresses me most about River Park is how devoted many dog owners are to walking their dog and how social the experience is for both the owners and the dogs. 

I have seen dozens of people walking their dogs in blizzard conditions. One night at -30 degrees, there was a dog walking group out walking. That’s dedication! 

What I love about dog parks is that they are used seven days a week, morning, noon and night, 12 months of the year.  I am not sure any of Calgary’s other 5,200 parks can claim that - most only get used seasonally. 

I also enjoy the fact that not only do the dogs come in all shapes and sizes but dog parks are full of people from all walks of life. I often see young families and small groups of retirees out walking their dogs and chatting with each other, as well as individuals.  Almost always they will smile and say “Hi” and in some cases we strike up a conversation.

When urbanists talk about creating inclusive gathering places – nothing beats a dog park.  

River Park in the summer is a busy place from sunrise to sunset. 

River Park in the summer is a busy place from sunrise to sunset. 

It is even busy in the winter....

It is even busy in the winter....

Are they crazy?

While writing this piece, I was shocked by a twitter post by Josh White, General Manager, Development at Dream Unlimited (a real estate developer) noting Calgary Parks objected to the inclusion of a one-acre, off-leash dog park as part of a 14-acre community park in their new southwest community of Providence. Why? Because it “caters to one user instead of a variety of users.”  

The dog park will cater to people of all ages and backgrounds and it will be used year-round.  It will be the most important community building amenities in the new community.  

I hope Parks will get their head out of the sand and let Josh build his dog park. In my opinion, we should be insisting all new communities and major condos include a dog park or dog run. 

West Hillhurst dog park offers great views of the City's skyline, as well as a chance to chat with friends and neighbours. 

West Hillhurst dog park offers great views of the City's skyline, as well as a chance to chat with friends and neighbours. 

Last Word 

Yes, I do make a point of researching and visiting dog parks when I am visiting others cities.  I have seen some amazing ones in Las Vegas, Palm Springs and some pretty ugly ones in places like Berlin.  But I have never seen anything to match Calgary’s River Park or upper Edworthy Park for their size, varied terrain and spectacular views.  

I am thinking Calgary has the potential to become the “dog park capital of the world.”  

An edited version of this blog appeared in the Calgary Herald's New Condo section August 26, 2018.

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Dog Parks Foster A Sense Of Community 

Calgary: The Dog Park Capital of North America

Public Art: Rocks? Keys? Dog & Bone?

Welcome to the era of neuro-design?

Could it be that in the near future urban designers will be collaborating with neuroscientist and psychologists to design buildings that make people feel comfortable rather than disoriented and encourage socialization vs isolation that is too often the case.

It could happen!  It has happened?

In fact, the Alberta Children's Hospital was designed based on input from the children who wanted large windows and bright colours.  They wanted it to be a happy looking place.    Perhaps rather than consulting with   neuroscientist and psychologists    the design team shou ld consult with the end users more. To me this is a happy, welcoming place - exactly what it should be.

In fact, the Alberta Children's Hospital was designed based on input from the children who wanted large windows and bright colours.  They wanted it to be a happy looking place.  Perhaps rather than consulting with neuroscientist and psychologists the design team should consult with the end users more. To me this is a happy, welcoming place - exactly what it should be.

The old children's hospital was a dull, depressing, institutional building.

The old children's hospital was a dull, depressing, institutional building.

Collaboration?

Indeed, the Conscious Cities Conference in London in 2017 brought together architects, designers, engineers, neuroscientists and psychologists, all of whom cross paths at an academic level, but rarely do so in practice, to discuss how they might collaborate.

What did they learn? 

Intuitively we all know the shape, colour and size of buildings affect the mood and well-being of humans. Now scientists have discovered specialized cells in the hippocampal region of the human our brains that processes each individual’s unique sense of geometry and space.  

More and more architects in Calgary are using bold colours as a key element of the building's facade. Public art is also being use more to create a more varied and interesting streetscape.

More and more architects in Calgary are using bold colours as a key element of the building's facade. Public art is also being use more to create a more varied and interesting streetscape.

Calgary's City Centre parkade is a good example of late '70s early '80s bland, utilitarian parkade design.

Calgary's City Centre parkade is a good example of late '70s early '80s bland, utilitarian parkade design.

The Centennial parkade is a good example of how modern parkades are created to enhance the sense of place. In this case the parkade mirrors the warehouse history of the land next to the CPR tracks in its use of brick and its height. 

The Centennial parkade is a good example of how modern parkades are created to enhance the sense of place. In this case the parkade mirrors the warehouse history of the land next to the CPR tracks in its use of brick and its height. 

The SAIT parkade is also a huge mural that can be enjoyed by tens of thousands of LRT riders everyday. It is a work of art! No more blank walls!

The SAIT parkade is also a huge mural that can be enjoyed by tens of thousands of LRT riders everyday. It is a work of art! No more blank walls!

Rounded vs Rectangular 

Using modern technology scientists have attempted to measure humans’ physiological responses to architecture and streetscapes, using wearable devices such as bracelets that monitor skin conductance (a marker of physiological arousal), smartphone apps that ask subjects about their emotional state, and electroencephalogram (EEG) headsets that measure brain activity relating to mental states and mood. 

A recently published study using visual reality technology concluded most people like curved edges and rounded contours rather than sharp-edged rectangular shaped buildings and rooms. However, the design students among the participants preferred the opposite. This could be a red flag! 

A study in Iceland found participants viewed various residential street scenes and found the ones with the most architectural variation the most mentally engaging. Not exactly rocket science, Jane Jacobs (author book “Death and Life of American Cities” in 1961) and others have been saying this for decades. 

The curved staircase at Calgary's new Shane Homes Rocky Ridge Recreation Centre is an example of creating more public friendly urban design. 

The curved staircase at Calgary's new Shane Homes Rocky Ridge Recreation Centre is an example of creating more public friendly urban design. 

The Royal a condo/retail project is an example of the sharp edge rectangular design preferred by urban designers.   

The Royal a condo/retail project is an example of the sharp edge rectangular design preferred by urban designers.   

Surprise! Surprise!

Another study looked at street patterns and found being lost and disoriented creates negative feelings.  Cities with grid-pattern numbered streets like New York are easy to navigate London’s hotchpotch of neighbourhoods all orientated differently is notoriously confusing. Another study documented districts with high-rises are more confusing and unpleasant to walk around than those with low-rise buildings.

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Urban streetscapes like this are not public friendly. 

Urban streetscapes like this are not public friendly. 

Red Flag 

The fact that design students in the virtual reality study preferred hard-edges and rectangular shapes the opposite to the general public participants is a definite red flag.  

Could it be the brains of those attracted to the urban design professions are wired diametrically opposed to the general publics?  That would be an interesting study!

I know when I was a public art gallery curator it was obvious to me there is a huge gap between what artists and curators  finds interesting and what the public like to see in the way of art exhibitions.  Hence the term “art for art’s sake” i.e. that the chief aim of a work of art is the self-expression of the artist.  

Could the same be said for architects, landscape architects or interior designers? Could that be why they design minimalist buildings, lobbies and public spaces that are often alienating to the public? Are they designing for themselves and their colleagues not for the public? 

The question is: “Would architects, landscape architects and interior designers be willing to collaborate with neuro scientists and psychologist to have they designs tested to make sure they are “people friendly” before they get built.

Calgary's four tallest buildings illustrate how architecture has evolved from the early '80s (Suncor Energy Tower, former Petro Canada Tower) to the new Telus Sky currently under construction.   

Calgary's four tallest buildings illustrate how architecture has evolved from the early '80s (Suncor Energy Tower, former Petro Canada Tower) to the new Telus Sky currently under construction.   

Brookfield Place is a good example of minimalist architecture with its monolithic, monochromatic, translucent glass facade from the base to the roof.  Unlike the big box offices of the '70s it has rounded corners to give it a softer appearance more elegant appearance. 

Brookfield Place is a good example of minimalist architecture with its monolithic, monochromatic, translucent glass facade from the base to the roof.  Unlike the big box offices of the '70s it has rounded corners to give it a softer appearance more elegant appearance. 

The triangular Next Tower, formerly Nova Tower, would be a good example of the hard-edge minimalist architecture of the '80s that some found very confrontational.   

The triangular Next Tower, formerly Nova Tower, would be a good example of the hard-edge minimalist architecture of the '80s that some found very confrontational.   

Telus Sky is the polar opposite of Brookfield Place with its articulated facade that tapers as the use changes from office for the lower floors to residential for the upper floors, creating an intriguing and unique shape. 

Telus Sky is the polar opposite of Brookfield Place with its articulated facade that tapers as the use changes from office for the lower floors to residential for the upper floors, creating an intriguing and unique shape. 

Bow Valley Square is a good example of '80s rectangular office tower architecture. 

Bow Valley Square is a good example of '80s rectangular office tower architecture. 

Architect says…

A quick email to a few architects resulted in some interesting comments. Charles Olfert a principle at aobdt architecture + interior design in Saskatoon perhaps said it best, “I do think the education of architects plays a big role in the way we design and perceive beauty in buildings.

We are taught to appreciate clean, modern spaces and the magazines we read reinforce this. The winners of architectural competitions and awards tend to encourage this perspective as well. The result is indeed a disconnect with people who have not had that ‘education’, so I am not surprised the general public would not be excited by what most architects are.”

However, Olfert thinks “to try somehow do a scientific and social analysis of aesthetics doesn’t seem useful. I have come to appreciate much later in my career the experience of a building is really complicated and aesthetics might be a relatively minor factor. Why are you at the building? Does it work for what you wanted? Do you already have some preconceptions because of who owns it, works in it or what it represents? What’s the neighborhood context?

A few years ago I read “The Architecture of Happiness” by AlainDeBotton.  It was pivotal, and changed my approach to the design of projects. Instead of focussing on what the program or client ask for, I now tend to first try make sure the building has at least a few spaces and/or details that make you happy. It’s actually not that hard. It usually involves strategic windows and an opportunity for some “wow” factor, even at a small scale.”

The new Mount Royal University's parade uses vertical neon green bars to break up what would have been a dull horizontal wall. 

The new Mount Royal University's parade uses vertical neon green bars to break up what would have been a dull horizontal wall. 

The designers of this is small condo project in the Marda Loop used colour to create not only a playful rhythm but to add the illusion of huge windows.    To me this is a happy building.

The designers of this is small condo project in the Marda Loop used colour to create not only a playful rhythm but to add the illusion of huge windows.  To me this is a happy building.

Architect Jack Long's 1961, Calgary Planetarium and Science Center was a classic example of  "Brutalist" architecture. 

Architect Jack Long's 1961, Calgary Planetarium and Science Center was a classic example of  "Brutalist" architecture. 

The colour elements were added later to make it more child-like and playful.  Or as some might say "tarted it up!" 

The colour elements were added later to make it more child-like and playful.  Or as some might say "tarted it up!" 

Are architects doing better job? 

Do we like The Princeton better than Eau Claire 500 condo next door? Do we like the condo towers in East Village better than those built in West Downtown in the ‘90s? Do we like the University City’s bold yellow, orange, green and red towers at the Brentwood LRT Station better than SASS0 and NUERA at Stampede Station? Do we like the new condos being built today at SETON compared to those around Market Mall in the ‘70s and ‘80s? 

Princeton condo (on the left) is an example of theearly 21st century's architecture with a distinct base, middle and roof-top, softer edges and warmer colours.  On the right, is the '80s architecture of Eau Claire 500 with its hard edges, flat facade and brooding colour. 

Princeton condo (on the left) is an example of theearly 21st century's architecture with a distinct base, middle and roof-top, softer edges and warmer colours.  On the right, is the '80s architecture of Eau Claire 500 with its hard edges, flat facade and brooding colour. 

Do Calgarians like The Bow with its curved shape and diagonal lines, plaza and public art, better than the minimalist Brookfield Place with its rounded edges and public lobby.

Do we like edgy Eighth Avenue Place with its articulated roof top, vertical thrust and cathedral-like lobby versus it neighbour Husky Towers with rounded gold coloured glass edges. 

Do we like new Telus Sky with its twisted articulated façade and strange bottle-like shape versus the oval-shaped reflective deep blue glassed 707 Fifth street office building? How do they compare to  ‘70s TD Square or Scotia Tower and the ‘80s Bankers Hall?

Do we like the oval shaped, patterned façade of the new Calgary Central Library better than the strange shaped, dark snake-like skinned of National Music Centre or translucent glass, crystal shaped TELUS Spark building better? How do they compare with the Glenbow? Do we like the South Health Campus building better than the Rockyview Hospital? 

Calgary's new central library has many of the elements that neuroscientist and psychologists say make a building more public friendly. 

Calgary's new central library has many of the elements that neuroscientist and psychologists say make a building more public friendly. 

Calgary's old Central Library opened 1963 as part of an urban renewal project planned for the Downtown's East End. 

Calgary's old Central Library opened 1963 as part of an urban renewal project planned for the Downtown's East End. 

Last Word

Could it be that those big square box office and residential buildings that dominated Calgary’s City Centre in the mid to late 20thcentury actually negatively affect our mood and well-being. 

Could it be Calgary’s cookie cutter suburban homes and boring streets also negatively affect our well-being? What about those big box power centres - are they places where we want to linger and socialize with family and friends?

Just asking?

Reader Comments:

I received several emails in response to this blog.  I thought this one from Art Froese, who was the project manager for the Alberta Children's Hospital was particularly enlightening.  

As usual, you’re on to something but needs more time. Finding the truth & the essence of things takes time. Remember always there are two questions: “ What’s new? / What’s old?”

Round is the world of our historic ancestors. Every aboriginal shelter is round: teepee [really egg-shaped]; igloo; gurt in Mongolia; African homes, crawls etc; Australia - follow the list. Round is harder to build.

The Children’s Hospital gathering space in the middle of the building is round. This is not an accident. The philosophy of the building is three concentric circles: the children; the caregivers; the landscape. It took forever to get the architects to understand the concept. It took seconds for my native advisory panel of Elders from Treaty Seven to understand. 

The biggest price we’ve paid in developed countries is that we’ve dulled our senses. I have many examples of this from my wilderness adventures. Or just read “Tribe” by Sebastian Junger.

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

The Curse Of Minimalism

Calgary: A Pop Of Colour

Urban Design: Does Anybody Really Care?

 

 

POSTCARDS from BROOKLYN

Brooklyn has been on my list of places to go for a few years now as I have been reading and hearing lots of interesting things about its renaissance.  

Link: Brooklyn 101

I was a bit jealous when I recently learned my friend Tom Tittemore (architect and public art advocate) was heading to Brooklyn so I told him to take lots of photos and perhaps think about doing guest blog.  

And he did....
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Postcards from Tom

I recently enjoyed my fifth visit to New York City, and planned a day visit to Brooklyn as part of my ambitious itinerary.  This Borough of NYC was a complete mystery to me, although walking across the Brooklyn Bridge for the first time on New Year’s Day in 2015 provided some initial, fleeting glimpses.  Coney Island, Carol King and the Brooklyn Dodgers were some of the cultural references I had accumulated over the years relative to this renowned community.

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Joined by my wife Carol, and dear friends Terry and Denise from Kitchener, I embarked on the ‘F’ subway mid-morning from the Rockefeller Station in Midtown Manhattan. Upon leaving the underground section beneath the East River, the ‘F’ line continued on an elevated platform for the better part of an hour, offering wonderful vistas of Brooklyn until we reached the end terminal at Coney Island.

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The Atlantic Ocean, Brighton Beach, protruding wharves, the Boardwalk, embellished storefronts and rectangular designated ride ‘precincts’ define the ‘layered’ parti of this iconic midway.  I took a ride on the ‘Cyclone’, constructed in the late 1920s and a true Mecca for rollercoaster enthusiasts.  Enjoying the front seat solo, my smile changed quickly to a grimace once the G forces kicked in on the first vertical plunge.  Exhilarating!!

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My return destination on the ‘F’ Line took us through the Brooklyn Heights neighborhood, where I discovered Atlantic Avenue, an older distant cousin of 9th Avenue in Inglewood.  Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to explore nearby Brooklyn Heights Brownstone residential neighborhoods, nor the famed Brooklyn Museum.  Next time …

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Atlantic Avenue’s western end merges gracefully into the promenade of the Brooklyn Bridge Park, an inspiring redevelopment of the former Brooklyn dockyards.  A number of the former piers have been repurposed into popular recreation zones. Pier 3 is a soccer pitch and Pier 5 accommodates a number of short basketball courts.  Along the entire Parkway, tremendous vistas of lower Manhattan are presented, ending, of course, at the Brooklyn Bridge.

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My second trek across the Bridge was every bit as memorable as the first.  Crowded, a bit dangerous with cyclist sharing the route – a complete New York experience.

The north-east ‘F’ Line concludes at the Jamaica Station in Queens.  Guess where I’m going next time I visit The Big Apple!

Lessons Learned

  1. The overall subway experience highlighted by the Rockefeller Centre station, the panoramic, above grade trip through Brooklyn itself, the middle / Coney Island Station, and the end / Grand Central Station made me think Calgary should aspire to having a light rail transit system with such iconic and memorable stations that invite people to simply travel the system for its own sake and explore the city.
  2. The development of Calgary’s Bow River promenade has the same basis as the Brooklyn Bridge Park, albeit on a significantly reduced scale: meandering beside a significant river, views to prominent and in most cases good architecture, places for rest and people watching, natural landscaping, higher density housing, complimentary pedestrian and cycling lanes, local history made it a very pleasant experience. 
  3. Brooklyn Bridge reminded me that sometimes, you need to invest in unique and iconic artifacts to celebrate the place where you live and make the basic needs of walking – memorable!

Tom Tittemore

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Now I'm really jealous...

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I'd love to flaneur DUMBO, short for “Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass” which has become Brooklyn's most expensive neighborhood, as well as New York City's fourth-richest community overall owing to its large concentration of technology startups, its close proximity to Manhattan and its large number of former industrial buildings that have been converted into spacious luxury residential lofts.

The neighborhood currently serves as the corporate headquarters for e-commerce retailer Etsy, home furnishing store West Elm and Bjarke Ingles Group (BIG) architects who just happen to be the architects of Calgary’s newest signature building Telus Sky. 

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The Brooklyn Bridge is not only an architectural/engineering gem, it is a popular commuter route with 10,000 pedestrians and 3,500 cyclists on weekdays and this total can swell to 30,000+ on weekends in the summer. It is often called the “Times Square In the Sky” because it is such a popular public space like Times Square. 

It is 1825m long or about 14 times the length of Calgary’s Peace Bridge.   This is on my "bucket list."

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I would also like to check out the Brooklyn Bridge Park to see how it compares to other river parks I have experienced in other cities from Hong Kong to Frankfurt, from Berlin to Calgary. 

And I love wandering residential urban streets, so Brooklyn Height's brownstones will be at the top of my list. 

Unlike Tom, when I go to Brooklyn it will be for at least a week, not a day. 

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Chicago's Gold Coast: Stairways To Heaven

A FREE trip to NYC (Almost)

River Cruising in Chicago

 

Calgary vs. Edmonton: Who has the best river valley parks? 

Recently I tweeted out that Calgary may well have the best urban river public spaces in the Canada - maybe even the world. While many agreed with me, one response from an Edmonton follower shared an excerpt from Wikipedia saying:

Edmonton has the largest urban park system in Canada with 20 major parks and attractions.”  

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The City of Edmonton's website.

The City of Edmonton's website.

Really?

Quick mental calculations made me think Calgary could easily match or exceed that with our three amazing river valleys – Bow, Elbow and Fish Creek.  And Calgary easily has over 160 kilometres of river pathways. 

So, I tweeted back, "The challenge is on!” 

And I immediately started doing the math to see if Calgary’s river valley could beat 20 parks and attractions.

Bow River Valley Parks

  1. Bowness Park
  2. Bowmont Park
  3. Edworthy Park
  4. Douglas Fir Trail 
  5. Shouldice Athletic Park
  6. Shaw Millennium Park
  7. Prince’s Island Park
  8. St. Patrick’s Island Park
  9. Calgary Zoo and Botanical Garden 
  10. Inglewood Bird Sanctuary/Fish Hatchery  
  11. Harvie Passage 
  12. Sue Higgins Park 
  13. Carburn Park 
William Hawrelak Park is perhaps Edmonton's signature urban park. 

William Hawrelak Park is perhaps Edmonton's signature urban park. 

Prince's Island is Calgary's signature urban park. 

Prince's Island is Calgary's signature urban park. 

Edmonton's North Saskatchwan River Vallery is a place to escape from the city.

Edmonton's North Saskatchwan River Vallery is a place to escape from the city.

The Douglas Fir Trail is just one of the many places in Calgary's river valley where you can escape the city.   

The Douglas Fir Trail is just one of the many places in Calgary's river valley where you can escape the city.  

Elbow River Valley Parks

  1.   Weaselhead Flats
  2.   Glenmore Reservoir
  3.   Heritage Park
  4.   North & South Glenmore Parks
  5.   River Park/Sandy Beach
  6.   Riverdale Park
  7.   Stanley Park
  8.   Lindsay Park
  9.   Stampede Park 
  10.   Fort Calgary Park

And then of course there is the massive, Fish Creek Park that encompasses the entire creek valley within the city’s boundaries. One of the largest urban parks in North America, it stretches 19 km from east to west. At 13.5 square kilometers, it is over three times the size of Vancouver's Stanley Park.

S.S. Moyie on Calgary's Glenmore Reservoir.

S.S. Moyie on Calgary's Glenmore Reservoir.

Early morning walk along Calgary's Elbow River. Can you spot the walker?

Early morning walk along Calgary's Elbow River. Can you spot the walker?

Elbow River Camp at Stampede Park.

Elbow River Camp at Stampede Park.

Attractions along the river

Edmonton’s Kinsmen Centre and Calgary’s Repsol Sport Centre (in Lindsay Park) are probably on par with each other as recreational facilities, but ours is an architectural gem. 

Calgary can’t match Edmonton’s Convention Centre, but our equivalent would be Stampede Park, which includes the BMO Centre.

Edmonton has a baseball diamond in their river valley, Calgary has the Saddledome on the Elbow River. 

While Edmonton has riverboat cruises, Calgary has the S.S. Moyie paddlewheeler on the Glenmore Reservoir.  In addition, Calgary has thousands of floating rafts, kayaks, canoes and paddle boarders something I understand Edmontonians don’t do as much. Oh, and what about river surfing at Louise Bridge and some the best fly-fishing in the world all along the Bow River.

What does Edmonton have to match the Calgary Zoo, Fort Calgary, Heritage Park and Shaw Millennium Park?  Fort Edmonton for sure and the Muttart Conservatory? Anything else? 

Edmonton has the 100th St funicular (an elevator for small groups of people and bikes) that links downtown with the river valley.  Calgary’s river valleys are more accessible so we don’t really need a funicular.  Calgary has the Crescent Heights staircase that we have turned into a unique recreation experience. 

Edmonton’s Folk Festival in Gallagher Park is definitely more internationally renowned than Calgary’s.  But we do have that world’s “Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth” happening at Stampede Park which just happens to be along the Elbow River.

What about golf courses within the city limits? Calgary has six: Valley Ridge, Inglewood, Calgary Golf & Country Club, Lakeview, McKenzie Meadows and Blue Devil. Edmonton also has six: Windermere, Royal Mayfair, Victoria, Riverside, Rundle Park and Raven Crest.

Calgary's International Folk Festival's home is Prince's Island which is located on the edge of downtown in the middle of the Bow River.

Calgary's International Folk Festival's home is Prince's Island which is located on the edge of downtown in the middle of the Bow River.

Edmonton Folk Festival in Gallagher Park (photo credit: CTV News)

Edmonton Folk Festival in Gallagher Park (photo credit: CTV News)

Edmonton's Shaw Conference Centre is built into the bank of the North Saskatchewan River. 

Edmonton's Shaw Conference Centre is built into the bank of the North Saskatchewan River. 

Muttart Conservatory is one of Edmonton's architectural gems.

Muttart Conservatory is one of Edmonton's architectural gems.

Repsol Sport Centre is one of Calgary's architectural gems. 

Repsol Sport Centre is one of Calgary's architectural gems. 

Edmonton's High Level Bridge at night.

Edmonton's High Level Bridge at night.

Calgary's Reconciliation Bridge at night.

Calgary's Reconciliation Bridge at night.

Edmonton's new Waterdale Bridge.

Edmonton's new Waterdale Bridge.

Fort Edmonton Park.

Fort Edmonton Park.

Calgary's Heritage Park.

Calgary's Heritage Park.

Public spaces along the river

Does Edmonton have the numerous natural pebble beaches along their river valley that Calgary has?  

What about urban promenades like Calgary’s Eau Claire or East Village? Can Edmonton match these urban gems?

Can Edmonton’s downtown workers easily walk to the river and back at lunch hour?

Can Edmonton match Calgary’s iconic river bridges – Centre Street, Peace Bridge and George King Bridge? Yes, Edmonton has the High Level Bridge.

Can Edmonton match Calgary’s Elbow River Camp (formerly Indian Village) at Stampede Park? What about a theatre space like Calgary's Pumphouse Theatre?  

What about river island parks? Does Edmonton have anything to match Prince’s, St. Patrick and St. George’s islands?

Edmonton's downtown beach.

Edmonton's downtown beach.

The green beach in Calgary's Stanley Park. 

The green beach in Calgary's Stanley Park. 

The pebble beach in downtown Calgary's St. Patrick's Park is a popular family spot. 

The pebble beach in downtown Calgary's St. Patrick's Park is a popular family spot. 

River surfing has also become a popular activity in downtown Calgary.

River surfing has also become a popular activity in downtown Calgary.

Paddling along the Bow River has become a very popular summer activity in Calgary. (photo credit @surrealplaces) 

Paddling along the Bow River has become a very popular summer activity in Calgary. (photo credit @surrealplaces) 

Second opinions

I decided to send my unscientific analysis to a couple of friends who live in Edmonton but have lived in Calgary to see if I was being fair. Both were adamant I wasn’t.  

Terry Bachynski who had lived in both cities for about 18 years each wrote:

“Calgary has a great river valley, but Edmonton's river valley is spectacular. 

Comparing the two river valleys against one another is not an apples to apples thing.  The two cannot be compared and "winner" identified.   The two valleys are completely different, not only in their geography, but how each river valley relates to and is integral to the respective city.   

Edmonton's river valley is a sharp, well defined river escarpment running through the heart of the city with very little commercial or residential development. Calgary's river valleys are much more tapered.  The entire downtown and beyond is built at the bottom of the escarpment, right on the river flood plain.  You don't even climb out of the south side of the Bow River Valley until you climb up to the green on the first hole of the Calgary Golf and Country Club.  

 Calgary's river valley is integrated into the rhythm and flow of the urban downtown experience because the downtown is in the river valley.  While Edmonton's river valley is more an escape from the city right in the heart of the city.  

 Being a veteran of 60 marathons and a dozen ultra-marathons, I have logged a lot of miles in both river valleys.  I have run literally thousands of kilometers in Calgary and Edmonton along the rivers and I have to concede that Edmonton's river path system is second to none.  You can literally run for hours and not even be aware there is a city all around you.  Edmonton's River Valley is a near continuous, uninterrupted park experience. 

Not so with Calgary's trails.  There are constant reminders of the city confronting you all along the trail, from Fish Creek Park all the way to Bowness Park.  Calgary's river valley is urban by necessity and design."  

Ice Castles in Edmonton's Hawrelak Park. 

Ice Castles in Edmonton's Hawrelak Park. 

To each their own!

Terry continues, "Both work for both cities.  But, if I had my choice, the escape from the city is preferred.  

 In your analysis you kind of skimp on the other pluses of the Edmonton River Valley.  The Muttart Conservatory, three river valley ski hills inside city limits, the sandy beaches that pop up every summer to enjoy, The Edmonton Zoo (granted, it can't hold a candle to the Calgary Zoo, but for a day's outing with a young family, still very rewarding), the Equestrian Centre just down the road from Fort Edmonton, where you can go horseback riding along the river, mountain bike trails (also great for ultra-marathon training), canoeing and the many, many parks offer everything you can think of.  

So, in my mind, both river valleys really reflect the cities and both work for both cities.  Neither wins.  To say one is better than the other is like saying golf is better than baseball.  To each his/her own.  

Chris White (no relation) wrote “I would say your draft is not "fair" but very enjoyable none the lessYour blog talks about "things," but people don't have things, they have experiences. Of course, your challenge is that experiences are subjective. But we shouldn't pretend that "things" are objective. If I were to sum up the difference for me, I would say the Edmonton valley is a more private experience. I’m very glad the two cities don’t try to duplicate each other. I don’t want to sound harsh, but a point-for-point comparison seems misguided, even un-Canadian.”

Edmonton's spectacular new funicular and stairs is a lovely urban public space.

Edmonton's spectacular new funicular and stairs is a lovely urban public space.

Roof top patio in Calgary's East Village offers great views of the Bow River. 

Roof top patio in Calgary's East Village offers great views of the Bow River. 

Likewise, Calgary's new West Eau Claire park with the Peace Bridge is a great place to sit. 

Likewise, Calgary's new West Eau Claire park with the Peace Bridge is a great place to sit. 

Edmonton's Quarters redevelopment. 

Edmonton's Quarters redevelopment. 

Calgary's massive East Village redevelopment next to the Bow River.

Calgary's massive East Village redevelopment next to the Bow River.

Best For Who?

Fair enough! One can never say something is the “best” as it really depends on each individual’s perspective and interests. While my friends love how Edmonton’s river valley is an escape from the city, I love to embrace the urban experience.  

Perhaps the Canadian thing to do is say both Calgary and Edmonton have great river valley experiences, Calgary’s being more urban while Edmonton’s is more natural.

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Battle of Alberta: Urban Design

Edmonton/Calgary: Let's Plan Together?

Brewery Districts: Calgary vs Edmonton

Inner City Communities: Future = Past?

While many urban planners are quick to criticize Calgary’s inner-city communities for their lack of walkability, I think some rethinking is in order.

Why? Because these communities were built in the ‘50s ‘60s and ‘70s when urban living and homebuyer expectations were very different from those today. 

Also because the future of urban living could look at lot more like the mid-20th century with home delivery of almost all of our everyday needs. 

Wander any Calgary established neighbourhood and you are likely to find several new infill residential developments.  

Wander any Calgary established neighbourhood and you are likely to find several new infill residential developments.  

Walkability

One of the major criticisms of Calgary’s older communities is the lack of walkability to everyday amenities like grocery stores, cafes, drugstores, pubs, restaurants, boutiques and fitness studios.  

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However, back then “essentials” like milk, bread, eggs and butter were often delivered to the home.  

And a corner convenience store also supplied other everyday essentials which often included cigarettes.  

And then there was the Fuller Brush Man and Avon Lady….it was a VERY different time.  

There was no need for organic grocery store or farmers markets - many city dwellers used their mid-century big backyards for their own garden; some even had family or friends living on nearby farms who’d share their big garden harvest.

Marda Loop's farmers' market is just one of the ever increasing number of weekly neighbourhood markets in Calgary. 

Marda Loop's farmers' market is just one of the ever increasing number of weekly neighbourhood markets in Calgary. 

Neighbours often shared the extra tomatoes, cukes and zucchini with those neighbours who didn’t have gardens.

No need for the fancy community garden so popular today.

However, the economics of food distribution, home delivery and corner stores changed dramatically in the ‘70s.  There was also the introduction of the mega-store chain store mentality – grocery stores, drug stores and hardware stores were no longer small, independent neighbourhood stores. 

Ironically, we seem to be returning to mid-century urban living with home delivery of not only of groceries, but almost anything you need. Is marijuana replacing cigarettes? Perhaps we should allow the new marijuana stores to become the new corner store offering all kinds of convenience items.

Is the future of grocery shopping home delivery? 

Is the future of grocery shopping home delivery? 

Home Entertainment

In the middle of the 20thcentury, meeting a friend for coffee didn’t mean going to a trendy café shelling out $4 for a coffee and $3 for a muffin, but rather going to someone’s home for homemade coffee (often instant) and home baked goods.  

So, there was much less of a need for a neighbourhood café.  In fact, even today’s neighbourhood cafés are less a place to meet friends and more a workspace given tiny condos are too small to “live, work and/or play.” 

The same is true for the neighbourhood pub.  When our inner city communities were built, meeting up for a beer or a drink meant going to someone’s home, often to the basement’s rumpus room that had a bar.  Interestingly, there is a return to the basement rumpus room/bar, but now it is called the “media centre.”  

A costly craft beer at a fancy pub with multiple TVs broadcasting sports from around the world didn’t exist when the focus was more local than global.  

Going out to a restaurant for dinner was also not a common activity in the mid 20th century. Rather most families, it was something they did a few times a year, on very special occasions.  

This is why there aren’t a lot of neighbourhood restaurants in our inner-city communities.

Is the patio the new basement? The new back deck? 

Is the patio the new basement? The new back deck? 

Will the next generation of Calgarians be so focused on going out to eat and drink versus eating at home.

Will the next generation of Calgarians be so focused on going out to eat and drink versus eating at home.

Playgrounds & Fitness

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The big mid-century backyards were often used as the children’s playground - two swings, a slide and sand box (maybe even a tree fort in a real tree).

No need for those $250,000+ mega community playgrounds.  

In the winter, someone on the block had a backyard ice rink that everyone used.  There was an elementary school within a 5 to 10-minute walk that provided the neighbourhood playground equipment and playing fields.  No need to duplicate school and community amenities. 

Queen Elizabeth Elementary School playground is just one block away from the West Hillhurst Park playground. 

Queen Elizabeth Elementary School playground is just one block away from the West Hillhurst Park playground. 

Having a local fitness, cycling or yoga studio nearby was also not an issue 60 years ago. I don’t recall my parents or parents of my friends ever working out, doing yoga or wanting to cycle like a maniac to music. Similarly, the need for community fitness centres was non-existent, people were happy with an arena and curling rink nearby. 

Tuesday morning yoga in the park with kids. You would never have seen this in the '60s. 

Tuesday morning yoga in the park with kids. You would never have seen this in the '60s. 

Besides, fitness for men 60 years ago was cutting the grass, gardening and doing odd jobs around the house. It was a time when the workshop was the man cave, a place where Dad could (and needed to) fix and build things.

It is what we now call “active living.” 

And the same for women. The daily tasks, like cooking, cleaning, canning and laundry (which meant taking the clothes outside to dry) was all the fitness they needed.  Hence the adage, “A women’s work is never done!” Especially when the average family was 6+ people. 

Will the current interest in paying to going to a gym continue or will it be a generational fad?  Will parents get tired of driving their kids all over the city for extracurricular activities?  

Will our mega regional recreation centers become a thing of the past as people return to playing on the street, family walks and playing in the neighbourhood park?   

Helicopter Park in West Hillhurst is just one of hundreds of funky new neighbourhood playgrounds in Calgary.    Calgary has something like 1,200 city playgrounds for 185 neighbourhoods and that doesn't include school playgrounds. 

Helicopter Park in West Hillhurst is just one of hundreds of funky new neighbourhood playgrounds in Calgary.  Calgary has something like 1,200 city playgrounds for 185 neighbourhoods and that doesn't include school playgrounds. 

Shopping wasn’t a hobby

There was no need for lots of clothing shops in the mid 20thcentury. Have you seen the tiny closets in those mid-century houses! Moms often sewed dresses for themselves and their daughters. There was less shopping for kid’s clothes “hand-me-downs” came from family and friends. Less of a need for consignment and for thrift stores as well.  

Moms would also repair clothes (I wore a lot of pants with iron-on knee patches) and darn socks with holes in them rather than throw them out. Today’s online shopping is not that much different from the Eaton’s and Sears catalogue shopping in the 50s and 60s.  What is old is new again?

For many the shopping mall is the new Main Street i.e. a place to stroll with friends and doing a little window shopping.

For many the shopping mall is the new Main Street i.e. a place to stroll with friends and doing a little window shopping.

In the early 21st century, the shopping mall became a second living room with soft seating that often exceeds anything we have at home.

In the early 21st century, the shopping mall became a second living room with soft seating that often exceeds anything we have at home.

Saving vs Spending?

Will the next generation realize they could save a lot of money by adopting the home entertainment culture of the ‘50s and ‘60s? By my calculations, a coffee a day cost about $150/month, drinks and/or dinner once a week could cost another $150/month per person, so by entertaining at home you could easily save $250/month which if applied to a mortgage would make inner-city living more affordable.  

Trendy cafes like this one in Banff Trail are popping up in every established neighbourhood.

Trendy cafes like this one in Banff Trail are popping up in every established neighbourhood.

Community Garden vs Backyard Garden

Will the next generation wake up and realize they could have their own garden, thereby saving significant dollars on buying pricey organic food at the farmers’ market?  

This is already starting to happen with Calgary’s plethora of community gardens (there are almost 200 community gardens in Calgary).

A backyard vegetable garden in a mid century house in Parkdale. This garden has existed for decades, it is not a trendy new backyard garden. 

A backyard vegetable garden in a mid century house in Parkdale. This garden has existed for decades, it is not a trendy new backyard garden. 

Parkdale community garden just across the alley from the house in the previous photo.

Parkdale community garden just across the alley from the house in the previous photo.

Death of the grocery store?

Is the mega grocery store destined for extinction, like the department store? soon to become extinct? Sylvain Charlebois, professor in food distribution and policy and associate dean at the College of Management and Economics, University of Guelph said back in 2014 that “the days of the typical grocery store are numbered.” Since then, online grocery store shopping in North America has grown significantly, US online grocery shopping is expected to grow from 7% of the market to 20% by 2025. Amazon’s takeover of Whole Foods in 2017 could well signal the beginning of the end for the mega grocery store. 

Link: Death of grocery store

Link: Why Canada is wary of online grocery shopping.  

Urban grocery store in Bridgeland.

Urban grocery store in Bridgeland.

The same could be true for other bricks and mortar retailers. Department stores have been dying for decades,  Sears being the latest victim.  While some say the death of retail is premature. Warren Buffett says “that in 10 years, the retail industry will look nothing like it does today.” In May 2017, he sold all of his Walmart shares.  Who would bet against Buffett, one of the most successful and respected investors in the world since the 1960s? 

Link: Death of retail as we know it.

Will there be support for a traditional “main street” in the future? The City of Calgary’s planners are currently focused on how to create or enhance 24 traditional main streets in Calgary’s older communities.  Many of Calgary’s new urban villages are planned around an urban grocery store as its anchor.  

One has to wonder - are we planning for the future or the past? 

Link: City of Calgary Main Street Program

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Futurists?

Planners and politicians need to be futurists. They need to envision the future and build a city with a variety of different communities to meet the diverse and changing expectations of its citizens and market.  

Have we replaced the sea of cookie-cutter single-family houses with cookie-cutter town homes and condos?  

Will the master-planned communities being built today, meet the needs of Calgarians 20 years from now when they are fully built-out? 

Brookfield Residential's Livingston is just one example of many new master planned communities that employs 21st century urban design principles for creating mixed-use neighbourhoods at the edge of the city.

Brookfield Residential's Livingston is just one example of many new master planned communities that employs 21st century urban design principles for creating mixed-use neighbourhoods at the edge of the city.

Last Word

Calgary’s inner-city communities are in fact much loved by those who live there today - as they were 50+ years ago. They have not become rundown and undesirable communities like in some cities.   They are an oasis for many Calgarians. Hence, the strong desire to preserve rather than develop them. 

Too much of today’s city building is about imitation - planners, developers and politicians borrowing ideas from other cities without understanding the unique nature of their city.  

Calgary is not Vancouver. Nor is it Toronto or Montreal.  And we are VERY different from European and US cities. 

Calgary’s inner-city communities may not require as much change as many planners think given the return to home delivery for food, clothing and other everyday needs. The UPS and FedEx trucks arrive on my street almost every day; often more than once.  Our everyday needs are being delivered to us, rather than us walking, cycling or driving to pick them up.  

Perhaps we should just let them evolve naturally based on economic, technological and market changes with a dash of good urban design. 

A typical street of mid 20th century homes in West Hillhurst. 

A typical street of mid 20th century homes in West Hillhurst. 

A typical street of new infill homes in West Hillhurst.  These two streets are literally side-by-side. 

A typical street of new infill homes in West Hillhurst.  These two streets are literally side-by-side. 

19th Street NW is a good example of a mid 20th century main street evolving slowly into the 21st century.

19th Street NW is a good example of a mid 20th century main street evolving slowly into the 21st century.

Marda Loop's 33rd & 34th Ave SW are both undergoing mega makeovers with new mixed-use buildings and condos.  

Marda Loop's 33rd & 34th Ave SW are both undergoing mega makeovers with new mixed-use buildings and condos.  

Postcards From Calgary’s Reader Rock Garden 

I can’t believe it took us 25+ years to check out Calgary’s Reader Rock Garden.  In my defense for many years it was more or less abandoned, however that is no excuse. In fact, it would have been fun to explore a deserted overgrown garden.

Enough said!

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Garden & Cemetery

Reader Rock garden first opened in 1913, the brainchild of the City’s Superintendent of Parks, Cemeteries & Recreation (1913 to 1942) William Roland Reader. He lived in a house at the top of the hill just south of Stampede Park, enjoying spectacular views of downtown. 

Over the years, he experimented with upwards of 4,000 different plant species from around the world, many of which ended up in parks across the city, as the City of Calgary’s first nursery was at the base of the gardens. 

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Not Always Rosy

In 2006, it received provincial historical resource designation and this year, 2018, it received national historic designation.  However, things were not always rosy (pun intended). In 1961, maintenance records began to indicate the garden was being neglected, in the ‘70s, trees were being cut down and garden beds removed.  In the ‘80s, the greenhouses were removed for LRT construction.

Then more than two decades later, in 2003, Friends of Reader Rock Garden Society (FoRRGS) was established and in 2004, the garden is fenced off for renovations by volunteers and paid staff.  The garden reopened in 2006, with improvements added each year since then.

Link: Friends of Reader Garden

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Food & Flowers

In addition to the gardens, there is a lovely café in the house at the top of the hill with daily specials (including a pastry special) and a popular Sunday brunch. As well there are special events like the High Tea on Sunday, August 26th 2018 from 3 to 4pm – reservations required.

If you want to bring your own food for a picnic, there are lots of places to have a family or romantic picnic.

Link: Reader’s Garden Café   

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Tips

  • Several historical plaques tell the story of the gardens and the people involved.  It is a mini outdoor history museum as well as a garden.
  • The Garden are not very wheelchair or stroller-friendly.
  • Bring your phone and camera, you will want to take photos.
  • Bring some water if it is going to be hot.
  • Wear good shoes, as there is lots of climbing on rock steps.
  • The Union Cemetery is next to the gardens and makes for some additional strolling and a history lesson as several Calgary pioneers are buried here.
  • Plan on spending one hour exploring the garden, even more if you plan to have something to eat.
  • The Garden is very close to the Erlton LRT Station, or about a 30-minute walk from downtown. 
  • Parking is FREE at the base of the gardens on 25th Ave just east of Macleod Trail.
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Last Word

We spent two hours on a lovely Sunday afternoon strolling the gardens and part of the cemetery.  There is a lovely tranquility in this garden oasis. 

We highly recommend you take visiting family and friends who are in town from May to September.  If they are really into gardens you will also want to take them to see the Silver Springs Botanical Garden and Senator Patrick Burns Rock Gardens.

Everyday Tourist Blog Link: Silver Springs Botanical Garden

Everyday Tourist Blog Link: Senator Patrick Burns Rock Garden

West Hillhurst: Portrait Of My Neighbourhood

West Hillhurst is about a 45 to 90 minute walk to Stephen Avenue depending on where you live and how fast you walk.  It is on the edge of the City Centre by my definition i.e. anywhere that is about a 30 to 40 minute walk from the middle of the Central Business District.  

That makes West Hillhurst an inner-city neighbourhood.

West Hillhurst Park is the heart of not only our neighbourhood but of the entire North Hill district. It has a funky old arena, squash courts, tennis/pickle ball courts, a gym, a day care, seniors' lounge, outdoor swimming pool, community garden, playground and playing fields. It may not be as big or fancy as new recreation centres in the 'burbs but it does the job. It is also home to the The Barn, a quaint pub where you can watch what is happening in the arena.   (photo credit: Ross Aitken Re/Max Real Estate Central)

West Hillhurst Park is the heart of not only our neighbourhood but of the entire North Hill district. It has a funky old arena, squash courts, tennis/pickle ball courts, a gym, a day care, seniors' lounge, outdoor swimming pool, community garden, playground and playing fields. It may not be as big or fancy as new recreation centres in the 'burbs but it does the job. It is also home to the The Barn, a quaint pub where you can watch what is happening in the arena. (photo credit: Ross Aitken Re/Max Real Estate Central)

Hidden diversity

For most Calgarians, the image of inner-city neighbourhoods is one of tree-lined streets with a mix of small, mid-20th century bungalows and large new two story infill homes.  There might be an old school or two and a small shopping plaza and but not much else.

Living in West Hillhurst for 25+ years I have come to appreciate the hidden diversity of my community, which I expect  is true for many other inner-city neighbourhoods in Calgary.

Let's go for a West Hillhurst adventure, as my four and two-year old neighbour boys would say when they want me to take them for a walkabout of our neighbourhood. We always find something new even after over 100 adventures.

West Hillhurst has strange boundaries. It would seem more logical for the boundary to extend to 29th St on the west and 14th Street on the east? Note the south boundary includes the southern shore of the Bow River, which means we have some great beaches and pathways. 

West Hillhurst has strange boundaries. It would seem more logical for the boundary to extend to 29th St on the west and 14th Street on the east? Note the south boundary includes the southern shore of the Bow River, which means we have some great beaches and pathways. 

A map from the early 20th century illustrates how the boundaries and names of the neighourhoods have changed.  I love the name Parkdale Happyland, perhaps we should bring it back.  

A map from the early 20th century illustrates how the boundaries and names of the neighourhoods have changed.  I love the name Parkdale Happyland, perhaps we should bring it back.  

Parks & Recreation Amenities 

A Sunday morning church picnic at Grand Trunk Park attracts all ages and backgrounds.

A Sunday morning church picnic at Grand Trunk Park attracts all ages and backgrounds.

We have great climbing trees, who needs climbing walls?

We have great climbing trees, who needs climbing walls?

Our outdoor pool is a great gathering place in the summer. 

Our outdoor pool is a great gathering place in the summer. 

The Bowview field is one of the best soccer field in the city and attracts some of the best soccer players in the city. 

The Bowview field is one of the best soccer field in the city and attracts some of the best soccer players in the city. 

We also have numerous other soccer fields for those learning the game. 

We also have numerous other soccer fields for those learning the game. 

Helicopter Park is one of the most popular parks in the City.  The name comes from the fact that the STARS helicopter takes off and lands at the nearby Foothill Medical Centre.  West Hillhurst has five funky playgrounds, in addition to school playgrounds.

Helicopter Park is one of the most popular parks in the City.  The name comes from the fact that the STARS helicopter takes off and lands at the nearby Foothill Medical Centre.  West Hillhurst has five funky playgrounds, in addition to school playgrounds.

We have some of the best dressed playground Dad's in the city. 

We have some of the best dressed playground Dad's in the city. 

We even have our own stretch of the Bow River, with our own islands.  

We even have our own stretch of the Bow River, with our own islands.  

We have several lovely natural pebble beaches. 

We have several lovely natural pebble beaches. 

Our pathways are amazing.

Our pathways are amazing.

Our dog park is busy year-round. It offers great views of the downtown skyline.

Our dog park is busy year-round. It offers great views of the downtown skyline.

We have several outdoor skating rinks in the winter, like this one that is shared by hockey players and figure skaters. 

We have several outdoor skating rinks in the winter, like this one that is shared by hockey players and figure skaters. 

We even have our own luge/bobsled track. 

We even have our own luge/bobsled track. 

West Hillhursters love to cycle. While we don't have any cycle tracks we do have the highest number of people cycling to work of any neighbourhood in Calgary.  We start them young! 

West Hillhursters love to cycle. While we don't have any cycle tracks we do have the highest number of people cycling to work of any neighbourhood in Calgary.  We start them young! 

West Hillhurst's multi-use courts are use for both tennis and pickle ball. Inside is a very popular squash club.  

West Hillhurst's multi-use courts are use for both tennis and pickle ball. Inside is a very popular squash club.  

Caring Community 

Centre 2507 operated by the Calgary Drop-In Centre is a safe place for homeless to sleep. 

Centre 2507 operated by the Calgary Drop-In Centre is a safe place for homeless to sleep. 

The mega Bethany Care Centre is located at the NE edge of the neighbourhood.

The mega Bethany Care Centre is located at the NE edge of the neighbourhood.

The Louise Dean Centre (formerly the Kensington School) is for young moms with children. 

The Louise Dean Centre (formerly the Kensington School) is for young moms with children. 

Crowchild Kiwanis Manor is just one of several senior care facilities in our community. 

Crowchild Kiwanis Manor is just one of several senior care facilities in our community. 

The Parkdale Kiwanis Manor is located across the street from the Crowchild Manor above. Don't let the name fool you, it is located in West Hillhurst. 

The Parkdale Kiwanis Manor is located across the street from the Crowchild Manor above. Don't let the name fool you, it is located in West Hillhurst. 

Bow view Apartments is owned by Highbanks Society. It provides shelter and access to education and resources for single moms 16 to 24 years old.  The Dairy Lane operating since 1950, is Calgary's iconic diner. They make a classic milkshake. 

Bow view Apartments is owned by Highbanks Society. It provides shelter and access to education and resources for single moms 16 to 24 years old.  The Dairy Lane operating since 1950, is Calgary's iconic diner. They make a classic milkshake. 

Churches

The West Hillhurst Gospel Hall is where Paul Brandt began singing as a child.

The West Hillhurst Gospel Hall is where Paul Brandt began singing as a child.

West Hillhurst has several churches but you might miss them as they often look like houses.  This is the Faith Chapel of Hillhurst. 

West Hillhurst has several churches but you might miss them as they often look like houses.  This is the Faith Chapel of Hillhurst. 

This is the Parkdale Seventh Day Adventist Church, but it really is in West Hillhurst.

This is the Parkdale Seventh Day Adventist Church, but it really is in West Hillhurst.

Parkdale Grace Fellowship is also located in West Hillhurst. 

Parkdale Grace Fellowship is also located in West Hillhurst. 

Architecture

The Girl Guide of Canada building design has a funky juxtaposition of traditional and contemporary elements and materials.

The Girl Guide of Canada building design has a funky juxtaposition of traditional and contemporary elements and materials.

We have a very cool curvaceous white pedestrian bridge by a "no name" designer. Ours goes over a river of cars not water, but otherwise it is just as beautiful as those famous ones down the road. 

We have a very cool curvaceous white pedestrian bridge by a "no name" designer. Ours goes over a river of cars not water, but otherwise it is just as beautiful as those famous ones down the road. 

The Dave Freeze pedestrian bridge does cross the Bow River underneath the Crowchild Trail bridge.  Backstory: This bridge cost the City nothing as Dave an avid walker paid for it as a gift to Calgarians.  It was designed I believe pro bono by Calgary architect Bill Milne, a good friend of Dave.   

The Dave Freeze pedestrian bridge does cross the Bow River underneath the Crowchild Trail bridge.  Backstory: This bridge cost the City nothing as Dave an avid walker paid for it as a gift to Calgarians.  It was designed I believe pro bono by Calgary architect Bill Milne, a good friend of Dave.   

The Lions Village our newest seniors complex, by NORR combines an industrial and contemporary look, which is fitting as it is located next to a major ENMAX transformer.    

The Lions Village our newest seniors complex, by NORR combines an industrial and contemporary look, which is fitting as it is located next to a major ENMAX transformer.    

The Kensington Clinic (abortion) designed by Caglary architect Andrew King is emblematic of minimalist modern architecture.  Backstory: The area around Crowchild Trail and 5th Avenue NW has been home to an abortion clinic for decades . 

The Kensington Clinic (abortion) designed by Caglary architect Andrew King is emblematic of minimalist modern architecture.  Backstory: The area around Crowchild Trail and 5th Avenue NW has been home to an abortion clinic for decades

This round mid-century building is currently being converted into a medical facility.

This round mid-century building is currently being converted into a medical facility.

The Grand Trunk School built in 1911 is one of the oldest buildings in Calgary outside of the downtown. 

The Grand Trunk School built in 1911 is one of the oldest buildings in Calgary outside of the downtown. 

 West Hillhurst is also home to the Thomas Riley House built in 1910.  Backstory: It was sold for $1 in 1987, as it had to be moved from its original 24th Street and 7th Avenue NW location to allow for the widening of Crowchild Trail.  Today it is hidden in the back alley of 8th Ave and 28th St NW.     FYI: At one time it was an abortion clinic!

 West Hillhurst is also home to the Thomas Riley House built in 1910.  Backstory: It was sold for $1 in 1987, as it had to be moved from its original 24th Street and 7th Avenue NW location to allow for the widening of Crowchild Trail.  Today it is hidden in the back alley of 8th Ave and 28th St NW.    FYI: At one time it was an abortion clinic!

Small Businesses 

19th Street NW, West Hillhurst's main street is undergoing a renaissance with new shops like Made by Marcus Ice Cream. 

19th Street NW, West Hillhurst's main street is undergoing a renaissance with new shops like Made by Marcus Ice Cream. 

The Daylight Grocery store has been operating for over 50 years. 

The Daylight Grocery store has been operating for over 50 years. 

If you are a camper or a hiker, you probably know about SA Meat Shops as their dried meats are very popular. SA provides a range of meat products, baked goods and grocery items unique to South Africa. We also have Jan's Meats & Deli, an authentic Polish Market offering fresh meats, specialty cheeses and other groceries. I am in love with the apple strudel. 

If you are a camper or a hiker, you probably know about SA Meat Shops as their dried meats are very popular. SA provides a range of meat products, baked goods and grocery items unique to South Africa. We also have Jan's Meats & Deli, an authentic Polish Market offering fresh meats, specialty cheeses and other groceries. I am in love with the apple strudel. 

The Scout Shop is a hidden gem for campers.  I am told they have great deals on tents.  Fashionistas love their collection of badges.  

The Scout Shop is a hidden gem for campers.  I am told they have great deals on tents.  Fashionistas love their collection of badges.  

The new Kensington Legion building combines an neighbourhood restaurant with a Legion lounge and office space. It is the first phase of a mega redevelopment of the Kensington Legion site, that will create a mix-use hub at the corner of Kensington Road and 19th St NW.  It is also an example of West Hillhurst's new architectural renaissance.

The new Kensington Legion building combines an neighbourhood restaurant with a Legion lounge and office space. It is the first phase of a mega redevelopment of the Kensington Legion site, that will create a mix-use hub at the corner of Kensington Road and 19th St NW.  It is also an example of West Hillhurst's new architectural renaissance.

West Hillhust is full of small businesses like this one that are integrated into the community.   

West Hillhust is full of small businesses like this one that are integrated into the community.   

District Ventures is an accelerator for start-ups in the food and agricultural sector.   

District Ventures is an accelerator for start-ups in the food and agricultural sector.  

Vintage Cafe is one of the many new small businesses in West Hillhurst. They recently opened a second store in Cross Iron Mills.

Vintage Cafe is one of the many new small businesses in West Hillhurst. They recently opened a second store in Cross Iron Mills.

St. Lawrence Bagels opened recently at 2638 Parkdale Drive with a wood burning oven.  The owner/baker spent 10+ years working at Montreal's iconic St. Viateur Bagel Shop. 

St. Lawrence Bagels opened recently at 2638 Parkdale Drive with a wood burning oven.  The owner/baker spent 10+ years working at Montreal's iconic St. Viateur Bagel Shop. 

Amato Gelato is one of many pedestrian oriented shops along Kensington Road.

Amato Gelato is one of many pedestrian oriented shops along Kensington Road.

We even have some back alley industries . 

We even have some back alley industries

Art & Culture

Artists make good use of our pebble beaches to create very interesting installations. 

Artists make good use of our pebble beaches to create very interesting installations. 

We don't have any museums but we do have this very interesting gate .

We don't have any museums but we do have this very interesting gate.

We do have a big angry cat scultpure? 

We do have a big angry cat scultpure? 

We have lots of little libraries. 

We have lots of little libraries. 

We might not have a giant blue ring, but we have lots of little gnomes. 

We might not have a giant blue ring, but we have lots of little gnomes. 

We also have a classic sculpture garden.

We also have a classic sculpture garden.

We are also adding to Calgary's growing number of murals/street art. 

We are also adding to Calgary's growing number of murals/street art. 

We also have a cow from the Udderly Art project. 

We also have a cow from the Udderly Art project. 

Diversity of Housing

Modern rental apartments.

Modern rental apartments.

Mid century rental apartments

Mid century rental apartments

New infills come in all shapes and sizes, from modern to traditional.  

New infills come in all shapes and sizes, from modern to traditional. 

New townhomes.

New townhomes.

Post war homes are still abundant in West Hillhurst. 

Post war homes are still abundant in West Hillhurst. 

Gradually the community is transitioning to early 20th century infills to accommodate more families. 

Gradually the community is transitioning to early 20th century infills to accommodate more families. 

We are seeing more and more lane homes being built in West Hillhurst.

We are seeing more and more lane homes being built in West Hillhurst.

We also have walk-up row housing. 

We also have walk-up row housing. 

Future

Crowfoot Trail Divide? Crowfoot Trail divides West Hillhurst in half - east and west.  Many people think the west half is in Parkdale. It is currently undergoing a mega makeover that will hopefully be more pedestrian, cycling and driver friendly.

Crowfoot Trail Divide? Crowfoot Trail divides West Hillhurst in half - east and west.  Many people think the west half is in Parkdale. It is currently undergoing a mega makeover that will hopefully be more pedestrian, cycling and driver friendly.

The old Kensington Legion is gone, soon to be replaced by a mid-rise condo with main floor retail.  This will be a game changer for our community. 

The old Kensington Legion is gone, soon to be replaced by a mid-rise condo with main floor retail. This will be a game changer for our community. 

Hope you had a great day exploring West Hillhurst with me.

Hope you had a great day exploring West Hillhurst with me.

Best Calgary Neighbourhoods?

Recently, Avenue Magazine published their Calgary Best Neighbourhoods for 2018 and the results were surprising. The methodology involved surveying Calgarians re: what is important to them (restaurants, cafes and bars, walk and transit scores, community engagement, crime rates and access to parks, pathways and recreational opportunities) and then all 185 neighbourhoods were ranked based on relevant data from various sources.

This was not a popularity contest as is often the case with neighbourhood rankings. 

Link: Avenue Best Neighbourhoods Methodology

The top ten were:

  1. Beltline
  2. Arbour Lake
  3. Hamptons
  4. Signal Hill
  5. Bowness
  6. Edgemont
  7. Crescent Heights
  8. Brentwood
  9. Eau Claire
  10. Downtown

Interestingly, Hillhurst ranked #27 and Inglewood #50, both of which have been ranked as some of the best neighbourhoods in Canada by professional planners.  Hmmmm....what does that say? 

West Hillhurst was ranked #105, just ahead of Collingwood (106), North Glenmore Park (107) and Midnapore (108) and behind the likes of Glendale (102), Southview (103) and Britanna (104).

Everybody knows what makes a great neighbourhood is having great neighbours. These are mine.

Everybody knows what makes a great neighbourhood is having great neighbours. These are mine.

Last Word

For me is having great neighbours, which we have had for the entire 25+ years we have lived here.  It is also about great accessibility to all of the things like to do, some in walking distance, some just a 5 or 10 minute drive.  We have never been big transit users.

I am not about to question why West Hillhurst was ranked so low.  But, perhaps it is because what makes a great neighbourhood isn't really measurable.  It is personal! 

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Woodbine is wonderful!

Mount Royal: City Beautiful

Aspen Woods: Home to Calgary's "Nouveau Riche"

Shane Homes Rocky Ridge YMCA Gone Wild?

I promised myself that this summer I would be a tourist in my own city and explore beyond Calgary’s City Centre.  Having heard great things about the new recreation centre in Rocky Ridge and seeing the amazing computer rendering I decide to check it out one day after golf. 

It is literally at the edge of the City.  And it didn't disappoint!

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Futuristic?

It is nestled into the base of a hill, looking like some strange spaceship has landed or a slithering alien creature is about to invade the city.  Its curvaceous shape and rich bronze façade is in sharp contrast to the cheap big box stores facades and the hard edges of the houses, condos and other buildings in the surrounding communities.  

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New Kid On The Block

Move over National Music Centre and the new Central Library there is a new kid in town when it comes to iconic public building architecture.  And it was designed by Calgary’s own GEC architects, not by some international firm.

FYI: GEC also designed the Saddledome one of Calgary other iconic buildings.  

The 284,000 square foot building opened in January 2018 at a cost of $192 million.  The City of Calgary paid for the building and the YMCA is the operator.   Shane Homes paid $3.5 million for naming rights.  It is designed to server the 150,000 people living in the new communities at the northwest edge of the city.  

It is the largest Y in the world, at least for the rest of this year. The   new 333,000 square foot SETON Y is scheduled to open in January 2019. 

 

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Flock by Team of Haddad/Design is one of two public artworks planned for the site.  

Flock by Team of Haddad/Design is one of two public artworks planned for the site.  

Calgary's National Music Centre

Calgary's National Music Centre

Calgary's new central library is the white building on the left. 

Calgary's new central library is the white building on the left. 

Amazing Amenities

  • 25-metre, 8 lane competition pool
  • Spectator viewing area
  • Leisure pool with a wave system and waterslide
  • Hot tubs and steam room
  • 1 multi-purpose ice rink
  • 1 leisure ice surface
  • 3 full gymnasiums with multi-purpose flooring
  • Fitness centre with cardio and strength training equipment
  • Fitness/aerobics studios
  • 160-metre running/walking track
  • Large and small rooms for use as studios, classrooms and meeting spaces
  • 3,000 sq. ft. library with access to print and digital materials, hold pick up, public seating and study space
  • Art making, studio and gallery space
  • 250-seat theatre
  • Childcare/child-minding
  • Food services
  • Physiotherapy/medical clinic
  • Outdoor basketball court
  • Pathways and nature trails/interpretative
  • Outdoor play structures
  • Skateboard park (completion in summer 2018)
  •  
  • Video: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/calgary-rocky-ridge-ymca-1.4517102
The pool gets so busy some days they have to turn people away. 

The pool gets so busy some days they have to turn people away. 

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This is the library which was unmanned when I was there? Interesting open concept and honour system? 

This is the library which was unmanned when I was there? Interesting open concept and honour system? 

Iconic Entrance

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I love how these benches echo the colour and shape of the exterior.  

I love how these benches echo the colour and shape of the exterior.  

Last Word 

Calgary’s love their recreational activities. Shane Homes YMCA @ Rocky Ridge sold 9,700 memberships in its first two weeks.   I was there at about 3 pm on a Wednesday in the middle of Stampede and the place was busy.  I can only imagine how busy it will be in the winter, when there are fewer outdoor options.

This new YCWA is one of four new recreation centers built by the City of Calgary over the past few years, the others being Great Plans (designed by the Calgary’s MTA architecture and Toronto's MJMA), Remington YMCA @ Quarry Park (also designed by GEC) and the futuristic looking SETON YMCA (designed by Calgary’s Gibbs Gage architecture).  

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The total cost of all four recreation centres totalled $480 million. And, yes each came with a public art project, which could be the subject of a future blog.

While Calgarians living in the City Centre are getting a signature library and museum, the suburbs are getting signature recreation centres. All with iconic architecture, no cookie cutter boxes anymore. 

At $675 per square foot, some say it is easy to create an iconic building, the challenge should be to create great architecture with a more modest building. This too could be the subject of a future blog. Stay tuned!

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Urban Design: Does Anybody Really Care?

Calgary's Audacious New Central Library

National Music Museum: The Red Flag

Calgary: Saturday Afternoon Bike Ride Fun

I love Calgary’s summers – warm days, cool evenings, no humidity, no bugs and big blue skies.

What’s not to love? 

River surfing on the Bow River at the 10th St Wave is not easy....but fun to watch!

River surfing on the Bow River at the 10th St Wave is not easy....but fun to watch!

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46 Minutes Took 4 Hours

Last Saturday, I took a bike ride to enjoy Calgary’s great urban outdoors along the south shore of the beautiful Bow River, to check out the reopened Harvie Passage.

 It was a lovely ride - along the way I encountered the Nat Christie sculpture park, Shaw Millennium Park, Eau Claire Promenade, Prince’s Island Park, Eau Claire Plaza, Sien Lok Park, Riverwalk, East Village Plaza, St. Patrick’s Island, Fort Calgary Park, Calgary Zoo on St. George’s Island, Harvie Passage, Bow Habitat Station and Inglewood Bird Sanctuary.  I am sure I missed something.

It is a 7-km ride that Google Maps says should take 23 minutes each way - it took me four hours round trip. 

Here’s why:

The Eau Claire Plaza and the bridge to Prince's Island is still the most popular spot along the Bow River pathway from 14th St. bridge to Harvie Passage.

The Eau Claire Plaza and the bridge to Prince's Island is still the most popular spot along the Bow River pathway from 14th St. bridge to Harvie Passage.

The new West Eau Claire park is a great place to sit, chat and catch some rays.

The new West Eau Claire park is a great place to sit, chat and catch some rays.

The Centre Street Bridge provides a sense of history, as well as a great view of the Bow River and city skyline.

The Centre Street Bridge provides a sense of history, as well as a great view of the Bow River and city skyline.

The Simmons Building in East Village is a popular gathering place as it is home to cafe and bakery. There is also a lovely roof-top patio. 

The Simmons Building in East Village is a popular gathering place as it is home to cafe and bakery. There is also a lovely roof-top patio. 

There is public art scattered all along the Bow River's edge, including this one that has become home to nesting pair of Osprey. 

There is public art scattered all along the Bow River's edge, including this one that has become home to nesting pair of Osprey. 

Found this lovely playground in Inglewood as the pathway winds its way through some century-old streets with large and small century homes and new infills. 

Found this lovely playground in Inglewood as the pathway winds its way through some century-old streets with large and small century homes and new infills. 

Shaw Millennium Park

Millennium Park combines a mega skate park, with a concert bowl, basketball courts and beach volleyball. 

Millennium Park combines a mega skate park, with a concert bowl, basketball courts and beach volleyball. 

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Harvie Passage Fun

Harvie Passage has both a Class 2 and Class 3 rapids for public use. 

  • Eastern (river left) passage: This is considered a Class 3 passage. This passage should not be used by inexperienced or less-experienced boaters as the risk is significant. Experienced boaters should still exercise caution while navigating this passage.
  • Western (river right) passage: This is a Class 2 passage. The waters are slower moving; however, caution is still required when navigating through this passage.

There are also opportunities for less-experiences boaters to exit the river before the passage and portage the major water features.

Additional benefits of the project include the new shoreline spaces along the passage that have been developed for people wishing to enjoy the beauty of the Bow River from land. There are tree-lined walkways and pebble beach areas for the public. 

The passage recently opened up after being destroyed by the 2013 flood. 

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Kids love climbing on Lorna Jordan's artwork that reminds me of a log jam in the river.  I am thinking all public art should be designed in a way that kids can climb on them or at least so people can touch it.  

Kids love climbing on Lorna Jordan's artwork that reminds me of a log jam in the river.  I am thinking all public art should be designed in a way that kids can climb on them or at least so people can touch it.  

Just a few meters inland from Harvie Passage is the Bow Station Habitat which has a free fishing pond for kids.  I didn't see anyone catch anything but there were some very big trout in the pond. 

Just a few meters inland from Harvie Passage is the Bow Station Habitat which has a free fishing pond for kids.  I didn't see anyone catch anything but there were some very big trout in the pond. 

Bow River Living

Since the mid '90s new condos have been completed every few years along the Bow River from West Downtown to East Village. It is hard to believe that in the mid 20th century the Bow River's shoreline was almost completely ignored as a place to live and play - both Eau Claire and East Village were best known for their prostitute strolls. 

Bow River looking east with West Downtown condos in the foreground.  The white dome is the old planetarium/science centre which will be converted into a contemporary art gallery hopefully by next year. 

Bow River looking east with West Downtown condos in the foreground.  The white dome is the old planetarium/science centre which will be converted into a contemporary art gallery hopefully by next year. 

Bow River looking west with condos lining the shore and office towers in the background.  

Bow River looking west with condos lining the shore and office towers in the background. 

Those living along the River enjoy some spectacular sunsets. 

Those living along the River enjoy some spectacular sunsets. 

The ever changing Bow River is a very cool place summer or winter.

The ever changing Bow River is a very cool place summer or winter.

Last Word

This ride confirmed my view that Calgary has ONE of the best and most unique urban river edges in the world. I love the fact that it has three outdoor concert venues, while at the same time has numerous lovely places to be alone and just sit and relax.  I love that it is a place where locals of all ages and means can bike, skate, board, fish, surf, float and paddle. It is an urban recreational paradise.  

Yes some cities might have more touristy restaurants, bars and hotels, including floating ones along their river, but I love the fact our river isn’t “tarted-up” for tourists. 

And it is getting better every year!

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

East Village: A Billion Dollar Work of Art!

A brief history of the Bow River Islands

Calgary: Canada's Bike Friendly City

Calgary’s City Centre: One Of North America’s Best?

Ever since the Calgary Herald published my column “Does Calgary Have The World’s Most Walkable City Centre?” in March, I have been criticized by some urbanists for being a “Calgary cheerleader” who sees my city with rose-coloured glasses. 

Link: Does Calgary have the most walkable City Centre in the world?

Brent Toderian, a former City of Calgary Planner for our City Centre, then Director of Planning for Vancouver and now an international planning consultant even asked his 49,000 Twitter followers “What in their opinion is the most walkable City Centre in the world?” As one would expect cities like Paris, Barcelona and Melbourne topped the list and Calgary wasn’t included. No surprise Calgary flies under the radar for national and international urbanists.

Rainbow underpass pathway

Rainbow underpass pathway

The Chinese Cultural Centre is an architectural gem.

The Chinese Cultural Centre is an architectural gem.

Calgary’s City Centre is very cool

Over the past few months I have posted a number of blogs on my everydaytourist.ca website documenting why Calgary’s major City Centre communities, i.e. Beltline, Bridgeland, Downtown, Inglewood, Kensington and Mission, are all very cool places to live, play and visit. 

In each blog, I documented how over the past decade or two, our City Center with the addition of dozens of new condo complexes and thousands of new infill homes, improved public spaces, new festivals, as well as new shops, restaurants, cafes and pubs has evolved to be on par or better than what other North American cities.  These blogs were also dismissed by some national and international urbanists as simply “cheerleading.”

Here is why I think “Calgary’s City Centre is one of the best in North America” and perhaps the BEST for any city with a population under two million people.  The rationale is not based on stats and figures, but on decades of personal observation of various key elements of urban vitality in dozens of cities in North America and Europe.

Gotta love this life-size Victor Cicansky chair at the Glenbow Museum. I have a much smaller version with a potato! 

Gotta love this life-size Victor Cicansky chair at the Glenbow Museum. I have a much smaller version with a potato! 

Shopping 

Very few City Centers in North America under two million people still have major department stores and shopping centres. Calgary boasts three department stores – Hudson’s Bay, Holts and Simons and The Core, Bankers’ Hall and Scotia Center combine to create one of the largest indoor shopping malls of any City Centre in North America. 

Our City Centre is also blessed with six major pedestrian streets (Main Streets) – Stephen Avenue, 4th St SW, 10th St NW, Kensington Road, 9th Ave SE and 17th Ave SW, as well as, four secondary ones – First St SW, 11th St SW, 11th Ave SW (Design District) and 1st Ave NE (Bridgeland).  Most City Centres are lucky to have two or three.

It also has four major grocery stores – Safeway (Kensington, Connaught and Mission), as well as Midtown Co-op.  In addition, Sunterra (Victoria Park), Community Natural Foods (Beltline), Bite (Inglewood), Sunnyside Organic Market and Bridgeland Market, Luke’s Drug Mart and Blush Lane Organic Market (both in Bridgeland) serve as niche grocers. And, while Calgary doesn’t have a year-round central market, we do have weekly summer markets in Hillhurst and Bridgeland. 

The Core shopping centre's skylight is impressive as are the shops, if only they could get the public garden to stop leaking.  

The Core shopping centre's skylight is impressive as are the shops, if only they could get the public garden to stop leaking.  

Calgary's City Centre has lots of pedestrian oriented streets. 

Calgary's City Centre has lots of pedestrian oriented streets. 

17th Ave aka Red Mile is a mix of retail, restaurant and residential buildings of all sizes and shapes. 

17th Ave aka Red Mile is a mix of retail, restaurant and residential buildings of all sizes and shapes. 

It also has great places to browse. 

It also has great places to browse. 

Calgary's City Centre as several large grocery stores, as well as several boutique ones. 

Calgary's City Centre as several large grocery stores, as well as several boutique ones. 

Keynote combines a market, cafe, liquor store with an office tower and two residential towers.

Keynote combines a market, cafe, liquor store with an office tower and two residential towers.

Coffee Culture

Calgary has had a strong independent coffee culture long before Starbucks was even thought of.  Kensington has been home to two independent coffee houses - Higher Ground and the Roasterie since the ‘80s.  Café Beano has been a hipster hangout since before the term hipster was popularized in the 21st century.  Mission’s Purple Perk has also been around for decades.

Recently, a plethora of Calgary-based coffee houses have invaded the City Centre – Alforno, Analog, Gravity, Monogram, Phil & Sebastian, Rosso and Vendome to name a few.  Indeed, you are never far from a café in Calgary’s City Centre.

There are literally new coffee shops popping up ever month.  This one is in the a-mazing 20 km indoor +15 pedestrian system. 

There are literally new coffee shops popping up ever month.  This one is in the a-mazing 20 km indoor +15 pedestrian system. 

Cafe Beano a Calgary landmark.

Cafe Beano a Calgary landmark.

Restaurants

Like most North American cities, the restaurant scene has exploded in Calgary’s City Centre over the past 20+ years.  EnRoute Magazine’s list of top new Canadian restaurants list has routinely included one or more Calgary City Centre restaurants including Bar Von Der Fels (2017), while Pigeon Hole was ranked their “The Best New Restaurant” in Canada (2015).

John Gilchrist, Calgary Herald food and restaurant writer and author of “My Favourite Restaurants Calgary and Banff,” had 49 favourite restaurants in downtown alone and over 150 in the City Center in his last book.  He points out Calgary’s City Centre offers both upscale dining -Teatro, Blink and Charcut – as well as many ethnic dining spots – Falafel King, Pure and Jonas. Gilchrist also notes Calgary’s Chinatown is small, but has some great dim sum spots, and Stephen Avenue has an abundance of pubs and restaurant patios. 

It doesn't get much better than al fresco dining on Stephen Avenue under the Bay's colonnade. 

It doesn't get much better than al fresco dining on Stephen Avenue under the Bay's colonnade. 

If you are into funky places Re:Grub where you can dine in a barrel...how appropriate is that. 

If you are into funky places Re:Grub where you can dine in a barrel...how appropriate is that. 

Patio dining on the river is always an option.

Patio dining on the river is always an option.

Art & Architecture

Over the past two decades, Calgary has upped its game when it comes to urban design. Calgary’s City Centre boasts a major office tower by Norman Foster (The Bow), a mixed office/residential tower by Bjarke Ingles (Telus Sky), a bridge by Santiago Calatrava that is unlike any other he has designed (Peace Bridge) and an iconic new Central Library by Sinohetta. There is also Pickard Chilton’s two tower Eighth Avenue Place and London’s Arney Fender Katsalidis Brookfield Place office tower, both featuring cathedral-like public lobbies. 

BIG's Telus Sky but it is quickly becoming known as The Twist. Can't wait to see Douglas Coupland's light show on the side of the building.  

BIG's Telus Sky but it is quickly becoming known as The Twist. Can't wait to see Douglas Coupland's light show on the side of the building. 

Stephen Avenue an eclectic mix of shops, office towers, pubic art and architecture (both old and new).

Stephen Avenue an eclectic mix of shops, office towers, pubic art and architecture (both old and new).

Calgary also has an early SOM architects residential tower (Eau Claire 500 built in 1979) and a new SOM office tower (707 Fifth Street, built in 2017). SOM, one of the largest and most influential architecture, interior design, engineering, and urban planning firms in the world designed the iconic Birj in Dubai, the tallest building in the world.

When it comes to public art, Calgary boasts 100+ artworks in its City Centre including “Wonderland” by internationally acclaimed artist Jaume Plensa. Some of Calgary’s best public art is by local artists like Ron Moppett’s huge mosaic “THESAMEWAYBETTER/READER” made up of 956,321 tiny glass tiles and Joe Fafard’s stampeding horses titled “Do Re Me Fa Sol La Si Do.”  

New public artworks are being installed almost monthly. 

New public artworks are being installed almost monthly. 

Giving Wings to the Dream, Doug Driediger, east wall of old CUPS building on 100 block of 7th Ave SE. This mural has held up well given it is 20+ years old.  Again I like the fact the piece relates to the site, which was home to Calgary Urban Projects Society (helping people in need) when it was first commissioned. I think it talks nicely about Calgary as a caring city. 

Giving Wings to the Dream, Doug Driediger, east wall of old CUPS building on 100 block of 7th Ave SE. This mural has held up well given it is 20+ years old.  Again I like the fact the piece relates to the site, which was home to Calgary Urban Projects Society (helping people in need) when it was first commissioned. I think it talks nicely about Calgary as a caring city. 

Calgary also has a budding street art culture. This piece "Eyes on the Street" was done by a teenager who lives in the Hillhurst/Sunnyside community. 

Calgary also has a budding street art culture. This piece "Eyes on the Street" was done by a teenager who lives in the Hillhurst/Sunnyside community. 

Calgary’s City Center is also home to many historical buildings including dozens of early 20th Century sandstone buildings. Stephen Avenue is a designated National Historic Site with its collection of early 20th century buildings.  Atlantic Avenue aka 9th Avenue SE - Calgary’s original main street - also has an important collection of early 20th century brick buildings. Other important historical sites include the Lougheed House with the Beaulieu Garden, Reader Rock Gardens and Senator Burns Rock Gardens.

When it comes to the arts, Arts Commons is one of the larger performing arts centres in North America (3,200 seats in 5 performance spaces), Glenbow is one of Canada’s largest museums and Lunchbox Theatre is longest running noon-hour theatre in North America.  There is also Theatre Junction Grand and Decidedly Jazz dance studio offering diverse programming while two arthouse cinemas – The Globe and Plaza offer alternative and main stream films. Yes, I know we don’t have a major contemporary art gallery -  you can’t have everything!

The Glenbow has developed a very insightful curatorial program linking past and present. 

The Glenbow has developed a very insightful curatorial program linking past and present. 

Public Spaces

Calgary’s City Centre boast an impressive best collection of parks - from the 100+ year old Memorial Park to the new St. Patrick’s Island park complete with pebble beach. Few City Centres can boast a park with an active cricket pitch (Riley Park) or one with a family toboggan hill (Murdoch Park).  Prince’s Island has been called one of the best music festival sites by many Calgary International Folk Festival performers.  

And then there is Stampede Park. It hosts not only “The Greatest Outdoor Show On Earth” but also is home to a major arena (hockey, lacrosse, ice shows and concerts), a major trade and convention facility as well as numerous other buildings that host hundreds of events year-round.

When it comes to pathways, Calgary’s Bow River promenade from 14th Street Bridge to Fort Calgary is truly in a class of its own.  The enhancement of the West Eau Claire section of the promenade this year will make it truly one of the great urban strolls in North America. 

The +15 system with its 60+ bridges connecting 100+ buildings helps make our City Centre one of the most walkable in the world.  Not only does it make walking more attractive in poor weather, but it also means you can walk without worrying about crazy drivers and cyclists.

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Calgary's Olympic Plaza is a colourful oasis in the summer.  

Calgary's Olympic Plaza is a colourful oasis in the summer.  

Chillin' on Riverwalk in East Village.

Chillin' on Riverwalk in East Village.

containR Park in Hillhurst Sunnyside is home to numerous planned and unplanned events. 

containR Park in Hillhurst Sunnyside is home to numerous planned and unplanned events. 

Fitness/Recreational Opportunities

The Repsol Sports Centre, opened in 1983, is one of the busiest recreation centers in North America today. It is interesting to note its pure white translucent Teflon roof – shaped like a turtle - predates the current obsession for creating strange-shaped public buildings by 20 years. 

Shaw Millennium Skateboard Park is not only one of the largest free public skate parks in the world, but also offers beach volleyball and basketball courts.  Haultain Park has a tennis courts, a playing field and popular children’s playground. 

The Bow River pathway system is a very popular running route morning, noon and night, evenings and weekends year round. 

The City Centre is also home to dozens of private fitness centers and yoga studios including the busy Eau Claire Y.

Calgarians are good at improvising when it comes to recreational infrastructure. 

Calgarians are good at improvising when it comes to recreational infrastructure. 

Family fun in downtown.

Family fun in downtown.

Pubs & Clubs 

Calgary, has a budding music scene with Mikey’s, Ironwood, Palomino and Blues Can offering live music seven days a week.  The new National Music Centre with the King Eddy enhances Calgary claim to be North America’s next music city.

Every Calgary City Centre community has its signature pub, from James Joyce on Stephen Avenue to Kensington Pub in Kensington, as well as the Ship & Anchor to Trolley Five on 17th Ave SW. 

The Ironwood Stage & Grill is just one of several music venues in the City Centre. 

The Ironwood Stage & Grill is just one of several music venues in the City Centre. 

There is a sense of authenticity at the Blues Can in Inglewood.

There is a sense of authenticity at the Blues Can in Inglewood.

17th Avenue is lined with pubs and patios. 

17th Avenue is lined with pubs and patios. 

Festivals

Another defining element of a good City Centre is its signature festivals. Here is a list of Calgary’s major festivals that take place in our City Centre with a national or international component.

  • High Performance Rodeo (January)
  • Big Taste (March)
  • Calgary Expo (April)
  • Calgary International Children’s Festival (May)
  • Lilac Festival (May/June)
  • SLED Island (June)
  • Calgary Stampede (July)
  • Calgary International Folk Festival (July)
  • Beakerhead (September)
  • Calgary International Film Festival (September)
  • Wordfest (October)
The Calgary Stampede is the mother of all Calgary festivals. It is more than just a rodeo, it is an agricultural fair, chuckwagon races, a midway, a music festival, a grandstand show and mega fireworks show. 

The Calgary Stampede is the mother of all Calgary festivals. It is more than just a rodeo, it is an agricultural fair, chuckwagon races, a midway, a music festival, a grandstand show and mega fireworks show. 

Prince's Island and the Calgary International Folk Festival is a magical experience.

Prince's Island and the Calgary International Folk Festival is a magical experience.

Calgary hosts one of the biggest and best cosplay festivals in Canada.

Calgary hosts one of the biggest and best cosplay festivals in Canada.

FFQ Elements

Great City Centers have fun, funky and quirky things to see and do.  Calgary’s offers Friday Night Drumming Circles in Inglewood, to Sunday afternoon cricket matches in Riley Park, to three Saturday afternoon blues jams Calgary’s City Centre. Family fun can be had at Canada’s second largest Zoo on an island in the middle of the Bow River and next door is the quirky looking TELUS Spark science center.  Wander the lobbies of downtown’s office buildings and you will find a real bush plane hanging from the ceiling of an office building (Suncor Centre), or a bison skeleton in the Sun Life Plaza or lobby full of masterpieces of Canadian Art by the likes of Shadbolt and Riopelle (Eighth Avenue Place).  Need I go on?

Old school outdoor shoe shine fun in Kensington!

Old school outdoor shoe shine fun in Kensington!

Saturday afternoon dancing in Tomkins Park anyone? 

Saturday afternoon dancing in Tomkins Park anyone? 

Sunday afternoon fishing in the Bow!

Sunday afternoon fishing in the Bow!

Last Word

I am not alone in thinking Calgary has a great City Centre.  In 2014 the Canadian Institute of Planners chose Inglewood as “Canada’s Best Neighbourhood,” with Kensington being one of the runner-ups.  Both have gotten better since then with exciting new condo projects.

While I recognize our City Centre isn’t perfect, I stand by my observation that it is one of the best in North America. In fact, based on the City of Calgary community profiles, over 75,000 Calgarians (6% of overall city population) live in our City Centre and 5,600 (7.5%) are children under the age of 14 (based on 2014 Census). These are healthy numbers on a per capita basis and are on par with Vancouver, considered by many urbanists to be one of the world’s best places for urban living.

Every time I visit another North American city, I develop a better appreciation for Calgary’s City Centre as a clean, safe and interesting place to live. While it is hard for Calgary to compete with larger and older cities like Montreal, Boston, New York, Chicago and San Francisco, I would put Calgary’s City Centre communities up against those of Vancouver, Portland, Austin, Nashville or Denver anytime. 

Oh, and if you still want to call me a “Calgary cheerleader,” I am OK with that.

If you want to learn more about Calgary City Centre checkout these links:

Calgary's Coolest Neighbourhoods: Inglewood

Mission is marvellous

Beltline: Calgary's Hipster/Nester Community

Bridgeland/Riverside's Rebirth

Kensington: Calgary's Left Bank is cool!

Downtown Living is cooler than you think!

Urban Sprawl: Who wants to live way out here?

I really do need to get out more. Specifically, to the edges of the city, to see what is happening in Calgary’s new frontier.  Recently, I was reminded of this when driving some buddies (inner-city boys) out for a round at Canals of Delacour golf course, which meant we had to drive past the airport.  Who does that?

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Our immediate reaction as we passed the airport was to marvel at all of the development happening east of the airport.  After a bit of chatter, one buddy said “Who would want to live out here?” My response, “That is exactly what people said when Lakeview, Lake Bonavista and Dalhousie were built at the edge of the city 40+ years ago.”

He smiled and sheepishly admitted that when he moved to Charleswood in the early ‘60s, it too was treeless, there was no University of Calgary, no Brentwood Mall or LRT station and indeed, people asked him “Why do you want to live so far out?”  The other buddy agreed that it was the same for him when he moved to Calgary 40+ years ago and chose to live in Beddington before moving to the inner-city. 

When I pointed out people living in these new northeast communities have easy access to Stoney Trail, the airport, CrossIron Mills (shopping and cinema), Lowe’s Home Improvement and the New Horizon shopping centre opening this summer – and of course, Costco.  

I then hit them with buddy’s motto “If Costco doesn’t have it, I don’t need it,” which resulted in agreement all around.  I also reminded them that with the popularity of online shopping for groceries, clothing, electronics and other everyday needs, having stores nearby isn’t as important as it once was.

Both admitted living out here might not be that bad after all and that getting a bigger home by living further from downtown was one of the reasons they chose to live on the edge of the city when they moved to Calgary and had young families. One even said, “who needs to live near downtown.  I never go there anyway.” Ouch!

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Not your parent’s suburbs

However, what is different about these new suburbs, compared with those 40 or 50 years ago is they are not a sea of single-family homes on huge lots, but a diversity of housing options including, single-family homes, duplexes, row houses and mid-rise condos (4 to 6 storeys high). 

Two days later, when heading out to play another round at Canal at Delacour, (yes, I love the course) I decided to leave early to explore these new communities and see for myself what was happening. 

I was gobsmacked by Truman’s Orchard Sky project with its cluster of seven condo buildings totalling 423 new homes within walking distance of a school, park and pathway in the new community called Skyview Ranch.  I also saw what looked to be a large, 6 storey wood frame residential building nearby, as well as other four-story residential buildings along the main corridor.  While it might not be the Beltline or East Village, it is certainly not the low-density suburbs of the mid to late 20th century. 

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Name Game

It can all get a bit confusing when you read the marketing information and learn there is a new community in the northeast called Savanna that is actually in the community of Saddle Ridge.  Or, when there is both a Cornerstone and Cornerbrook community in the northeast. I think one might be within the boundaries of the other, but it wasn’t clear.  As if the naming of the streets wasn’t confusing enough with all of the street names looking the same, now the community names also overlap.   

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Last Word

It is not only at the northeast edge that Calgary’s condo invasion is happening. It is also in the southwest, southeast, west side and directly north up Centre Street.  A quick check with the City of Calgary and there are currently 23 condo construction sites in new communities creating 2,693 new homes for Calgarians. 

Condo living is not only just starter home for young Calgarians in the suburbs. It is a lifestyle option for people of all ages and backgrounds in in the 21st century.

Note: An edited version of this blog was published in the July 2018 edition of Condo Living Magazine. 

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

80% of Calgarians must live in the suburbs!

Everyday Tourist's Road Trip to the 'burbs!

Not Your Parent's Suburbs!

Postcards From Saskatoon: Public Art Capital of the Prairies?

We recently spent an extended weekend in Saskatoon and were most impressed by the public art that was seemingly everywhere from street art to murals, from bike racks to art parks and lots in between.

Check out these postcards and see if you agree!

"Art imitates life" or is it the other way around.  I love how these girls were inspired to climb and play with this piece by Saskatchewan artist William Epp titled "Tribute to Youth" created in 1989.  Public art should engage the public. 

"Art imitates life" or is it the other way around.  I love how these girls were inspired to climb and play with this piece by Saskatchewan artist William Epp titled "Tribute to Youth" created in 1989.  Public art should engage the public. 

Making A Statement 

I was gobsmacked by this nine storey tall mural on the side of the First Nations Bank building in downtown Saskatoon.      The mural was painted by Saskatchewan artist Emmanuel Jarus. I loved the tenderness that is depicted in such a large work.  While the child is obviously of indigenous descent, the parents are more ambiguous which allows for different interpretations.     Is it about new beginnings? Is it about the importance of family? Is is about love? Is it about dependence? Is it a contemporary interpretation of the "mother and child" image that has been part of painting history for centuries.   

I was gobsmacked by this nine storey tall mural on the side of the First Nations Bank building in downtown Saskatoon. 

The mural was painted by Saskatchewan artist Emmanuel Jarus. I loved the tenderness that is depicted in such a large work.  While the child is obviously of indigenous descent, the parents are more ambiguous which allows for different interpretations.

Is it about new beginnings? Is it about the importance of family? Is is about love? Is it about dependence? Is it a contemporary interpretation of the "mother and child" image that has been part of painting history for centuries.  

I think it is also very fitting that the piece is on the side of the First Nations Bank building given its First Nation references.  The red ribbon in the mother's hair is meant to commemorate missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls.    Note: The piece is part of the City of Saskatoon's Placemaker program for public art.  It cost $15,000.  Yes this is a real family from the Yellow Quill First Nation, 195 km east of Saskatoon. 

I think it is also very fitting that the piece is on the side of the First Nations Bank building given its First Nation references.  The red ribbon in the mother's hair is meant to commemorate missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls.

Note: The piece is part of the City of Saskatoon's Placemaker program for public art.  It cost $15,000.  Yes this is a real family from the Yellow Quill First Nation, 195 km east of Saskatoon. 

The City Centre Church mural in Riversdale also captured my attention. Too often street art is more decorative with little in the way of an artist's statement.      In this case the imagery is very hard hitting, with references to the struggles of justice, alcohol and religion faced by indigenous people past and present.     There is a very strong presence in Saskatoon of indigenous people are using contemporary art genres to express their plight.  

The City Centre Church mural in Riversdale also captured my attention. Too often street art is more decorative with little in the way of an artist's statement. 

In this case the imagery is very hard hitting, with references to the struggles of justice, alcohol and religion faced by indigenous people past and present.

There is a very strong presence in Saskatoon of indigenous people are using contemporary art genres to express their plight.  

I loved clever hybridization of graffiti painting with realism in this mural.  

I loved clever hybridization of graffiti painting with realism in this mural.  

The impact of this mural is amplified by the fact the Ukrainian Orthodox Holy Trinity Cathedral is located across the street.

The impact of this mural is amplified by the fact the Ukrainian Orthodox Holy Trinity Cathedral is located across the street.

Signature Public Art 

Every city has a signature piece of art, in Saskatoon that is probably Doug Bentham's "Unfurl"  located in the middle of a busy intersection at the west side of the University Bridge.  One of the benchmarks of a good piece of art is that people still like it and are talking about it 10+ years later. 

In a recent Saskatoon StarPhoenix piece, Bentham notes people still stop and talk to him about the piece (yes, Bentham lives just outside of Saskatoon) and tell him how much they like the piece and how it changes with the weather.  He was also quoted as saying "Unfurled" taught him "it's OK to consider the public when conceiving a sculpture."  

"Unfurled" is locate in the middle of an intersection, not exactly the best site for the public to view the artwork.  I had to dodge a few cars to get to the base of the piece where the information panel is located. 

"Unfurled" is locate in the middle of an intersection, not exactly the best site for the public to view the artwork.  I had to dodge a few cars to get to the base of the piece where the information panel is located. 

From this angle is looks a bit like a pelican which ironically are found in the Saskatchewan river just a few feet away.  

From this angle is looks a bit like a pelican which ironically are found in the Saskatchewan river just a few feet away.  

Move just a few feet and it looks like scissors and thread.  I love ambiguous art that has reference to reality, but lets the viewer interpret the piece in infinite ways.   

Move just a few feet and it looks like scissors and thread.  I love ambiguous art that has reference to reality, but lets the viewer interpret the piece in infinite ways.  

University of Saskatchewan Art Park 

Hidden away on the edge of the University of Saskatchewan campus is an artpark. Head to the Diefenbaker Centre (FYI the Centre's facade is in poor shape, and the plants next to his grave are all dead - shame on whoever is responsible) and then go towards the river and you will find an unmarked art park near the pathway.  

Hidden away on the edge of the University of Saskatchewan campus is an artpark. Head to the Diefenbaker Centre (FYI the Centre's facade is in poor shape, and the plants next to his grave are all dead - shame on whoever is responsible) and then go towards the river and you will find an unmarked art park near the pathway.  

Public art should be made to climb on. 

Public art should be made to climb on. 

Most of the art in UofS's sculpture park has no didactic information i.e. name of artist, title, date etc.  It looks like anyone can just install their art here.  While the grass has been cut, some whipper snippering around at the base of the pieces is badly needed.   Turns out it is called the U of S sculpture garden and it was founded in 1993 as part of a sculpture symposium.  It could also use some curatorial direction as some of the pieces look pretty amateurish.  

Most of the art in UofS's sculpture park has no didactic information i.e. name of artist, title, date etc.  It looks like anyone can just install their art here.  While the grass has been cut, some whipper snippering around at the base of the pieces is badly needed. 

Turns out it is called the U of S sculpture garden and it was founded in 1993 as part of a sculpture symposium.  It could also use some curatorial direction as some of the pieces look pretty amateurish.  

The University of Saskatchewan campus has public art scattered throughout the campus, however much of it has no information on who is the artist, title of the work or date .  I later figured out this piece is by Eli Bornstein a famous local artist who has a studio on the banks of the Saskatchewan River just south of the city. The piece is located in front of the Synchroton Research building that studies sources of brilliant light.  I thought it was by Ron Kostyniuk who was born in the small community of Wakaw, Saskatchewan, in 1941. He studied at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon and later became an art professor at the University of Calgary where I met him when I was working at the Muttart Art Gallery. 

The University of Saskatchewan campus has public art scattered throughout the campus, however much of it has no information on who is the artist, title of the work or date.  I later figured out this piece is by Eli Bornstein a famous local artist who has a studio on the banks of the Saskatchewan River just south of the city. The piece is located in front of the Synchroton Research building that studies sources of brilliant light.

I thought it was by Ron Kostyniuk who was born in the small community of Wakaw, Saskatchewan, in 1941. He studied at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon and later became an art professor at the University of Calgary where I met him when I was working at the Muttart Art Gallery. 

Urban Design As Art

I loved these bollard that look like mini contemporary grain elevators.  I love when art can also have a function i.e. pedestrian safety. 

I loved these bollard that look like mini contemporary grain elevators.  I love when art can also have a function i.e. pedestrian safety. 

When I first saw this I thought it was public art that referenced the animal traps of the fur traders who were responsible for the early exploration and settlement of the area.  I also liked historical text. Later I learned they were bike racks.  

When I first saw this I thought it was public art that referenced the animal traps of the fur traders who were responsible for the early exploration and settlement of the area.  I also liked historical text. Later I learned they were bike racks.  

Bike rack or public art? 

Bike rack or public art? 

If Joe Farfard designed a bike rack?

If Joe Farfard designed a bike rack?

Bike racks on Broadway. 

Bike racks on Broadway. 

Popular Public Art

Perhaps we should include children on public art juries. 

Perhaps we should include children on public art juries. 

Every public art collection must have a huge animal in the middle of the sidewalk.  This is the first musk ox sculpture I have seen. 

Every public art collection must have a huge animal in the middle of the sidewalk.  This is the first musk ox sculpture I have seen. 

"Launch Time" is just one of many public art pieces along Saskatoon's River Walk in the downtown.  These canoe-like fragments are a collaborate piece by Mel Bolen, Charley Farrero, Michael Hosaluk and Sean Whalley. 

"Launch Time" is just one of many public art pieces along Saskatoon's River Walk in the downtown.  These canoe-like fragments are a collaborate piece by Mel Bolen, Charley Farrero, Michael Hosaluk and Sean Whalley. 

Decorative Arts

Mural on the side of the mid-century modern Hudson's Bay department store that is now a condo. 

Mural on the side of the mid-century modern Hudson's Bay department store that is now a condo. 

Street Art / Graffiti 

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MOTA stands for Museum of Temporary Art (MoTA) that was initiated in 2012 by Jeff Nachitgall in the Riversdale neighbourhood. The works are created in a studio and then attached to the wall like they would be in an art gallery. He wanted to engage people who don't visit art galleries.  I found about six MOTA pieces in the alleys and side streets of Riversdale.

MOTA stands for Museum of Temporary Art (MoTA) that was initiated in 2012 by Jeff Nachitgall in the Riversdale neighbourhood. The works are created in a studio and then attached to the wall like they would be in an art gallery. He wanted to engage people who don't visit art galleries.  I found about six MOTA pieces in the alleys and side streets of Riversdale.

Quirky Art 

I definitely think this entrance could be considered to be public art.  

I definitely think this entrance could be considered to be public art. 

This sculpture, "Jump" by Brian Newman located behind City Hall would fit nicely into a children's playground. 

This sculpture, "Jump" by Brian Newman located behind City Hall would fit nicely into a children's playground. 

I loved these Picasso inspired folk art pieces. I loved them so much I tracked down the artist and brought home two - blog to follow.

I loved these Picasso inspired folk art pieces. I loved them so much I tracked down the artist and brought home two - blog to follow.

I found a few of these fun top hat cross walk figures.  I love this kind of fun creativity.  It reminded me of "Amplemannchen" a cartoon-like human figure used in West Germany traffic signals for walk and stop.  

I found a few of these fun top hat cross walk figures.  I love this kind of fun creativity.  It reminded me of "Amplemannchen" a cartoon-like human figure used in West Germany traffic signals for walk and stop.  

Another reference to the fur trading industry? 

Another reference to the fur trading industry? 

Found this mysterious fabric piece in the front yard of a modest home in the Nutana neighbourhood that could easily be that of an artist. I like the idea of utilizing the front yard as an outdoor gallery or studio space. 

Found this mysterious fabric piece in the front yard of a modest home in the Nutana neighbourhood that could easily be that of an artist. I like the idea of utilizing the front yard as an outdoor gallery or studio space. 

I understand it is common practice to dress-up sculptures in Saskatoon.  This one was dressed up for the Pride Parade. 

I understand it is common practice to dress-up sculptures in Saskatoon.  This one was dressed up for the Pride Parade. 

Last Word 

While Saskatoon might not have a public artwork by a world renowned artist, I think that works in their favour.  Their public art is about Saskatoon by Saskatoonians.  It isn't the ubiquitous public art you see in every North American city.  It helps create a unique sense of place.    

I was told by a local that many of the new pieces are leased from the artist for a 3-year period and then returned to the artist.  Public art doesn't have to be permanent art!

Hmm....perhaps Calgary should have develop a "lease to buy" program for public art which would allow controversial pieces to be removed if they haven't gained public acceptance after three years. 

It seemed like there was public art or artifacts on every block of Saskatoon's city center, which is why I think Saskatoon could be called the "Public Art Capital of the Prairies." 

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Putting The Public Back Into Public Art

Do we really need all of this public art?

Ranked: Public Art In Downtown Saskatoon