Southern Alberta Road Trip: Folk Art & Architecture Postcards 

Recently we decided to take a three day road trip south from Calgary to Lethbridge, over to Waterton National Park and then home.  Along the way we dropped into numerous small towns and villages like Carseland, Vulcan, Carmongay, Barons, Nobleford, Picture Butte, Magrath, Cardston, Pincher Creek and Longview to check out their main streets, side streets and back alleys to see what fun surprises there might be.

We weren’t disappointed. We found some mega birdhouses, quirky, quasi public art, historic churches, artifacts and architecture and funky street signs. We began to call it the folk art and architecture tour.

Here are some postcards from our tour….   

Was surprise to find this fish monument celebrating the 100th anniversary of the founding of the town Carseland (population 525) which is near, but not next to the Bow River.

Was surprise to find this fish monument celebrating the 100th anniversary of the founding of the town Carseland (population 525) which is near, but not next to the Bow River.

Loved this quirky homemade birdhouse that combines traffic lights with railway cars. The entire front yard was like a folk art gallery.

Loved this quirky homemade birdhouse that combines traffic lights with railway cars. The entire front yard was like a folk art gallery.

The architecture of the Carseland School reminded me of the old wooden grain sheds that dot the prairies.

The architecture of the Carseland School reminded me of the old wooden grain sheds that dot the prairies.

Aspen Crossing at Mossleigh is a real hidden gem. The Aspen Crossing Railway is a heritage railway in Southern Alberta, southeast of Calgary. In 2002 the last CP train ran through Mossleigh, however, after 6 years of negotiations Jason Thornhill, the creator of Aspen Crossing, was successful in securing the rights to 14 miles of rail line. Today, you can enjoy Champagne Brunch, Dinner Theatre, High Tea or Aies on Rails while riding a vintage train. They even have a Circus Train. More info:  https://www.aspencrossing.com/railway

Aspen Crossing at Mossleigh is a real hidden gem. The Aspen Crossing Railway is a heritage railway in Southern Alberta, southeast of Calgary. In 2002 the last CP train ran through Mossleigh, however, after 6 years of negotiations Jason Thornhill, the creator of Aspen Crossing, was successful in securing the rights to 14 miles of rail line. Today, you can enjoy Champagne Brunch, Dinner Theatre, High Tea or Aies on Rails while riding a vintage train. They even have a Circus Train. More info: https://www.aspencrossing.com/railway

We enjoyed just wandering the grounds that includes several vintage railway cars, gift shop and greenhouse.

We enjoyed just wandering the grounds that includes several vintage railway cars, gift shop and greenhouse.

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The highlight of the Aspen Crossing visit was having a coffee in the Diefenbaker Dinaing Car. It was purchased from Chicago to become Prime Minister John Diefenbaker’s “whistle-stop” rail car from 1958 to mid-1960. After 1962, John George Diefenbaker used the Pullman car as his private business car. Rumour has it, it once belonged to an “infamous gangster club.”

The highlight of the Aspen Crossing visit was having a coffee in the Diefenbaker Dinaing Car. It was purchased from Chicago to become Prime Minister John Diefenbaker’s “whistle-stop” rail car from 1958 to mid-1960. After 1962, John George Diefenbaker used the Pullman car as his private business car. Rumour has it, it once belonged to an “infamous gangster club.”

Next Stop Vulcan (population 1,917), where the entire town has embraced the Star Trek theme as a means of attracting tourists and adding some fun to living there.

Next Stop Vulcan (population 1,917), where the entire town has embraced the Star Trek theme as a means of attracting tourists and adding some fun to living there.

Even some of the lampposts have a Star Trek connection.

Even some of the lampposts have a Star Trek connection.

At first I thought this was public art as it looks like a series of grain elevators. But I quickly learned it is a Solar Park that is both fun and educational with its didactic panels. Love the linking of science, art and a park.

At first I thought this was public art as it looks like a series of grain elevators. But I quickly learned it is a Solar Park that is both fun and educational with its didactic panels. Love the linking of science, art and a park.

The park has several colourful light boxes.

The park has several colourful light boxes.

Found these all over town…this one was at the entrance to the Library. How fun!

Found these all over town…this one was at the entrance to the Library. How fun!

Many of the shop windows make some reference to Star Trek.

Many of the shop windows make some reference to Star Trek.

Even the crosswalks have a Star Trek link.

Even the crosswalks have a Star Trek link.

If you explore Vulcan a bit more you will find bizarre buildings like this one.

If you explore Vulcan a bit more you will find bizarre buildings like this one.

This is Vulcan’s Visitor Information Centre which includes a small Star Trek museum.

This is Vulcan’s Visitor Information Centre which includes a small Star Trek museum.

Driving by on the highway you see the model of the Starship Enterprise and a huge fun solar flower both foreshadowing what there is to see if you stop and explore the town.

Driving by on the highway you see the model of the Starship Enterprise and a huge fun solar flower both foreshadowing what there is to see if you stop and explore the town.

Next stop Carmangay (population 242), which is known for its fire tower. Link:  Village History

Next stop Carmangay (population 242), which is known for its fire tower. Link: Village History

At the entrance to Carmangay is a wind turbine blade lying on the ground that allows you to appreciate just how large they are. Also makes for a great piece of public art with its distinctive shape and soft flowing lines. A nice surprise.

At the entrance to Carmangay is a wind turbine blade lying on the ground that allows you to appreciate just how large they are. Also makes for a great piece of public art with its distinctive shape and soft flowing lines. A nice surprise.

We were surprise to find this well preserved church on a side street, it was a reminder of the importance of churches in establishing communities across the prairies a 100 years ago.

We were surprise to find this well preserved church on a side street, it was a reminder of the importance of churches in establishing communities across the prairies a 100 years ago.

I expect this was a garage, today it would make a great artist’s studio. We found several corner buildings with similar rounded form like this on our adventure.

I expect this was a garage, today it would make a great artist’s studio. We found several corner buildings with similar rounded form like this on our adventure.

Next stop Champion (population 317) where we found this enchanting birdhouse on one the side streets.

Next stop Champion (population 317) where we found this enchanting birdhouse on one the side streets.

Next stop Barons (population 341), which once had a lovely tree line boulevard for its main street. Today looks very much like a ghost town. It is the northern tip of what is know as the Palliser Triangle. It is perhaps most famous as being a filming location for a scene in the 1978 Superman film.

Next stop Barons (population 341), which once had a lovely tree line boulevard for its main street. Today looks very much like a ghost town. It is the northern tip of what is know as the Palliser Triangle. It is perhaps most famous as being a filming location for a scene in the 1978 Superman film.

Nature is slowly taking over this old motel on Main Street.

Nature is slowly taking over this old motel on Main Street.

Someone has tried to brighten up this building and main street with a mural, but it has seen better days.

Someone has tried to brighten up this building and main street with a mural, but it has seen better days.

The quilt-like mural is composed of blocks each with a name of a local family.

The quilt-like mural is composed of blocks each with a name of a local family.

Loved these hand cut steel street signs.

Loved these hand cut steel street signs.

This one made me think of my Mom who calls herself “The Queen of the Rails.”

This one made me think of my Mom who calls herself “The Queen of the Rails.”

Next stop Nobleford population 1,280 where we found this charming wooden train in a backyard. Nobleford has realized an amazing revitalization since 2005 with a population increase of 50%, a 300% increase in employment and possibly the lowest municipal taxes in Canada.

Next stop Nobleford population 1,280 where we found this charming wooden train in a backyard. Nobleford has realized an amazing revitalization since 2005 with a population increase of 50%, a 300% increase in employment and possibly the lowest municipal taxes in Canada.

Not sure if this is suppose to be folk art or some contemporary art installation about how we clutter our lives with things.

Not sure if this is suppose to be folk art or some contemporary art installation about how we clutter our lives with things.

This old ice cream parlour with its board walk in Picture Butte (population 1,810) caught our attention, but unfortunately it is closed.

This old ice cream parlour with its board walk in Picture Butte (population 1,810) caught our attention, but unfortunately it is closed.

However, we did find this folk art gate. We haven’t seen one like this before.

However, we did find this folk art gate. We haven’t seen one like this before.

After an over night stay in Lethbridge our next stop was Magrath (population 2,374) where we were greeted by its unique skyline.

After an over night stay in Lethbridge our next stop was Magrath (population 2,374) where we were greeted by its unique skyline.

Love how this modern grain elevator has a miniature historic grain elevator on the top, but with a rounded roof rather than a pointed pitched roof.

Love how this modern grain elevator has a miniature historic grain elevator on the top, but with a rounded roof rather than a pointed pitched roof.

I have never seen a Civic Ave in any town or city before.

I have never seen a Civic Ave in any town or city before.

What is it about small towns and fun fire hydrants. Some might see then a kitschy but I love them.

What is it about small towns and fun fire hydrants. Some might see then a kitschy but I love them.

Some might also see this mural as kitschy but I found it intriguing.

Some might also see this mural as kitschy but I found it intriguing.

Next stop Cardston population 3,585. This log house was built by Charles Ora Card who in the autumn of 1887 led the first group of Mormons from Utah to Canada. It was one of the first buildings in the new Cardston townsite and remained for many years the centre of Cardston’s development.

Next stop Cardston population 3,585. This log house was built by Charles Ora Card who in the autumn of 1887 led the first group of Mormons from Utah to Canada. It was one of the first buildings in the new Cardston townsite and remained for many years the centre of Cardston’s development.

Loved the oversized arches of the School Division building.

Loved the oversized arches of the School Division building.

Guess a coat of paint made this building the New Block.

Guess a coat of paint made this building the New Block.

Cardston’s lovely historic Main Street was deserted on Saturday morning as everyone was at church.

Cardston’s lovely historic Main Street was deserted on Saturday morning as everyone was at church.

The Art Deco theatre was the architectural highlight of the street.

The Art Deco theatre was the architectural highlight of the street.

This old hotel dominated Cardston’s Main Street like a ghost of past prosperity.

This old hotel dominated Cardston’s Main Street like a ghost of past prosperity.

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What a great name for a cafe….

What a great name for a cafe….

Not sure if I like the paint job or not, but love the rounded corner.

Not sure if I like the paint job or not, but love the rounded corner.

As the Executive Director of the Calgary Downtown Association I ignited one of the first “Say No To Panhandlers” campaigns in Canada. You don’t hear much about panhandling problems anymore are there fewer or have we just accepted them.

As the Executive Director of the Calgary Downtown Association I ignited one of the first “Say No To Panhandlers” campaigns in Canada. You don’t hear much about panhandling problems anymore are there fewer or have we just accepted them.

On Main Street was a charming Mormon bookstore. It was an very interesting place to explore as it had a very different vibe with everyone dressed up as they were going or coming from church. It also had some unique books like this one.

On Main Street was a charming Mormon bookstore. It was an very interesting place to explore as it had a very different vibe with everyone dressed up as they were going or coming from church. It also had some unique books like this one.

Perfect bench!

Perfect bench!

The clouds in the background created a surreal sense of place for the temple entrance.

The clouds in the background created a surreal sense of place for the temple entrance.

Sandstone buildings always have charm and warmth that makes them timeless.

Sandstone buildings always have charm and warmth that makes them timeless.

Next stop Waterton (population 104) and the majestic Prince of Wales hotel.

Next stop Waterton (population 104) and the majestic Prince of Wales hotel.

I think it would make a great birdhouse!

I think it would make a great birdhouse!

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Yes the hotel still uses room keys.

Yes the hotel still uses room keys.

Was surprised to find this 20th century artifact in downtown Waterton.

Was surprised to find this 20th century artifact in downtown Waterton.

One of the many charming cottages in Waterton.

One of the many charming cottages in Waterton.

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Love how the roof of the church mirrors the mountain behind. By design or chance?

Love how the roof of the church mirrors the mountain behind. By design or chance?

Classic mid century garage today not only serves the needs of vehicles, but also rents bikes and kayaks, as well as being a convenience store.

Classic mid century garage today not only serves the needs of vehicles, but also rents bikes and kayaks, as well as being a convenience store.

One of the reason for out trip was to experience the live music at the Twin Butte General Store that was recently written up as one of Alberta’s best honky-tonks.  Link: Searching for Calgary’s true country heart  We had front row seats, but I wouldn’t call it a real honky-tonk as it is more a restaurant than a live music venue - I’d take Calgary’s Blues Can any day. But if you are in the area it is a must stop as it is a quirky general store.

One of the reason for out trip was to experience the live music at the Twin Butte General Store that was recently written up as one of Alberta’s best honky-tonks. Link: Searching for Calgary’s true country heart We had front row seats, but I wouldn’t call it a real honky-tonk as it is more a restaurant than a live music venue - I’d take Calgary’s Blues Can any day. But if you are in the area it is a must stop as it is a quirky general store.

Twin Butte population 10.

Twin Butte population 10.

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Next stop Pincher Creek population 3,642 with its pleasant Main Street.

Next stop Pincher Creek population 3,642 with its pleasant Main Street.

This strange sculpture marks the entrance to downtown. The plaque gives no information on the artist or its significance. Turns out it is an enlarged pincer that would be used for trimming the feet of horses. Turns out in 1868 when a group of prospectors lost a pincer in the small creek at this location and in 1876 the North-West Mounted Police discovered the rusting tool in the creek and named the area Pincher Creek.

This strange sculpture marks the entrance to downtown. The plaque gives no information on the artist or its significance. Turns out it is an enlarged pincer that would be used for trimming the feet of horses. Turns out in 1868 when a group of prospectors lost a pincer in the small creek at this location and in 1876 the North-West Mounted Police discovered the rusting tool in the creek and named the area Pincher Creek.

it has the typical historic murals, as well as some surprises.

it has the typical historic murals, as well as some surprises.

Who let this cow out of the pasture? Is this one of Calgary’s “Udderly Art” cows? The cow is on the balcony of the historic King Edward Hotel.

Who let this cow out of the pasture? Is this one of Calgary’s “Udderly Art” cows? The cow is on the balcony of the historic King Edward Hotel.

Quilt shop window…

Quilt shop window…

Pincher Creek’s Kootenai Brown Pioneer Village is definitely worth a visit. They had an amazing quilt show when we were there.

Pincher Creek’s Kootenai Brown Pioneer Village is definitely worth a visit. They had an amazing quilt show when we were there.

There is lots of fun local history artifacts.

There is lots of fun local history artifacts.

The Museum also includes a village that is very much like Calgary’s Heritage Park but on a smaller scale.

The Museum also includes a village that is very much like Calgary’s Heritage Park but on a smaller scale.

I am a sucker for minimalist architecture.

I am a sucker for minimalist architecture.

I am also a sucker for brick and rounded corners.

I am also a sucker for brick and rounded corners.

Next stop Longview population 307 and a popular watering hole along Highway #22. The towns Main Street has two iconic hotels - Twin Cities Hotel and Blue Sky Motel. It has also become a bit of an artists colony with several art galleries and cafes.

Next stop Longview population 307 and a popular watering hole along Highway #22. The towns Main Street has two iconic hotels - Twin Cities Hotel and Blue Sky Motel. It has also become a bit of an artists colony with several art galleries and cafes.

Blue Sky Motel.

Blue Sky Motel.

We were surprise to find The Film Experience Camera Store with its huge collection of film cameras and accessories. It literally has hundreds, maybe over a thousand vintage film cameras, lenses and accessories. It is rumoured to be the largest film camera store in Canada. Owner David Marshall is very friendly and knowledgeable. Next door is the Prairie Light Gallery that feature his photography ,as well as others.

We were surprise to find The Film Experience Camera Store with its huge collection of film cameras and accessories. It literally has hundreds, maybe over a thousand vintage film cameras, lenses and accessories. It is rumoured to be the largest film camera store in Canada. Owner David Marshall is very friendly and knowledgeable. Next door is the Prairie Light Gallery that feature his photography ,as well as others.

A blast from the past….

A blast from the past….

Our adventure ended as it began with a front yard full of pieces of folk art.

Our adventure ended as it began with a front yard full of pieces of folk art.

Road Trip: Postcards From Alberta's Badlands & Ghost Towns

This summer we decided to explore some of the off-the-beaten path places in southern Alberta. Our first adventure was to Drumheller (where we haven’t been for decades) and to some of the small town “main streets” along the way, as well as the Badlands.  

This road trip strengthen our resolve to think outside the “city.”

Public Art?

Public Art?

More public art?

More public art?

HOPE….found this book sculpture at the Salvation Army in Drumheller.

HOPE….found this book sculpture at the Salvation Army in Drumheller.

Everybody loves a train ride!

Everybody loves a train ride!

First Stop: Irricana (population 1,216) 

Its name is a contraction of the words “irrigation canals” which are found in the area.  Settlement dates back to 1909 and it was incorporated as a village on June 9, 1911, by which time it had a post office, hotel and general store operated by the Irricana Trading Company.  Today, though the store’s building is still standing, is abandoned and much of the Main Street consists of vacant lots making it look like a ghost-town. While there are some attempts to add some colour and charm with murals, it seems a bit futile.  

However, just outside of town on the highway #9, sits a fun installation of farm equipment mounted high up on posts promoting, Pioneer Acres, where I am told you will find a dozen buildings filled with unique exhibits and artifacts from the early prairie pioneers.  Too bad those buildings weren’t located in the town along Main Street. 

Link:Pioneer Acres https://www.pioneeracres.ab.ca

The Irricana Hotel a reminder of the community’s once bustling Main Street. Today “Old Smoky” stands guard. The plaque says the horse was fabricated by Kevan Leycraft and donated by Melvin Brown to commemorate his residence in Irricana since 1952. He passed away in 1997.

The Irricana Hotel a reminder of the community’s once bustling Main Street. Today “Old Smoky” stands guard. The plaque says the horse was fabricated by Kevan Leycraft and donated by Melvin Brown to commemorate his residence in Irricana since 1952. He passed away in 1997.

Main Street Irricana.

Main Street Irricana.

One of several large paintings attached to the sides buildings in downtown Irricana to add some colour and charm. These were done by artists Leona Fraser in 2009.

One of several large paintings attached to the sides buildings in downtown Irricana to add some colour and charm. These were done by artists Leona Fraser in 2009.

Second Stop:  Beiseker (population 819) 

Lying in a belt of rich black soil, Beiseker was developed as an agricultural service centre. It was founded by the Calgary Colonization Company, whose purpose was to promote settlement by demonstrating the grain-growing potential of the area. The village is named after Thomas Beiseker, a partner and vice president of the company. The surrounding area became known as "World Wheat King Capital" because of its ability to grow wheat. Today, a  small park at the end of main street tells the history of the town. It even has a tiny sod house that you can explore. 

The village began to grow in 1910 when the branch line of the Canadian Pacific Railway was completed. The Grand Trunk Pacific line - now owned by Canadian National Railway - was constructed in 1912 to the east of the central business district

With the construction and intersection of Highways 9, 72 and 806 being at the northeast edge of the village, Beiseker came to have a very favourable location in terms of road and rail access. Almost equidistant from Calgary and Drumheller, Beiseker began to emerge as a local service and trade centre for the surrounding rural agricultural area. 

Beiseker currently serves as a centre for local agricultural services including fertilizer, seed cleaning, and soil testing. There is a local UFA outlet, and a Canadian Malting Co. grain elevator serving farmers in the area. Local industries serve the oil patch.  

It is also home to the Canadian office of Lampson International, a large international company specializing in construction cranes and a biomedical incinerator which handles medical waste from hospitals in Alberta, Canada and internationally.  

Not unlike Irricana, wandering Beisker’s main street on a Saturday morning was akin to walking in a ghost town -  nobody on the streets, lots of the main street buildings are gone and those that remain look like they are struggling to survive.

Old and new, train station becomes City offices.

Old and new, train station becomes City offices.

It is hard to imagine that people actually lived year round in these tiny homes. Put the new “Tiny Homes” trend into perspective.

It is hard to imagine that people actually lived year round in these tiny homes. Put the new “Tiny Homes” trend into perspective.

If you wander around the residential streets your will find these fun gnome fire hydrants. We have seen these before in small Alberta towns. Not sure if this is an Alberta thing, prairie thing or small towns everywhere. They sure are fun.

If you wander around the residential streets your will find these fun gnome fire hydrants. We have seen these before in small Alberta towns. Not sure if this is an Alberta thing, prairie thing or small towns everywhere. They sure are fun.

We decided to have a coffee and pastry at Arcada Cafe….great cinnamon buns…and we almost missed the fact they have a vintage arcade room in the back. A must see for anyone into old arcade games.

We decided to have a coffee and pastry at Arcada Cafe….great cinnamon buns…and we almost missed the fact they have a vintage arcade room in the back. A must see for anyone into old arcade games.

Love the graphics on the old games….

Love the graphics on the old games….

Love the fun factor…

Love the fun factor…

Third Stop: Horseshoe Canyon Park 

 While not the Grand Canyon, Horseshoe Canyon sits just off Hwy 9, 17 km west of Drumheller in the Canadian Badlands. It is an eye-popping sight. Stand at the edge of this huge U-shaped canyon and try to imagine what it was like when the dinosaurs roamed a lush sub-tropical habitat some 70 million years ago. Today, marked trails guide your wandering down into the canyon to get a closer look at the different soils, rock formations and plants. There are even helicopter rides available on-site.  The park is free and there is lots of free parking. 

Horseshoe Canyon

Horseshoe Canyon

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Fourth Stop: Drumheller (population 7,982)

When we first moved to Alberta in the early ‘80s, Drumheller was best known as the home of the Drumheller Institution (aka prison). Opened in 1967 as a medium security facility, a minimum security facility was added in 1997. Today, it has a capacity of 704 (582 medium security and 122 minimum security). The Institution provides a stable economic and employment base for Drumheller and surrounding area. 

In the late 1980s, Drumheller became famous as a center for dinosaur tourism and research with the opening of the Tyrell Museum in 1985 (it subsequently received “Royal” status in 1990.  Located 6 km northwest from Drumheller, the museum is situated in the middle of the fossil-bearing strata of the Late Cretaceous Horseshoe Canyon Formationand holds 130,000 fossil specimens from the Alberta badlands, Dinosaur Provincial Park and the Devil's Coulee Dinosaur Egg Site.  In the first year it attracted over 500,000 visitors from over 100 countries. Today, it averages about 350,000 visitors annually. 

We opted to skip the museum (a new exhibition had just opened and it was a zoo) to flaneur downtown Drumheller. To our pleasant surprise, the downtown has several charming shops, restaurants - even a Saturday farmers’ market.  What impressed us most is how the city has capitalized on the dinosaur theme with fun creatures at every downtown corner making for great photo ops. We encounter several families exploring the downtown taking photos of the kids with the dinosaurs.

Love these fun cartoonish characters waiting for you to sit beside them. Perhaps cities take their public art programs too seriously. People just want to have fun….perhaps big cities take their public art too seriously?

Love these fun cartoonish characters waiting for you to sit beside them. Perhaps cities take their public art programs too seriously. People just want to have fun….perhaps big cities take their public art too seriously?

Downtown Drumheller has an eclectic collection of shops to explore.

Downtown Drumheller has an eclectic collection of shops to explore.

Treasure hunters will enjoy Drumheller’s downtown art galleries and antique stores.

Treasure hunters will enjoy Drumheller’s downtown art galleries and antique stores.

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Couldn’t resist one more postcard of the fun benches. I preferred these to the World’s largest dinosaur (86 ft high and 151 feet long) that is located a few blocks from downtown.

Couldn’t resist one more postcard of the fun benches. I preferred these to the World’s largest dinosaur (86 ft high and 151 feet long) that is located a few blocks from downtown.

There are dinosaurs everywhere you look in Dumheller.

There are dinosaurs everywhere you look in Dumheller.

Drumheller has preserved a sense of past in its downtown.

Drumheller has preserved a sense of past in its downtown.

How clever? All of the streets have not only old names but new dinosaur names. How fun!

How clever? All of the streets have not only old names but new dinosaur names. How fun!

Just outside of Drumheller on the way to Wayne is Asterroid a must stop for those who like ice cream. No road trip is complete with out an ice cream cone.

Just outside of Drumheller on the way to Wayne is Asterroid a must stop for those who like ice cream. No road trip is complete with out an ice cream cone.

 Fifth Stop: Wayne (population 40)

Wayne, located 10 km southeast of Drumheller was once a thriving coal mining town whose population is estimated to have reached a high of 10,000 in 1932. The last mine closed in 1957 and today it is home to about 40 diehard souls. Half the fun of visiting Wayne is navigating a winding road with 11 (no word of a lie)  one-lane bridges along a moon-like landscape to get there. 

In its heyday, Wayne had a school, hospital, hotel, theatre and several stores along its main street.  Today, all that remains is the Rosedeer Hotel which surprisingly still operates as a hotel and its Last Chance Saloon, now a popular watering hole for touring motorcycle groups.  The hotel has only 6 rooms, each with a different theme – Titanic, Golf, Harley, Miners, Honeymoon and Music Room.  

The Saloon often has live music and hosts the annual WayneStock music festival (this year’s festival is from August 30 to Sept 2, 2019).  While we were there the Maybellines were playing the afternoon set – it was magical. 

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Sixth Stop: East Coulee (population 148) 

We “passed” on stopping at the Hoodoos Park just east of Drumheller and proceeded directly to East Coulee and the Atlas Coal mine (a national historic site) site 16 km east of Drumheller. Once home to about 3,000 residents, its heyday was between 1920s and 1950s when, like Wayne, the coal mines were excavating hundreds of thousands of tons of coal.  Today, the old school has been converted into a museum which also hosts an annual spring music festival “SpringFest.”  Unfortunately we arrived just after 5 pm too late to get into the museum. 

The streets of East Coulee are lined with huge trees, giving it an oasis-like feeling compared to the barren surrounding landscape. The tiny miners’ homes are a reminder of how early pioneers lived in modest small homes, each probably housed six or more people.

Nothing is left of its main street except one large building that has been converted into a studio for the manufacturing of dinosaur-related items for museums, movie studios, parades and theme parks.  There is also a small gift shop with a lovely garden.  

Just across the river from East Coulee is The Atlas Coal Mine National Historic Site that operated from 1936 to 1979. It is the most complete historic coal mine in Canada and is home to the country's last standing wooden coal tipple. In fact, it’s  the largest still standing in North America. Designated a Provincial Historic Resource in 1989, it achieved  National Historic Site of Canada status in 2002. 

Various guided tour options exist. You can take a train ride through the site, walk up the tipple or tour the 210 foot underground conveyor tunnel. The facilities are open to visitors from May to Thanksgiving weekend. 

With not enough time to do a tour (we arrived 20 minutes before closing) we instead walked up the dead end road west of the parking lot where we had heard there was an art installation.  Sure enough, at the end of the road, stood dozens of five foot tall tree limbs with alien head-like nobs stuck in the ground with rock piles at their base to help them stay standing. Many of the limbs had various small trinkets hanging or sitting on them, creating a somber, graveyard sense of place.  There is no markings or signs indicating who did them, why there are there, which only adds to the mystique. 

You can hardly see the homes for the trees and shrubs in East Coulee. It is like time has passed this community by.

You can hardly see the homes for the trees and shrubs in East Coulee. It is like time has passed this community by.

We were shocked to find a gift shop in East Coulee.

We were shocked to find a gift shop in East Coulee.

All aboard….

All aboard….

Railway bridge from Atlas Coal mine to East Coulee and beyond.

Railway bridge from Atlas Coal mine to East Coulee and beyond.

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Atlas Coal mine site

Atlas Coal mine site

There is lots of mine artifacts next to the parking lot with information panels.

There is lots of mine artifacts next to the parking lot with information panels.

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Loved this coal dust sand box….

Loved this coal dust sand box….

Public Art?

Public Art?

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Seventh Stop: Rosebud (population 87) 

It was founded in the 1885 by James Wishart, while following the Gleichen Trail with his family on their way to Montana. Arriving in the dark, they awoke the next  morning to discover the river valley covered by wild roses- Alberta’s official flower. Wishart then reportedly said, "Here's the promised land; we go no further." 

The beauty of the valley has attracted many people throughout the years, from nature lovers to artists. Notable Canadian artists A. Y. Jackson and H. G. Glyde, members of the Group of Seven, spent the summer of 1944 painting in the area. 

 Over the years, farming and coal mining have been the primary industries. In 1972, the Severn Creek School was shut down as part of an Alberta-wide education consolidating process, forcing local children to be bussed to Standard and Drumheller.  This resulted in the closure of  many local businesses and the hamlet population dropping to under a dozen people. 

But at Easter 1973, a group of young adults from Calgary brought about 40 teenagers out and camped in the then empty mercantile building. This pilot event initially evolved into a summer camp funded by a grant from the Alberta government and then later, Rosebud Camp of the Arts supported by Crescent Heights Baptist Church in Calgary. 

In 1977, a high school was founded using the old buildings of the town as classrooms and emphasizing practical visual, music and the performing arts in its curriculum. In the 1980s, Rosebud School of the Arts began to operate theatre, which eventually developed into Rosebud Theatre and the school shifted its emphasis to post-secondary education. 

Today, Rosebud Theatre runs as a fully professional company that offers programming year round and is a tourist attraction drawing patrons largely from Calgary and Drumheller.  It has a few shops, an art gallery and an excellent museum along its two main streets.  There were probably a dozen people wandering the streets while we were there. There are even an inn and bed & breakfast accommodations for those not wanting to drive home after the theatre. 

While tourism might save Rosebud, it can’t save every small town and village in Alberta. 

Link: Rosebud Theatre 

Link: The Hamlet of Rosebud 

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The old hotel is now the offices for the Rosebud Theatre.

The old hotel is now the offices for the Rosebud Theatre.

The Rosebud Museum/Library has an extensive collection of early 20th century artifacts documenting the life of the early prairie settlers. Admission is FREE.

The Rosebud Museum/Library has an extensive collection of early 20th century artifacts documenting the life of the early prairie settlers. Admission is FREE.

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In the Library…the tag reads “Tailored by Suzanne est. 1952. Dress donated by Minnie Neufeld (Ziegler). Worn during the time Minnie waitressed for the Carolina a well-known restaurant in downtown Calgary. Off duty standards for dress and behaviour were very strict. No gum chewing, spitting or swearing in public.

In the Library…the tag reads “Tailored by Suzanne est. 1952. Dress donated by Minnie Neufeld (Ziegler). Worn during the time Minnie waitressed for the Carolina a well-known restaurant in downtown Calgary. Off duty standards for dress and behaviour were very strict. No gum chewing, spitting or swearing in public.

While wandering the streets we found this house with an elaborate model railway in the front yard. The house next door was in the process of being remodelled to sell model railway pieces.

While wandering the streets we found this house with an elaborate model railway in the front yard. The house next door was in the process of being remodelled to sell model railway pieces.

Lesson Learned

On our way home, we chatted about how this road trip was a good reminder of how Alberta and the prairies have evolved over thousands of years from roaming dinosaurs, to nomadic indigenous people, to agricultural and resource pioneers (first coal, then oil and gas), to today’s corporate farming and resource development.  

It is good for us city folks to get out and explore the real towns and villages (not just the tourist attractions and tourist towns - aka Banff and Canmore) to get a better perspective of the world we share.  While much of the media attention these days is about the urbanization of Canada and decline of rural living, there are still a significant number of people living in rural Alberta communities - 656,048 according to 2016 Census of Canada.

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Fairy Tale Postcards from University of British Columbia

One of the things we love to do when visiting any city is to flaneur the university and college campuses. Why? Because we are almost always reward with a fun experience. A recent visit to the University of British Columbia’s (UBC) campus was certainly no exception.

We found some amazing fun fairy tales books and illustrations.  

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Looking for hidden gems

While most people visiting UBC would immediately head to the world renowned Museum of Anthropology (MOA), we decided to explore the rest of campus first – Student Centre, Alumni Centre, Arts Building, Belkin Art Gallery etc.  While we didn’t find any hidden treasures, we did get a private behind the stage tour from the Marketing Director at the Wood Theatre. 

We did end up at MOA but it didn’t grab our imagination so we continued to wander the campus as it was a lovely spring afternoon for flaneuring UBC’s inviting pedestrian malls. Soon we noticed dozens of students enjoying the sun in the amphitheatre space in front of what looked like the oldest building on campus. We decided to head in that direction, thinking old buildings often have interesting things to see inside.

To our disappointment only the façade was old, the inside had been renovated and added to.  

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Had we struck out?

Then we noticed two interesting display case in the lobby with some fun historical fairy tale books, from around the world with great illustrations. Looking around we realized there were six other display cases with more historical fairy tale books. This is exactly what we were looking for – something fun, quirky and unique.       

We continued to look around and found the dramatic John Nutting glass sculpture hanging from the ceiling in the staircase, but nothing else captured our attention so we headed for the exit.  Fortunately, as we were heading out we notice a sign saying Rare Book and Special Collections Library down stairs.   

We both immediately said “Let’s check it out” as we have been rewarded in rare book collection libraries before.  Eureka…not only were nine more display cases with curated fairy tale books vignettes from the UBC’s collection, but there was also a well curated exhibition of The Chung Collection chronicling early B.C. history, immigration and settlement and its link to the Canadian Pacific Railway.  

The Rare Book and Special Collections staff Chelsea Shriver and Hiller Goodspeed were amazingly helpful, sharing with us more information about the exhibitions, the library and the fact three graduate students at the UBC iSchool (Library, Archival and Information Studies) - Renee Gaudet, Karen Ng and Ashlynn Prasad - had curated the exhibition titled “Across Enchanted Lands: Universal Motifs in Illustrated Fairy Tales.”  Kudos to them as they did a great job creating vignettes that were entertaining, engaging, educational and enlightening.    

Here are some postcards from both exhibitions, I hope will give you a sense of the incredible scope of the exhibitions and detail of the illustrations. I apologize that some of the text and photos are cropped poorly but that was to avoid the glare from the lights and glass.

Each of the display cases had a text panel and then several books relating to the theme described in the panel. The displays also included hand painted red and gold colouring with origami like flowers and figures created by Dr. Kathie Shoemaker the exhibition supervisor.

Each of the display cases had a text panel and then several books relating to the theme described in the panel. The displays also included hand painted red and gold colouring with origami like flowers and figures created by Dr. Kathie Shoemaker the exhibition supervisor.

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The Chung Collection

When Wally Chung was just six years old he spent many hours in his father’s Victoria tailor shop. One thing in particular that fascinated him was a colourful poster of the Empress of Asia, the CP ship that brought his mother to Canada in 1919. It fired the boy’s imagination and inspired hime to start collecting.

Starting with clippings for his scrapbooks, Dr. Chung spent more than 60 years assembling on the most extensive collections of its kind in North America. The Chung Collection includes more than 25,000 rare items: documents, books, maps, posters, paintings, photographs, silver, glass, ceramic ware and other artifacts related to early B.C. history, immigration and settlement and the Canadian Pacific Railway Company.

(excerpt from the exhibition brochure)

Link: Video The Chung Collection (definitely worth watching)

Link: UBC Rare Books The Chung Collection

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Everyday Tourist Travel Tips

  1. If you are in Vancouver and have time you should definitely check out the Rare Book Library’s exhibitions at UBC.  The Chung Collection will probably still be there as it is a permanent exhibition, but the fairy tales book exhibition is only on until the end of May 2019. But I am sure it will be replaced by something equally as interesting.

  2. If you are visiting a new city you should always plan to spend a day at their major university or college campus wandering the buildings, opening doors and seeing what you can find behind them.

  3. And, if you haven’t visited the university or college campus in your city for a long time (or ever) you should think of doing so as they probably have some great things to see – rare books, public art, gallery/ museum exhibitions, architecture, gardens etc. 

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