Calgary's SoBow Trail: One Of The Best River Banks In North America!

I bet you have never heard of Calgary’s SoBow Trail? That’s probably because it isn’t an official trail, but it should be.  What is the SoBow Trail, you ask? It is the 12 km long south bank of the Bow River from Edworthy Park to Harvie Passage. 

While some of the land acquisition started in middle of the 20th century, the transformation of the Bow River’s south bank into an urban gem has accelerated over the past 25, to become an amazing collection of 20+ parks, plazas, pathways and bridges. 

In my estimation it has evolved into one of the best urban river banks in North America…maybe in the world. It is one of the reasons Caglary is the 5th best city to live in the world.

Don’t believe me? Read on…

The Bow River’s south bank as it enters the downtown’s western edge.

The Bow River’s south bank as it enters the downtown’s western edge.

No Master Plan 

To my knowledge, there hasn’t been a master plan for this development.  Rather, it’s been an organic evolution of several master plans - from Calgary Municipal Land Corporation’s River Walk and St. Patrick’s Island plans to the City of Calgary’s Prince’s Island master plan and West Eau Claire and Public Realm Plan.

It seems like every few years, a new public space has been added to the Bow River’s south bank. 

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Let’s Take A Walk Along The SoBow Trail

The 169 hectare Edworthy Park (which also includes the Douglas Fir Trail, the most easterly site that the Douglas Fir tree grow and historic Lawrey Gardens) at the western edge of Calgary’s city centre will be our starting point..  It has a popular natural pebble beach and is a popular family picnic spot with hundreds of firepits and BBQs.  The park, once part of the huge Cochrane Ranche, was purchased by Thomas Edworthy in 1883 for the Edworthy homestead that included not only the family farm but sandstone quarries and other agricultural activities. It was later purchased in 1962 by the City of Calgary for the development of a park at the edge of the city.

The 169 hectare Edworthy Park (which also includes the Douglas Fir Trail, the most easterly site that the Douglas Fir tree grow and historic Lawrey Gardens) at the western edge of Calgary’s city centre will be our starting point..

It has a popular natural pebble beach and is a popular family picnic spot with hundreds of firepits and BBQs.

The park, once part of the huge Cochrane Ranche, was purchased by Thomas Edworthy in 1883 for the Edworthy homestead that included not only the family farm but sandstone quarries and other agricultural activities. It was later purchased in 1962 by the City of Calgary for the development of a park at the edge of the city.

The natural pebble beach at Edworthy Park.

The natural pebble beach at Edworthy Park.

John Lawrey settled in the area Calgary in 1882 buying the land east of Edworthy’s where he created a market garden to provide fresh fruit and vegetables to the railway crews and other homesteaders. He died in 1904, but left the property to his nephews who continued to farm the land until the end of World War 1.  Today, it is a natural area with forest, meadows, ponds and a spectacular gravel bar that lets you walk out to the middle of the river.

John Lawrey settled in the area Calgary in 1882 buying the land east of Edworthy’s where he created a market garden to provide fresh fruit and vegetables to the railway crews and other homesteaders. He died in 1904, but left the property to his nephews who continued to farm the land until the end of World War 1.

Today, it is a natural area with forest, meadows, ponds and a spectacular gravel bar that lets you walk out to the middle of the river.

The huge gravel bar in the Bow River is a popular spot for people to create rock formations like this one.

The huge gravel bar in the Bow River is a popular spot for people to create rock formations like this one.

As you continue walking east and you will discover a hidden sculpture park and beach volleyball courts. You have arrived at Pumphouse Park whose name pays tribute to the , Bow River Pumphouse No. which was an integral part of the City’s water supply system form 1913 to 1933.

As you continue walking east and you will discover a hidden sculpture park and beach volleyball courts. You have arrived at Pumphouse Park whose name pays tribute to the , Bow River Pumphouse No. which was an integral part of the City’s water supply system form 1913 to 1933.

Keep going east and you will walk under the Crowchild Trail bridge where you will find the charming Dave Freeze pedestrian bridge.

Keep going east and you will walk under the Crowchild Trail bridge where you will find the charming Dave Freeze pedestrian bridge.

Continue eastward, go under the 14th Street bridge and you arrive at Nat Christie Park, a narrow strip of land between the pathway and 4th Avenue SW, that has been converted into a sculpture park. Here sits about a dozen artworks carved by members of the Stone Sculptures Guild of North America using local 60,000 year old Paskapoo sandstone. The Park is a legacy of the Group’s symposium held on Prince’s Island in 1998.

Continue eastward, go under the 14th Street bridge and you arrive at Nat Christie Park, a narrow strip of land between the pathway and 4th Avenue SW, that has been converted into a sculpture park. Here sits about a dozen artworks carved by members of the Stone Sculptures Guild of North America using local 60,000 year old Paskapoo sandstone. The Park is a legacy of the Group’s symposium held on Prince’s Island in 1998.

And just across the street is Shaw Millennium Park, a popular festival site and home to one of the largest public skateparks in the world - at 75,000 square feet. Other amenities include basketball and beach volleyball courts.

And just across the street is Shaw Millennium Park, a popular festival site and home to one of the largest public skateparks in the world - at 75,000 square feet. Other amenities include basketball and beach volleyball courts.

Here too you will notice the dome of the old Centennial Planetarium (designed by Calgary architectural firm McMillan Long and Associates in 1967) which recently reopened as a contemporary art gallery with plans for a major expansion and renovation.

Here too you will notice the dome of the old Centennial Planetarium (designed by Calgary architectural firm McMillan Long and Associates in 1967) which recently reopened as a contemporary art gallery with plans for a major expansion and renovation.

There is also the historic red bricked Mewata Armoury building built between 1915 and 1918. It is still home to local Militia Units, chiefly The  King's Own Calgary Regiment (RCAC)  and  The Calgary Highlanders , but also 15 (Edmonton) Field Ambulance Detachment Calgary, the 41 Canadian Brigade Group Influence Activities Company (attached to The King's Own Calgary Regiment (RCAC)) and various cadet organizations.

There is also the historic red bricked Mewata Armoury building built between 1915 and 1918. It is still home to local Militia Units, chiefly The King's Own Calgary Regiment (RCAC) and The Calgary Highlanders, but also 15 (Edmonton) Field Ambulance Detachment Calgary, the 41 Canadian Brigade Group Influence Activities Company (attached to The King's Own Calgary Regiment (RCAC)) and various cadet organizations.

But let’s keep going as there is lots more to see.  

Soon, we you’ll arrive at the historic Louise Bridge built in 1921 and named after Louise Cushing, the daughter of William Henry Cushing, Calgary’s Mayor from 1900 to 1901 (yes, just one year). Under the bridge is The Wave, where the Bow River current creates a natural wave perfect for river surfing. The Alberta River Surfing Association is working with Calgary-based Surf Anywhere to develop the area a world class river surfing park.

Soon, we you’ll arrive at the historic Louise Bridge built in 1921 and named after Louise Cushing, the daughter of William Henry Cushing, Calgary’s Mayor from 1900 to 1901 (yes, just one year). Under the bridge is The Wave, where the Bow River current creates a natural wave perfect for river surfing. The Alberta River Surfing Association is working with Calgary-based Surf Anywhere to develop the area a world class river surfing park.

A bit further and you are at new West Eau Claire Park at the south entrance to the iconic Peace Bridge designed (the latter by world renowned bridge designer Santiago Calatrava).  The $10.6 million park (30% of the budget was used for flood mitigation) designed by Calgary’s O2 Planning + Design is meant to simulate a river delta with cyclist, runners, walkers and now e-scooters being the “water” flowing off the Peace River onto the Bow River pathway using different streams.  The park also contains a subtle public artwork was created by Calgary-based artists Caitlind R.C Brown and Wayne Garrett who installed 12,000 brass “survey monuments” i.e. loonie sized brass coins throughout the delta each have simple messages collected by asking Calgarians along the pathway “where they are going or where they want to be?”

A bit further and you are at new West Eau Claire Park at the south entrance to the iconic Peace Bridge designed (the latter by world renowned bridge designer Santiago Calatrava).

The $10.6 million park (30% of the budget was used for flood mitigation) designed by Calgary’s O2 Planning + Design is meant to simulate a river delta with cyclist, runners, walkers and now e-scooters being the “water” flowing off the Peace River onto the Bow River pathway using different streams.

The park also contains a subtle public artwork was created by Calgary-based artists Caitlind R.C Brown and Wayne Garrett who installed 12,000 brass “survey monuments” i.e. loonie sized brass coins throughout the delta each have simple messages collected by asking Calgarians along the pathway “where they are going or where they want to be?”

You’ll also find here a new pebble beach with lovely lounge chairs to sit and watch the river flow by. It truly is a special place and a good example of how sophisticated Calgary’s urban design has become in the 21st century. The beach offers the perfect view of the Peace Bridge.

You’ll also find here a new pebble beach with lovely lounge chairs to sit and watch the river flow by. It truly is a special place and a good example of how sophisticated Calgary’s urban design has become in the 21st century. The beach offers the perfect view of the Peace Bridge.

The promenade from the West Eau Claire Park to Eau Claire Plaza is popular with Calgarians of all ages and background. Recently mega long benches were added as part of the new flood mitigation design.

The promenade from the West Eau Claire Park to Eau Claire Plaza is popular with Calgarians of all ages and background. Recently mega long benches were added as part of the new flood mitigation design.

But time to move on – and only a few strides away from the formal entrance to Prince’s Island and Eau Claire Plaza. Prince’s Island Park is named after Peter Prince who, in 1886, built the Eau Claire Lumber Mill at this site. He dug a channel in the river to bring the logs from the Bow River to the mill. The channel is now the Prince’s Island lagoon and it was instrumental in converting what was once a migrating gravel bar to more permanent island, resulting in the creation of the park. The City purchased the land from the Prince family in 1947 for a park.  The Park hosts many festivals not the least of which is Calgary’s International Folk Festival. As well you’ll discover the Chevron Learning Pathway, a small sculpture park and one of Calgary’s oldest and best restaurants - River Café. Urban Epicentre

But time to move on – and only a few strides away from the formal entrance to Prince’s Island and Eau Claire Plaza. Prince’s Island Park is named after Peter Prince who, in 1886, built the Eau Claire Lumber Mill at this site. He dug a channel in the river to bring the logs from the Bow River to the mill. The channel is now the Prince’s Island lagoon and it was instrumental in converting what was once a migrating gravel bar to more permanent island, resulting in the creation of the park. The City purchased the land from the Prince family in 1947 for a park.

The Park hosts many festivals not the least of which is Calgary’s International Folk Festival. As well you’ll discover the Chevron Learning Pathway, a small sculpture park and one of Calgary’s oldest and best restaurants - River Café. Urban Epicentre

Prince’s Island lagoon is a popular place to sit especially when the Calgary Folk Festival is happening on the island.

Prince’s Island lagoon is a popular place to sit especially when the Calgary Folk Festival is happening on the island.

Eau Claire Plaza, developed in the early 90s as park of Eau Claire Market is also home to numerous festivals and events including A Taste of Calgary food festival. It also has a popular wading pool and spray park for young families. It is the gateway into the downtown.

Eau Claire Plaza, developed in the early 90s as park of Eau Claire Market is also home to numerous festivals and events including A Taste of Calgary food festival. It also has a popular wading pool and spray park for young families. It is the gateway into the downtown.

Just a few steps eastward and you encounter a large propeller-like artifact the middle of the pathway. Indeed it is a propeller from a nameless arctic ship. The plaque explains that the propeller which served many years in the Arctic was donated to the City of Calgary by the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME) in 1993 to commemorate the fact that Arctic section of SNAME, was started in Calgary in 1980 to support arctic oil and gas exploration.

Just a few steps eastward and you encounter a large propeller-like artifact the middle of the pathway. Indeed it is a propeller from a nameless arctic ship. The plaque explains that the propeller which served many years in the Arctic was donated to the City of Calgary by the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME) in 1993 to commemorate the fact that Arctic section of SNAME, was started in Calgary in 1980 to support arctic oil and gas exploration.

Prince’s Island sculpture park.

Prince’s Island sculpture park.

Prince’s Island lagoon with Jaipur Bridge. The Jaipur Bridge which links the Eau Claire Plaza to Prince’s Island, was built in 1968 to honour Calgary’s sister city in India. Plans are currently being developed to replace the bridge in 2020 to accommodate the increased traffic.

Prince’s Island lagoon with Jaipur Bridge. The Jaipur Bridge which links the Eau Claire Plaza to Prince’s Island, was built in 1968 to honour Calgary’s sister city in India. Plans are currently being developed to replace the bridge in 2020 to accommodate the increased traffic.

Next stop - Sien Lok Park on the northern edge of Chinatown. This park, created in 1982 is Chinatown’s only green space. The cone-shaped sculpture in the middle of it, titled “In Search of Gold Mountain,” was sculpted by Chu Honsun using 15 tonnes of granite from Hopei Province in China. The park has several other interesting artworks and two majestic Chinese Lions. The park is very popular with the Canadian Geese, so be careful where you walk or sit!

Next stop - Sien Lok Park on the northern edge of Chinatown. This park, created in 1982 is Chinatown’s only green space. The cone-shaped sculpture in the middle of it, titled “In Search of Gold Mountain,” was sculpted by Chu Honsun using 15 tonnes of granite from Hopei Province in China. The park has several other interesting artworks and two majestic Chinese Lions. The park is very popular with the Canadian Geese, so be careful where you walk or sit!

The iconic 1916 Centre Street Bridge with its lions modelled after the bronze lions at Trafalgar Square, London, and then to the popular Jack & Jean Leslie RiverWalk, which winds its way along the Bow River’s edge to where it meets the Elbow River.

The iconic 1916 Centre Street Bridge with its lions modelled after the bronze lions at Trafalgar Square, London, and then to the popular Jack & Jean Leslie RiverWalk, which winds its way along the Bow River’s edge to where it meets the Elbow River.

As you pass under the Centre Street bridge don’t miss the decorative Chinatown fence.

As you pass under the Centre Street bridge don’t miss the decorative Chinatown fence.

As you stroll along the RiverWalk, you will also pass by the 1910 Reconciliation Bridge, originally named the Langevin Bridge after Hector-Louis Langevin, a founder of Canada’s confederation and one of the architects of the nefarious residential schools. It was decided in 2017, as part of Canada’s attempt to reconcile the injustices done to First Nation peoples to rename the bridge. The bridge is beautiful in the evening when it is lit up.

As you stroll along the RiverWalk, you will also pass by the 1910 Reconciliation Bridge, originally named the Langevin Bridge after Hector-Louis Langevin, a founder of Canada’s confederation and one of the architects of the nefarious residential schools. It was decided in 2017, as part of Canada’s attempt to reconcile the injustices done to First Nation peoples to rename the bridge. The bridge is beautiful in the evening when it is lit up.

East Village Renaissance

Continuing along the way you will find several lookout platforms, street art and sculptures before arriving at the historic Simmons Building, where you can get a Calgary-roasted Phil & Sebastian coffee, a tasty sandwich, something sweeter at Sidewalk Citizen Bakery, or an upscale meal at Charbar, which has a spectacular rooftop patio offering great views of the Bow River.     

Immediately east of the Simmons building, sits the George C. King Bridge, sometimes called the skipping stone bridge, as its arches remind some of a stone skipping across the water.  Cross the bridge and you will discover the exquisite St. Patrick’s Island that has been a public space since the 1880s.  Today it has popular man-made pebble beach, playground, picnic and play areas and public art.  It is a popular spot for those floating the river to end their trip.   

RiverWalk as seen from the Charbar roof-top patio.

RiverWalk as seen from the Charbar roof-top patio.

East Village is an outdoor gallery with numerous sculptures and street artworks.

East Village is an outdoor gallery with numerous sculptures and street artworks.

George C. King bridge aka Skipping Stone Bridge connects the SoBow Trail with St. Patrick’s Island.

George C. King bridge aka Skipping Stone Bridge connects the SoBow Trail with St. Patrick’s Island.

RiverWalk Plaza is a popular meeting and lingering place.

RiverWalk Plaza is a popular meeting and lingering place.

St. Patrick’s Island’s pebble beach.

St. Patrick’s Island’s pebble beach.

Bow & Elbow Confluence

But let’s keep going, as the confluence of the Bow and Elbow Rivers awaits you. This is where  Calgary was first settled in 1875 by the North West Mounted Police, who built Fort Calgary which grew into the Calgary Barracks and by 1914, a flourishing city was developing.  The site eventually became an industrial area for the Canadian National Railway until 1974 when the City bought the site and in 1978, the Fort Calgary Interpretive Center opened.   

In 2006 a three-phase revitalization and redevelopment plan was adopted.  The first phase involving the restoration of the Deane house (one of Calgary’s best fine dining spots), restoration of the Hunt House and Metis Cabin (which was moved back to its original location from Calgary Brewery sit) have been completed. Phase 2, an interpretive art piece by Jill Anholt that references the walls of the original fort is also completed. Phase 3, currently underway includes an upgrade to the current museum and renovations of the 1888 Barracks. 

But let’s not linger too long as we still have 5 km to go.  Cross the Elbow River Traverse Bridge (opened in 2014) into Inglewood, Calgary’s oldest community, which today has many century old homes interspersed with modern new infills.  

Fort Calgary Barracks

Fort Calgary Barracks

Don’t be surprise if you find some people fishing in the river.

Don’t be surprise if you find some people fishing in the river.

You will also encounter a major bronze sculpture titled “Mountie on Horseback” done by Harry O’Hanlon in 1995 for Fort Calgary but moved to this site in 2015. It is placed high-up on a plinth giving the Mountie a commanding view Fort Calgary the birthplace of Calgary.

You will also encounter a major bronze sculpture titled “Mountie on Horseback” done by Harry O’Hanlon in 1995 for Fort Calgary but moved to this site in 2015. It is placed high-up on a plinth giving the Mountie a commanding view Fort Calgary the birthplace of Calgary.

Keep walking east and soon you will be at the new Zoo Bridge (opened 2017) that takes to the St. George’s Island and the Calgary Zoo and Botanical Gardens.

Keep walking east and soon you will be at the new Zoo Bridge (opened 2017) that takes to the St. George’s Island and the Calgary Zoo and Botanical Gardens.

However we are heading east, but not before checking out “The Wolfe and Sparrows” sculpture by Brandon Vickerd, a piece inspired by the 1898 statue of General James Wolfe sculpture by John Massey in Calgary’s Mount Royal community. From a distance, it looks like a typical realistic figurative bronze figure, but get up close to see \ the top of the sculpture is actually a flock of sparrows. The piece was conceived based on many conversations with community members who wanted something historical, yet contemporary. (Ironically General Wolfe never visited Calgary and his fame as the victorious British general in the Plains of Abraham in Quebec City in 1759 has nothing to do with Calgary. In 1759, the confluence of the Bow and Elbow River was a temporary summer meeting place for local First Nations.)

However we are heading east, but not before checking out “The Wolfe and Sparrows” sculpture by Brandon Vickerd, a piece inspired by the 1898 statue of General James Wolfe sculpture by John Massey in Calgary’s Mount Royal community. From a distance, it looks like a typical realistic figurative bronze figure, but get up close to see \ the top of the sculpture is actually a flock of sparrows. The piece was conceived based on many conversations with community members who wanted something historical, yet contemporary. (Ironically General Wolfe never visited Calgary and his fame as the victorious British general in the Plains of Abraham in Quebec City in 1759 has nothing to do with Calgary. In 1759, the confluence of the Bow and Elbow River was a temporary summer meeting place for local First Nations.)

Heading further east will take you through a nature area and eventual to Pearce Estate Park. This park, situated at the point where the Bow River takes a sharp turn south, is home to a large reconstructed wetland, as well as the Sam Livingston Fish Hatchery and the Bow Habitat Visitor Centre.  A trout pond allows kids to try their hand at fishing, while the Discovery Centre’s aquariums where allow you to come eye-to-eye with over 20 of Alberta’s fish species, as well as other educational displays and a theatre.

Heading further east will take you through a nature area and eventual to Pearce Estate Park. This park, situated at the point where the Bow River takes a sharp turn south, is home to a large reconstructed wetland, as well as the Sam Livingston Fish Hatchery and the Bow Habitat Visitor Centre.

A trout pond allows kids to try their hand at fishing, while the Discovery Centre’s aquariums where allow you to come eye-to-eye with over 20 of Alberta’s fish species, as well as other educational displays and a theatre.

Proceed further and you find yourself at the 36-hectare Inglewood Bird Sanctuary where you can wander and see how many of the 270 different birds known to frequent the area (Bald Eagles and Osprey) you can find. The Nature Centre is currently being expanded with completion expected in September 2020.

Proceed further and you find yourself at the 36-hectare Inglewood Bird Sanctuary where you can wander and see how many of the 270 different birds known to frequent the area (Bald Eagles and Osprey) you can find. The Nature Centre is currently being expanded with completion expected in September 2020.

The Sanctuary also includes the 1910 house of Colonel Walker, an officer of the first NWMP detachment that came to Calgary, who became one of the most influential civic figures in the City’s early years. He was declared Calgary’s “Citizen of the Century” in 1975. “Inglewood” was Walker’s name for his home and the moniker was soon applied by the public to the surrounding community.

The Sanctuary also includes the 1910 house of Colonel Walker, an officer of the first NWMP detachment that came to Calgary, who became one of the most influential civic figures in the City’s early years. He was declared Calgary’s “Citizen of the Century” in 1975. “Inglewood” was Walker’s name for his home and the moniker was soon applied by the public to the surrounding community.

The final destination is the Harvie Passage, a world-class white water passage recently rebuilt after the 2013 flood destroyed it. It now has two channels - one a low-water channel for inexperienced or novice rafters and paddlers and a high-water channel for experienced users. It is a place to see young kids developing their skills and Olympic calibre athletes perfecting theirs.

The final destination is the Harvie Passage, a world-class white water passage recently rebuilt after the 2013 flood destroyed it. It now has two channels - one a low-water channel for inexperienced or novice rafters and paddlers and a high-water channel for experienced users. It is a place to see young kids developing their skills and Olympic calibre athletes perfecting theirs.

And don’t miss the impressive public artwork by Lorna Jordan. Titled “Bow Passage Outlook,” it looks like a bunch of railway ties tossed on a hill. Kids love climbing the sculpture; couples and families love to sit on the beams, which if you climb to the top, offers a great view at the top of the majestic Bow River.

And don’t miss the impressive public artwork by Lorna Jordan. Titled “Bow Passage Outlook,” it looks like a bunch of railway ties tossed on a hill. Kids love climbing the sculpture; couples and families love to sit on the beams, which if you climb to the top, offers a great view at the top of the majestic Bow River.

The City of Calgary has a master plan called “Bend in the Bow” that will integrate the Inglewood Bird Sanctuary, the Inglewood Wildlands, Pierce Estate Park, River Passage Park and Harvie Passage into one regional park. 

Last Word

The SoBow Trail is indeed a special place that deserves to be named and officially recognized as one of the best and most unique urban experiences in North America. It should be up there with San Antonio’s River Walk as a tourist attraction.

I love how SoBow Trail includes elements of Calgary’s past and present to create an urban sense of place within a nature setting. It is not a tacky contrived Disneyesque park, but something authentic and unique to Calgary. 

It’s high time to start promoting the SoBow Trail to locals and tourists alike as a “must do” fun day activity.

See YOU on the SoBow Trail….

See YOU on the SoBow Trail….

List of SoBow Parks, Plaza, Bridges etc: 

  1. Edworthy Park

  2. Douglas Fir Trail 

  3. Lawrey Gardens

  4. Pumphill Park

  5. Nat Christie Sculpture Park

  6. Shaw Millennium Park

  7. Contemporary Calgary 

  8. Louise Bridge

  9. The Wave

  10. West Eau Claire Park

  11. Peace Bridge 

  12. Prince’s Island Park 

  13. Eau Claire Plaza

  14. Sien Lok Park

  15. Centre Street Bridge

  16. Jean & Jean Leslie River Walk

  17. Reconciliation Bridge

  18. RiverWalk Plaza

  19. George King Bridge

  20. St. Patrick’s Island 

  21. Fort Calgary

  22. Elbow River Traverse Bridge

  23. St. George’s Island / Zoo

  24. Pearce Estate Park

  25. Inglewood Bridge Sanctuary

  26. Harvie Passage 

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

A Brief History Of The Bow River Islands

Calgary: Saturday Afternoon Bike Ride Fun

Calgary: City of pedestrian bridges

Calgary residential developers upping the “fun factor" for millennials!

Calgary’s City Centre residential market is very competitive these days, which means developers are looking for ways to differentiate their new project from others.  One method is to offer the latest and greatest amenities. 

For example, Calgary-based developer Battistella lists one of the amenities at their new condo project, “NUDE” is a “Community Coordinator.” 

SODO’s party room has all the elements of a cool lounge.

SODO’s party room has all the elements of a cool lounge.

While there are no specific images of NUDE’s amenities on their website, here is what they are promising.

While there are no specific images of NUDE’s amenities on their website, here is what they are promising.

Computer rendering of new Annex in Kensington condo’s rooftop amenities.

Computer rendering of new Annex in Kensington condo’s rooftop amenities.

Lifestyle Curator?

Not to be outdone, The Underwood on First Street SW next to Haultain Park will be hiring a “Lifestyle Curator,” aka concierge to book reservations at restaurants, get theatre tickets, collect deliveries and give tips on what to see and do in the city. 

While the concept of residential developers providing a “community coordinator” might seem like it is a new idea, luxury condos have, for decades, had doorman who offered some of these services.  Leanne Woodward, The Underwood’s manager notes even with new amenity rich developments “if you visit them not long after occupation, the amenities will almost always be underutilized and, if used, used individually rather than in a community sense.”  

As a result, The Underwood will be much more proactive in managing its amenities.  Woodward says, “we will engage personal trainers who will come to site to show residents how to use the equipment and create a fitness plan and yoga teachers to teach classes. Our entertainment lounge will host tenant appreciation parties, be available for private parties, but also rotating life seminar classes such as how to invest, tax tips during tax season, wine tasting from local merchants.” 

She adds, “the lifestyle curator’s role is to create a community within the building, to curate what the residents need to make their home into a community for all. The lifestyle curator will create blogs on the interactive tenant portal, curates gatherings, arranges specialized services when necessary and promote community and vitality throughout the building. The secondary role is to assist residents on an individual basis with parcel deliveries, recommendations for dining, transportation, hotel bookings, dry cleaning drop off and similar

Creating a strong sense of community, be it in a building, or in the ‘hood, is also evident in East Village where Calgary Municipal Land Corporation (who is managing East Village’s mega makeover) has three staff who help organize and promote everything from yoga to concerts, from pop-up events to this summer’s Bounce - a funky basketball court on an empty lot.  All in an attempt to foster a stronger sense of community.  University District staff are also busy organizing events to attract people to come and see what is happening in their new community and help new residents meet their neighbours.   

CMLC staff manage a very active year round program of activities for people of all ages which they promote heavily on social media.

CMLC staff manage a very active year round program of activities for people of all ages which they promote heavily on social media.

University District is also very active promoting its events on social media.

University District is also very active promoting its events on social media.

 Huge Market

Today, there are more than 7 million millennials (defined as those born between 1981 and 1996) in Canada. A 2018 Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation survey found millennials make up half of all first time homebuyers in Canada. Currently, about 300,000 millennials call Calgary home.

Given the condo is the new starter home, the millennial demographic is a huge market for condo developers.

In a 2017 Stanford University Press blog, Bob Kulhan (adjunct professor at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and Columbia Business School, and the Founder and CEO of Business Improv) says, “millennials just want to have fun.” 

Indeed, many millennials have had their lives curated for them since infancy. Many have never had a summer off to hang out on their own and make their own fun with neighbour kids. They went to week-long camps all summer – science, computer, sports, music, art etc. Their parents organized their lives to maximize their fun from cradle to condo.  

So, it’s logical for Calgary multi-family residential developers to change how they not only design their suites, but also what amenities they provide to make living in their buildings more fun. 

N3 rooftop patio with BBQs, seating and great views of downtown and mountains.

N3 rooftop patio with BBQs, seating and great views of downtown and mountains.

Mark on 10th rooftop patio includes a hot tub.

Mark on 10th rooftop patio includes a hot tub.

SODO’s communal kitchen area.

SODO’s communal kitchen area.

Mark on 10th penthouse lounge is like a huge communal living room where you can easily mix and mingle with your neighbours.

Mark on 10th penthouse lounge is like a huge communal living room where you can easily mix and mingle with your neighbours.

More Like Hotels  

Many of the new City Centre residential developments are being designed with hotel-like amenities – meeting rooms, gyms, party rooms, hot tubs and yes, a concierge - something only available in luxury condos in the past.    

For example, when Qualex Landmark found penthouse units didn’t sell well in Calgary, they designed their Mark on 10thproject (opened in 2016) with its top floor being an amenity space for use by all residents.  With a hot tub, BBQ, kitchen and a huge lounge where everyone can mix, mingle and party. And, it offers some of the best mountain and downtown views in the city.  It is a great place to chill, meet your neighbours or host a party that will impress your friends.  

Today, it is common practice for mid and high-rise residential buildings in Calgary to have roof-top amenities.  

Bucci Development’s recently completed Radius in Bridgeland offers 16,000 square feet of amenities including separate studios for yoga/barre, spin, weight and cardio training with state of the art equipment. It also offers the “SPUD” room, a common pantry that allows residents to order groceries online (at SPUD.ca) and have them delivered any day of the week.  In addition, its 8,000 square foot roof-top patio is like having your own private pocket park. 

SODO, another recently completed residential development on 10thAvenue SW in the Beltline has 38,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor amenities.  On the fifth floor is a demonstration kitchen with a wine chiller and Nespresso coffee bar, as well as a Games Room with a huge pool table, 70” TV and a built in retro ‘60s arcade game system. Who needs to go to the sports bar? There is also a fully quipped gym.  Outside are several BBQs, lots of lounge chairs and even a dog run.  

This is SODO’s lobby, it could easily be mistaken for a hotel lobby.

This is SODO’s lobby, it could easily be mistaken for a hotel lobby.

Radius condo includes not only a well equipped gym, but also a yoga studio.

Radius condo includes not only a well equipped gym, but also a yoga studio.

Laptop Generation 

Joe Starkman, CEO at Knightsbridge Homes who built the four University City condos calls millennials the “laptop generation” as they do everything on their laps. They don’t need space for a big TV as they watch Netflix and YouTube on their laptops or iPads, more than mainstream TV.  They don’t need big kitchens as they eat takeout on their laps while listening to music. They don’t need space for a big stereo system complete with monster speakers as they use tiny wireless ear pieces or headphones.  The phone is the new stereo.  

He also says they like to entertain and have a large circle of friends making an open concept kitchen, dining, living space a must.  Used to having their own bedroom and bathroom, a luxury master bedroom with spa-like bathroom is also important in attracting millennials.  

SODO’s modern open kitchen design is perfect for hosting friends.

SODO’s modern open kitchen design is perfect for hosting friends.

Last Word

What’s next? One City Centre high-rise residential developer is looking at either a craft brewery or distillery on site, perhaps even a small Food Hall with several micro food kiosks – think coffee, ice cream, tacos, sushi and donuts.  

21stcentury urban development is all about creating fun entertainment experiences and conveniences. And developers are fully aware that these don’t just appeal to millennials. Empty nesters are attracted by these too! 

Note: An edited version of this blog, was published in the Calgary Herald’s New Condo section on Saturday, June 29th 2019.

If you like this book you will like these links:

Calgary vs Vancouver: Affordability & Liveability

New Condos Help Kensington Thrive

Calgary Condos: A Pop Of Colour

 

 

 

Calgary better than Vancouver for cycling?

“A friend emailed me your Calgary Herald article about the Beltline vs West End just now, and I loved it. While some might think your article pretty kind to the Beltline, I'd back your thesis that Calgary’s City Center communities are both very affordable and attractive compared to other major North American cities like Vancouver.” Roy Brander (Everyday Tourist reader)

He then goes on to say what makes Calgary’s City Centre so attractive is “the cycling is better than in Vancouver.”

Link: Calgary vs Vancouver: Affordability & Livability

It is a bit of free-for-all along Vancouver’s pathways says Everyday Tourist reader Roy Brander (photo credit: Roy Brander)

It is a bit of free-for-all along Vancouver’s pathways says Everyday Tourist reader Roy Brander (photo credit: Roy Brander)

Brander much prefers Calgary’s City Centre pathways because they are less busy and have separated pathways for cyclists and pedestrians in many cases. (photo credit: Roy Brander)

Brander much prefers Calgary’s City Centre pathways because they are less busy and have separated pathways for cyclists and pedestrians in many cases. (photo credit: Roy Brander)

Calgary’s City Centre Cycling network includes both dedicated bike lanes and multi-purpose pathways.

Calgary’s City Centre Cycling network includes both dedicated bike lanes and multi-purpose pathways.

Brander says…

From 2008 to 2012, my commute from Montgomery to the Water Centre in Manchester was through the Beltline.  So, I watched the Beltline grow up from just a few shops and bars to something that reminds me very much of Vancouver’s West End. I now live in Vancouver’s West End across the street from Stanley Park so I have a good appreciation of both.

As you stated the Beltline is "landlocked," not because of its lack of access to a waterfront, but also it has no easy access to a big park like Stanley Park, those who live in Vancouver West End do.  But there is a huge benefit to living in Calgary’s City Centre that I'm coming to appreciate more and more - the cycling.

Yes, Calgary’s City Centre is a better place to cycle than Vancouver’s!

For the most part, Calgarians seem to be able to share the river pathways.

For the most part, Calgarians seem to be able to share the river pathways.

Calgary’s City Centre river pathways are popular weekdays and weekends.

Calgary’s City Centre river pathways are popular weekdays and weekends.

Calgary’s City Centre pathways are child-friendly.

Calgary’s City Centre pathways are child-friendly.

Calgary’s pathways can get busy especially in the Eau Claire and East Village areas.

Calgary’s pathways can get busy especially in the Eau Claire and East Village areas.

What, am I mad? 

Vancouver is so pro-cycling.  How could Calgary be better?  What I miss is working up a sweat, which is not easy in Vancouver’s City Centre, especially starting from the West End.   Cycling in Stanley Park and along the famous seawall, from Canada Place to Stanley Park and around False Creek is frustrating - there isn’t enough capacity to handle all of the traffic. Meandering around tourists and recreational cyclists and pedestrians,means you are lucky if you can go 10 km/hr. 

Sure, one can work up a sweat going up and down hills in Stanley Park, but I quickly tired of it - Stanley Park is just over one square mile, and the cycling paths are few and far between - just a few kilometres.

By contrast, Calgary’s Bow and Elbow River pathways have the capacity to allow for cyclists to average 25 km/hr for most of their commute without endangering others. FYI, I often would stay late to avoid the rush hour cyclists and pedestrians.  My commute from Shouldice Park (through Lowery Gardens) to the Water Centre involved not a single light and rarely dropped below 20 km/hr. I arrived grinning at both work and home every day.

Calgary's pathway system is a remarkable achievement.   

While Calgary has just these two “thin strips” of water, nothing compared to Vancouver having the Fraser, False Creek, Burrard Inlet, and the Pacific Freaking Ocean, they have absolutely maximized the contact a Calgarian can enjoy with a green, fragrant river valley in a dry land that is brown for much of the year.

Because of our free place at my mother-in-law's place in Calgary’s Shawnee community, I still spend weeks at a time in Calgary, and last fall bought an "ebike" and I simply love it.  I still get the same workout, it doesn't make you lazy - it just allows a cyclist to cover more ground.   

I'm starting to question why would I bring my ebike to Vancouver because an ebike is best at covering long distances which Calgary’s pathway system allows.  When I visit Calgary now, I love taking 40 or 50 km trips from Shawnee to downtown and points north. Calgary, with all its hills, is perfect for an ebike - way better than Vancouver.   

I can hardly believe I said that.  Somewhere in Vancouver City Hall, a bike infrastructure coordinator is crying.

During my recent March/April stay in Vancouver, I didn’t find their pathways as busy as I thought they would be. This is a nice Sunday afternoon in Coal Harbour.

During my recent March/April stay in Vancouver, I didn’t find their pathways as busy as I thought they would be. This is a nice Sunday afternoon in Coal Harbour.

While the pathway near Canada Place was busy, there was still lots of room for everyone. However, I did notice there weren't a lot of cyclists, so maybe they just avoid the waterfront pathways.

While the pathway near Canada Place was busy, there was still lots of room for everyone. However, I did notice there weren't a lot of cyclists, so maybe they just avoid the waterfront pathways.

In My Opinion (Roy’s)

With the plans to redevelop Stampede Park, Beltline residents on the east side will have better access to the Elbow River pathway and those on the west side aren’t that far from Bow River pathway.  For most Beltliners, this means 7 months a year they can be on the pathway system in minutes and enjoy an experience that rivals Vancouver’s Stanley Park or Seawall for fragrance, green space and the sounds of moving water.

Richard, If you aren't a cyclist, partner with one and do an article on Calgary’s pathway system - it's a jewel!

When in Atlanta in the April 2018, I was shocked at the traffic along their Beltline pathway system. Its was the first time I have ever felt unsafe as a pedestrian. Cyclist when whipping by without any notice, Brenda was so uncomfortable she turned back after just 15 minutes. Unfortunately cyclist and pedestrians don’t mix well when multi-use pathways get busy.

When in Atlanta in the April 2018, I was shocked at the traffic along their Beltline pathway system. Its was the first time I have ever felt unsafe as a pedestrian. Cyclist when whipping by without any notice, Brenda was so uncomfortable she turned back after just 15 minutes. Unfortunately cyclist and pedestrians don’t mix well when multi-use pathways get busy.

Sunday afternoon on Atlanta’s Beltline pathway is chaos.

Sunday afternoon on Atlanta’s Beltline pathway is chaos.

Pedestrians in Calgary like to walk side-by-side while chatting often taking up the entire pathway and frustrating cyclists.

Pedestrians in Calgary like to walk side-by-side while chatting often taking up the entire pathway and frustrating cyclists.

Everyday Tourist Note:

While not an avid cyclist, I am a “fearless” cyclist (as defined in the City of Calgary’s 2011 Cycling Strategy (see chart below) as I am just as comfortable riding on city roads as I am on the pathways. I once cycled from Mount Royal University to my home in West Hillhurst via Crowchild Trail and would do it again if need be. 

I also do have family and friends in Calgary who are avid cyclists with at least one owning an ebike and have heard similar comments i.e. Calgary’s multi-use pathway system makes urban living in Calgary very attractive.  

Ironically, on the same day I got this email from Vancouver, I also received an email from a friend who was cycling with his son in New York City and he too said Calgary has a much better pathway system than NYC. This might surprise some, as NYC like Vancouver, is considered to be a leader in cycling infrastructure.

I realize Calgary’s pathway system and cycling infrastructure isn’t perfect, especially when it comes to sharing the pathways between those who are using them as a means of transportation and those who are out for a recreational ride or walk. However, it is better than many would have you think. 

Hmmm…perhaps I was right when I did my blog title “Calgary: Canada’s Bike Friendly City!” back in 2013.  

Link: Calgary: Canada’s Bike Friendly City

 

From City of Calgary’s 2011 Cycling Strategy

From City of Calgary’s 2011 Cycling Strategy

If you like this blog you might want to read the Calgary Herald piece that was the catalyst for Brander’s email to me:

Link: Calgary Herald: Calgary Affordability & Liveability