Calgary: Neighbourhood Walkabout Postcards

One of our favourite things to do is take a walk in one of Calgary’s 200+ neighbourhoods…especially in the summer. I thought it would be fun to share some of the quirky, strange and fun things we have discovered on our neighbourhood adventures. Everything from little free libraries to birdhouses, from artworks to pathways and from doors to porches.

Hope you enjoy this virtual walkabout….

Southern Alberta Institute of Technology

Southern Alberta Institute of Technology

Hillhurst

Hillhurst

Beltline

Beltline

Downtown

Downtown

Bow River / Poppy Plaza

Bow River / Poppy Plaza

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

Parkdale

Parkdale

17th Ave SW

17th Ave SW

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

St Andrews Heights

St Andrews Heights

Hillhurst

Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

Altadore

Altadore

Inglewood

Inglewood

Bridgeland

Bridgeland

Bowness

Bowness

Hillhurst

Hillhurst

Beltline

Beltline

Eau Claire

Eau Claire

Downtown

Downtown

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

Bowness

Bowness

Mission

Mission

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Alberta Children’s Hospital

Alberta Children’s Hospital

Bankview

Bankview

Sunalta

Sunalta

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

Downtown

Downtown

Chinatown

Chinatown

Montgomery

Montgomery

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

Briar Hill

Briar Hill

Hillhurst

Hillhurst

Beltine

Beltine

Hillhurst

Hillhurst

Bridgeland

Bridgeland

Beltline

Beltline

Parkdale

Parkdale

Hillhurst

Hillhurst

Banff Trail

Banff Trail

Altadore

Altadore

Cliff Bungalow

Cliff Bungalow

Chinatown

Chinatown

Bowness

Bowness

Bankview

Bankview

Crescent Heights

Crescent Heights

Bridgeland

Bridgeland

Renfew

Renfew

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

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South Calgary

South Calgary

Altadore

Altadore

Inglewood

Inglewood

Parkdale

Parkdale

Montgomery

Montgomery

Sunalta

Sunalta

Altadore

Altadore

Parkdale

Parkdale

Bridgeland/Riverside

Bridgeland/Riverside

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

Inglewood

Inglewood

Beltline

Beltline

Renfrew

Renfrew

Downtown

Downtown

Beltline

Beltline

Banff Trail

Banff Trail

Inglewood

Inglewood

Briar Hill

Briar Hill

Inglewood

Inglewood

Eau Claire

Eau Claire

Beltline

Beltline

Hillhurst

Hillhurst

Riley Park

Riley Park

Parkdale

Parkdale

Hounsfield Heights

Hounsfield Heights

Bowness

Bowness

Bridgeland

Bridgeland

Briar Hill

Briar Hill

Briar Hill

Briar Hill

Inglewood

Inglewood

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

Beltline

Beltline

Hillhurst

Hillhurst

Ramsay

Ramsay

Mission

Mission

Confederation Park

Confederation Park

Pumphouse Theatre Park

Pumphouse Theatre Park

Bankview

Bankview

Hillhurst

Hillhurst

Pumphouse Theatre Park

Pumphouse Theatre Park

Crescent Heights

Crescent Heights

Parkdale

Parkdale

Renfrew

Renfrew

Banff Trail

Banff Trail

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

Crescent Heights

Crescent Heights

Sunalta

Sunalta

Downtown

Downtown

Sunalta

Sunalta

Sunalta

Sunalta

West Hillhurst

West Hillhurst

Last Word

Congratulations you made to the end of virtual walkabout. If you aren’t too tired and you’d like to walk through some more neighbourhoods here are few links that might interest you.

Forensic Walks In Calgary

Front Yard Fun

Sitting On The Porch

Everyday Live In Africa: Republic of Mali & the Republic of Côte d'Ivoire

This past winter I received hundreds of photos and detailed emails from Bob White (no relation) as he and his wife Anne explored remote villages in Africa for three months. The emails were fascinating as Bob shared with family and friends the trials and tribulations of travelling the back roads to get to “off the beaten path” places where they observe and capture the everyday life of Africans.

When they got back I asked if they would be interested in sharing some of their photos and experiences with Everyday Tourist blog readers as I know many of us have never been to Africa and if we have it probably wasn’t to the villages that they travelled to.

I am pleased they have agreed to share their experiences and insights with the Everyday Tourist community.

Travels with Anne & Bob

The border between Guinea and the Ivory Coast was closed during the Ebola crisis in 2014 and remained closed when we made our trip in 2016. We were forced to make a large detour into Mali before we could enter Guinea and continue our planned trip.

We stayed in the Ivory Coast resort town of Grand Bassam, where only a few months earlier three armed gunmen linked to al-Qaeda killed 19 tourists on the beach of this quiet town. We were more troubled and afraid of spending two days in this resort than our having to make a large diversion into Mali. 

 Fortunately, we had no problems during our time in the two countries, either from terrorists or Ebola.  We were welcomed and treated with friendship as was the norm during all our travels in West Africa.

Bob White

We hiked through the hills above the town of Siby, Mali to the Kamarjan Arch, a natural formation in the red sandstone cliffs. The arch and caves in the surrounding area have been used for animist and fetish religious rites for centuries.

We hiked through the hills above the town of Siby, Mali to the Kamarjan Arch, a natural formation in the red sandstone cliffs. The arch and caves in the surrounding area have been used for animist and fetish religious rites for centuries.

Women carrying their babies in slings on their backs is traditional throughout much of Africa. Women commonly clean, cook, shop and work at jobs while carrying their babies. The photo was taken in a roadside market south of Bamako, Mali.

Women carrying their babies in slings on their backs is traditional throughout much of Africa. Women commonly clean, cook, shop and work at jobs while carrying their babies. The photo was taken in a roadside market south of Bamako, Mali.

We took an early morning walk in the blocks around our hotel in the small city of Sikasso, Mali. A woman was doing a bustling business cooking up a sweet dough mix in a dimpled pan over a wood fire, a steady stream of locals bought the treats as quickly as she could cook them. We purchased a few and found they had a texture similar to a cake-style doughnut, and that they were delicious!

We took an early morning walk in the blocks around our hotel in the small city of Sikasso, Mali. A woman was doing a bustling business cooking up a sweet dough mix in a dimpled pan over a wood fire, a steady stream of locals bought the treats as quickly as she could cook them. We purchased a few and found they had a texture similar to a cake-style doughnut, and that they were delicious!

Our Lady of Peace Basilica, Yamoussoukro, Cote d’Ivoire   This huge church was built during the presidency of Felix Houphouët-Boigny, the first president of the Ivory Coast after independence from France in 1960. It can seat over 18,000 people, but normally draws only a couple of hundred for religious services in this mainly Muslim country. Houphouët-Boigny hoped that the basilica would become a pilgrimage site for African Catholics.

Our Lady of Peace Basilica, Yamoussoukro, Cote d’Ivoire

This huge church was built during the presidency of Felix Houphouët-Boigny, the first president of the Ivory Coast after independence from France in 1960. It can seat over 18,000 people, but normally draws only a couple of hundred for religious services in this mainly Muslim country. Houphouët-Boigny hoped that the basilica would become a pilgrimage site for African Catholics.

Anne Tapler White

Afternoon in the Mosque, Yamoussoukro, Cote d’Ivoire   We entered the Mosque which was quite large and spacious, cool and airy in the afternoon heat. The two girls were in a very intense conversion and did not notice my presence. What lead me to take the photo was how small they looked in such a large building.

Afternoon in the Mosque, Yamoussoukro, Cote d’Ivoire

We entered the Mosque which was quite large and spacious, cool and airy in the afternoon heat. The two girls were in a very intense conversion and did not notice my presence. What lead me to take the photo was how small they looked in such a large building.

Leading the Blind, Bouake, Cote d’Ivoire   We were sitting having tea along the main street of the town. The young girl was so attentive to the older woman, carefully guiding her along. What touched me was the young helping the old

Leading the Blind, Bouake, Cote d’Ivoire

We were sitting having tea along the main street of the town. The young girl was so attentive to the older woman, carefully guiding her along. What touched me was the young helping the old

Quarry Workers, near Korhogo, Cote d’Ivoire   We saw this work carried out both in quarries and along the roadside. It is a monumental task, breaking large boulders into gravel-sized rocks using only hand tools. The job takes many hours in the extreme heat, often entire families, including children, can be seen hammering at the rocks.

Quarry Workers, near Korhogo, Cote d’Ivoire

We saw this work carried out both in quarries and along the roadside. It is a monumental task, breaking large boulders into gravel-sized rocks using only hand tools. The job takes many hours in the extreme heat, often entire families, including children, can be seen hammering at the rocks.

Sacred Boulder, near Korhogo, Cote d’Ivoire   A short walk in sweltering heat and sun took us to this fetish site. Despite being mainly Muslim, many people rely on their animist traditions to get answers to personal problems. Fetish priests conduct rituals and animal sacrifices of chickens, sheep, and goats at this large boulder. A patch of chicken feathers stuck to the rock with blood is clearly visible. Shortly before we arrived, the lamb had been sacrificed to divine the solution to a problem. The lamb was carved into pieces for cooking and eating by the family that night.

Sacred Boulder, near Korhogo, Cote d’Ivoire

A short walk in sweltering heat and sun took us to this fetish site. Despite being mainly Muslim, many people rely on their animist traditions to get answers to personal problems. Fetish priests conduct rituals and animal sacrifices of chickens, sheep, and goats at this large boulder. A patch of chicken feathers stuck to the rock with blood is clearly visible. Shortly before we arrived, the lamb had been sacrificed to divine the solution to a problem. The lamb was carved into pieces for cooking and eating by the family that night.

Postcards: Everyday Tourist Garden

While this year’s cold, rainy summer in Calgary hasn’t been great for humans the plants have loved it. I enjoy wandering the garden most morning and take a few photos as I love the morning light. I thought I’d share them with you.

Let me know which ones you like the best….

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Road Trip: Postcards From Alberta's Badlands & Ghost Towns

This summer we decided to explore some of the off-the-beaten path places in southern Alberta. Our first adventure was to Drumheller (where we haven’t been for decades) and to some of the small town “main streets” along the way, as well as the Badlands.  

This road trip strengthen our resolve to think outside the “city.”

Public Art?

Public Art?

More public art?

More public art?

HOPE….found this book sculpture at the Salvation Army in Drumheller.

HOPE….found this book sculpture at the Salvation Army in Drumheller.

Everybody loves a train ride!

Everybody loves a train ride!

First Stop: Irricana (population 1,216) 

Its name is a contraction of the words “irrigation canals” which are found in the area.  Settlement dates back to 1909 and it was incorporated as a village on June 9, 1911, by which time it had a post office, hotel and general store operated by the Irricana Trading Company.  Today, though the store’s building is still standing, is abandoned and much of the Main Street consists of vacant lots making it look like a ghost-town. While there are some attempts to add some colour and charm with murals, it seems a bit futile.  

However, just outside of town on the highway #9, sits a fun installation of farm equipment mounted high up on posts promoting, Pioneer Acres, where I am told you will find a dozen buildings filled with unique exhibits and artifacts from the early prairie pioneers.  Too bad those buildings weren’t located in the town along Main Street. 

Link:Pioneer Acres https://www.pioneeracres.ab.ca

The Irricana Hotel a reminder of the community’s once bustling Main Street. Today “Old Smoky” stands guard. The plaque says the horse was fabricated by Kevan Leycraft and donated by Melvin Brown to commemorate his residence in Irricana since 1952. He passed away in 1997.

The Irricana Hotel a reminder of the community’s once bustling Main Street. Today “Old Smoky” stands guard. The plaque says the horse was fabricated by Kevan Leycraft and donated by Melvin Brown to commemorate his residence in Irricana since 1952. He passed away in 1997.

Main Street Irricana.

Main Street Irricana.

One of several large paintings attached to the sides buildings in downtown Irricana to add some colour and charm. These were done by artists Leona Fraser in 2009.

One of several large paintings attached to the sides buildings in downtown Irricana to add some colour and charm. These were done by artists Leona Fraser in 2009.

Second Stop:  Beiseker (population 819) 

Lying in a belt of rich black soil, Beiseker was developed as an agricultural service centre. It was founded by the Calgary Colonization Company, whose purpose was to promote settlement by demonstrating the grain-growing potential of the area. The village is named after Thomas Beiseker, a partner and vice president of the company. The surrounding area became known as "World Wheat King Capital" because of its ability to grow wheat. Today, a  small park at the end of main street tells the history of the town. It even has a tiny sod house that you can explore. 

The village began to grow in 1910 when the branch line of the Canadian Pacific Railway was completed. The Grand Trunk Pacific line - now owned by Canadian National Railway - was constructed in 1912 to the east of the central business district

With the construction and intersection of Highways 9, 72 and 806 being at the northeast edge of the village, Beiseker came to have a very favourable location in terms of road and rail access. Almost equidistant from Calgary and Drumheller, Beiseker began to emerge as a local service and trade centre for the surrounding rural agricultural area. 

Beiseker currently serves as a centre for local agricultural services including fertilizer, seed cleaning, and soil testing. There is a local UFA outlet, and a Canadian Malting Co. grain elevator serving farmers in the area. Local industries serve the oil patch.  

It is also home to the Canadian office of Lampson International, a large international company specializing in construction cranes and a biomedical incinerator which handles medical waste from hospitals in Alberta, Canada and internationally.  

Not unlike Irricana, wandering Beisker’s main street on a Saturday morning was akin to walking in a ghost town -  nobody on the streets, lots of the main street buildings are gone and those that remain look like they are struggling to survive.

Old and new, train station becomes City offices.

Old and new, train station becomes City offices.

It is hard to imagine that people actually lived year round in these tiny homes. Put the new “Tiny Homes” trend into perspective.

It is hard to imagine that people actually lived year round in these tiny homes. Put the new “Tiny Homes” trend into perspective.

If you wander around the residential streets your will find these fun gnome fire hydrants. We have seen these before in small Alberta towns. Not sure if this is an Alberta thing, prairie thing or small towns everywhere. They sure are fun.

If you wander around the residential streets your will find these fun gnome fire hydrants. We have seen these before in small Alberta towns. Not sure if this is an Alberta thing, prairie thing or small towns everywhere. They sure are fun.

We decided to have a coffee and pastry at Arcada Cafe….great cinnamon buns…and we almost missed the fact they have a vintage arcade room in the back. A must see for anyone into old arcade games.

We decided to have a coffee and pastry at Arcada Cafe….great cinnamon buns…and we almost missed the fact they have a vintage arcade room in the back. A must see for anyone into old arcade games.

Love the graphics on the old games….

Love the graphics on the old games….

Love the fun factor…

Love the fun factor…

Third Stop: Horseshoe Canyon Park 

 While not the Grand Canyon, Horseshoe Canyon sits just off Hwy 9, 17 km west of Drumheller in the Canadian Badlands. It is an eye-popping sight. Stand at the edge of this huge U-shaped canyon and try to imagine what it was like when the dinosaurs roamed a lush sub-tropical habitat some 70 million years ago. Today, marked trails guide your wandering down into the canyon to get a closer look at the different soils, rock formations and plants. There are even helicopter rides available on-site.  The park is free and there is lots of free parking. 

Horseshoe Canyon

Horseshoe Canyon

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Fourth Stop: Drumheller (population 7,982)

When we first moved to Alberta in the early ‘80s, Drumheller was best known as the home of the Drumheller Institution (aka prison). Opened in 1967 as a medium security facility, a minimum security facility was added in 1997. Today, it has a capacity of 704 (582 medium security and 122 minimum security). The Institution provides a stable economic and employment base for Drumheller and surrounding area. 

In the late 1980s, Drumheller became famous as a center for dinosaur tourism and research with the opening of the Tyrell Museum in 1985 (it subsequently received “Royal” status in 1990.  Located 6 km northwest from Drumheller, the museum is situated in the middle of the fossil-bearing strata of the Late Cretaceous Horseshoe Canyon Formationand holds 130,000 fossil specimens from the Alberta badlands, Dinosaur Provincial Park and the Devil's Coulee Dinosaur Egg Site.  In the first year it attracted over 500,000 visitors from over 100 countries. Today, it averages about 350,000 visitors annually. 

We opted to skip the museum (a new exhibition had just opened and it was a zoo) to flaneur downtown Drumheller. To our pleasant surprise, the downtown has several charming shops, restaurants - even a Saturday farmers’ market.  What impressed us most is how the city has capitalized on the dinosaur theme with fun creatures at every downtown corner making for great photo ops. We encounter several families exploring the downtown taking photos of the kids with the dinosaurs.

Love these fun cartoonish characters waiting for you to sit beside them. Perhaps cities take their public art programs too seriously. People just want to have fun….perhaps big cities take their public art too seriously?

Love these fun cartoonish characters waiting for you to sit beside them. Perhaps cities take their public art programs too seriously. People just want to have fun….perhaps big cities take their public art too seriously?

Downtown Drumheller has an eclectic collection of shops to explore.

Downtown Drumheller has an eclectic collection of shops to explore.

Treasure hunters will enjoy Drumheller’s downtown art galleries and antique stores.

Treasure hunters will enjoy Drumheller’s downtown art galleries and antique stores.

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Couldn’t resist one more postcard of the fun benches. I preferred these to the World’s largest dinosaur (86 ft high and 151 feet long) that is located a few blocks from downtown.

Couldn’t resist one more postcard of the fun benches. I preferred these to the World’s largest dinosaur (86 ft high and 151 feet long) that is located a few blocks from downtown.

There are dinosaurs everywhere you look in Dumheller.

There are dinosaurs everywhere you look in Dumheller.

Drumheller has preserved a sense of past in its downtown.

Drumheller has preserved a sense of past in its downtown.

How clever? All of the streets have not only old names but new dinosaur names. How fun!

How clever? All of the streets have not only old names but new dinosaur names. How fun!

Just outside of Drumheller on the way to Wayne is Asterroid a must stop for those who like ice cream. No road trip is complete with out an ice cream cone.

Just outside of Drumheller on the way to Wayne is Asterroid a must stop for those who like ice cream. No road trip is complete with out an ice cream cone.

 Fifth Stop: Wayne (population 40)

Wayne, located 10 km southeast of Drumheller was once a thriving coal mining town whose population is estimated to have reached a high of 10,000 in 1932. The last mine closed in 1957 and today it is home to about 40 diehard souls. Half the fun of visiting Wayne is navigating a winding road with 11 (no word of a lie)  one-lane bridges along a moon-like landscape to get there. 

In its heyday, Wayne had a school, hospital, hotel, theatre and several stores along its main street.  Today, all that remains is the Rosedeer Hotel which surprisingly still operates as a hotel and its Last Chance Saloon, now a popular watering hole for touring motorcycle groups.  The hotel has only 6 rooms, each with a different theme – Titanic, Golf, Harley, Miners, Honeymoon and Music Room.  

The Saloon often has live music and hosts the annual WayneStock music festival (this year’s festival is from August 30 to Sept 2, 2019).  While we were there the Maybellines were playing the afternoon set – it was magical. 

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Sixth Stop: East Coulee (population 148) 

We “passed” on stopping at the Hoodoos Park just east of Drumheller and proceeded directly to East Coulee and the Atlas Coal mine (a national historic site) site 16 km east of Drumheller. Once home to about 3,000 residents, its heyday was between 1920s and 1950s when, like Wayne, the coal mines were excavating hundreds of thousands of tons of coal.  Today, the old school has been converted into a museum which also hosts an annual spring music festival “SpringFest.”  Unfortunately we arrived just after 5 pm too late to get into the museum. 

The streets of East Coulee are lined with huge trees, giving it an oasis-like feeling compared to the barren surrounding landscape. The tiny miners’ homes are a reminder of how early pioneers lived in modest small homes, each probably housed six or more people.

Nothing is left of its main street except one large building that has been converted into a studio for the manufacturing of dinosaur-related items for museums, movie studios, parades and theme parks.  There is also a small gift shop with a lovely garden.  

Just across the river from East Coulee is The Atlas Coal Mine National Historic Site that operated from 1936 to 1979. It is the most complete historic coal mine in Canada and is home to the country's last standing wooden coal tipple. In fact, it’s  the largest still standing in North America. Designated a Provincial Historic Resource in 1989, it achieved  National Historic Site of Canada status in 2002. 

Various guided tour options exist. You can take a train ride through the site, walk up the tipple or tour the 210 foot underground conveyor tunnel. The facilities are open to visitors from May to Thanksgiving weekend. 

With not enough time to do a tour (we arrived 20 minutes before closing) we instead walked up the dead end road west of the parking lot where we had heard there was an art installation.  Sure enough, at the end of the road, stood dozens of five foot tall tree limbs with alien head-like nobs stuck in the ground with rock piles at their base to help them stay standing. Many of the limbs had various small trinkets hanging or sitting on them, creating a somber, graveyard sense of place.  There is no markings or signs indicating who did them, why there are there, which only adds to the mystique. 

You can hardly see the homes for the trees and shrubs in East Coulee. It is like time has passed this community by.

You can hardly see the homes for the trees and shrubs in East Coulee. It is like time has passed this community by.

We were shocked to find a gift shop in East Coulee.

We were shocked to find a gift shop in East Coulee.

All aboard….

All aboard….

Railway bridge from Atlas Coal mine to East Coulee and beyond.

Railway bridge from Atlas Coal mine to East Coulee and beyond.

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Atlas Coal mine site

Atlas Coal mine site

There is lots of mine artifacts next to the parking lot with information panels.

There is lots of mine artifacts next to the parking lot with information panels.

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Loved this coal dust sand box….

Loved this coal dust sand box….

Public Art?

Public Art?

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Seventh Stop: Rosebud (population 87) 

It was founded in the 1885 by James Wishart, while following the Gleichen Trail with his family on their way to Montana. Arriving in the dark, they awoke the next  morning to discover the river valley covered by wild roses- Alberta’s official flower. Wishart then reportedly said, "Here's the promised land; we go no further." 

The beauty of the valley has attracted many people throughout the years, from nature lovers to artists. Notable Canadian artists A. Y. Jackson and H. G. Glyde, members of the Group of Seven, spent the summer of 1944 painting in the area. 

 Over the years, farming and coal mining have been the primary industries. In 1972, the Severn Creek School was shut down as part of an Alberta-wide education consolidating process, forcing local children to be bussed to Standard and Drumheller.  This resulted in the closure of  many local businesses and the hamlet population dropping to under a dozen people. 

But at Easter 1973, a group of young adults from Calgary brought about 40 teenagers out and camped in the then empty mercantile building. This pilot event initially evolved into a summer camp funded by a grant from the Alberta government and then later, Rosebud Camp of the Arts supported by Crescent Heights Baptist Church in Calgary. 

In 1977, a high school was founded using the old buildings of the town as classrooms and emphasizing practical visual, music and the performing arts in its curriculum. In the 1980s, Rosebud School of the Arts began to operate theatre, which eventually developed into Rosebud Theatre and the school shifted its emphasis to post-secondary education. 

Today, Rosebud Theatre runs as a fully professional company that offers programming year round and is a tourist attraction drawing patrons largely from Calgary and Drumheller.  It has a few shops, an art gallery and an excellent museum along its two main streets.  There were probably a dozen people wandering the streets while we were there. There are even an inn and bed & breakfast accommodations for those not wanting to drive home after the theatre. 

While tourism might save Rosebud, it can’t save every small town and village in Alberta. 

Link: Rosebud Theatre 

Link: The Hamlet of Rosebud 

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The old hotel is now the offices for the Rosebud Theatre.

The old hotel is now the offices for the Rosebud Theatre.

The Rosebud Museum/Library has an extensive collection of early 20th century artifacts documenting the life of the early prairie settlers. Admission is FREE.

The Rosebud Museum/Library has an extensive collection of early 20th century artifacts documenting the life of the early prairie settlers. Admission is FREE.

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In the Library…the tag reads “Tailored by Suzanne est. 1952. Dress donated by Minnie Neufeld (Ziegler). Worn during the time Minnie waitressed for the Carolina a well-known restaurant in downtown Calgary. Off duty standards for dress and behaviour were very strict. No gum chewing, spitting or swearing in public.

In the Library…the tag reads “Tailored by Suzanne est. 1952. Dress donated by Minnie Neufeld (Ziegler). Worn during the time Minnie waitressed for the Carolina a well-known restaurant in downtown Calgary. Off duty standards for dress and behaviour were very strict. No gum chewing, spitting or swearing in public.

While wandering the streets we found this house with an elaborate model railway in the front yard. The house next door was in the process of being remodelled to sell model railway pieces.

While wandering the streets we found this house with an elaborate model railway in the front yard. The house next door was in the process of being remodelled to sell model railway pieces.

Lesson Learned

On our way home, we chatted about how this road trip was a good reminder of how Alberta and the prairies have evolved over thousands of years from roaming dinosaurs, to nomadic indigenous people, to agricultural and resource pioneers (first coal, then oil and gas), to today’s corporate farming and resource development.  

It is good for us city folks to get out and explore the real towns and villages (not just the tourist attractions and tourist towns - aka Banff and Canmore) to get a better perspective of the world we share.  While much of the media attention these days is about the urbanization of Canada and decline of rural living, there are still a significant number of people living in rural Alberta communities - 656,048 according to 2016 Census of Canada.

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Everyday Life In Africa: Republic of Sierra Leone

We had a lot of surprises while traveling the countries on the west coast of Africa, and the vast majority were good surprises. Sierra Leone was a very nice surprise.

What I knew of Sierra Leone was mainly what I remembered from news reports of their civil war that was fought between three separate groups from 1991 to 2002.

The term ‘child soldier’ was coined as a result of the forced conscription of children as young as 8 years old into the military forces. The use of children in fighting was mainly by the RUF rebel group, but other groups were also guilty of using children.

Daniel’s Courtyard Neighbor, Makeni, Sierra Leone

Daniel’s Courtyard Neighbor, Makeni, Sierra Leone

Gold & Diamonds?

Sierra Leone has rebounded considerably since the end of the civil war, partly due to the resources of gold and diamonds. Unfortunate, the revenues from these two valuable resources leads to corruption where most of the profits generated from sales end up being grabbed by the ruling elite and their close business partners. 

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China has also played a major role in the economic rebound. The Chinese have built a good highway system, shipping ports, railroads and developed a huge iron ore mine. The normal way China finances these developments is to loan the money to the government and then take mineral resources as payment on the loans.

As we drove through the country, we saw numerous agricultural developments with Chinese names; probably also financed with the crops being used for payment.

The Ebola epidemic that ravaged parts of Africa from 2014 to 2016 infected over 28,000 people and resulted in 11,325 deaths in Sierra Leone alone. While riding in a taxi in Freetown, the capital of Sierra Leone, the driver commented on a garbage dump that we were passing and called it ‘Ebola Central.’ Fortunately, the epidemic had been declared over before our trip.

In general, we were warmly welcomed and treated with great hospitality during our time in Sierra Leone. We were never treated badly or had any large amount of overt hostility directed at us in any of the countries we traveled through in Africa. In some cases, we were the subject of curiosity as most of these countries do not have any widespread tourism.

Anne Tapler White: Red Earth in Black & White

My “Red Earth in Black and White” project documents the everyday lives of the people of West Africa from Dakar, Senegal and carrying me down the west coast of Africa to Cape Town, South Africa. I have learned from my travels that we are all bound by common threads, joined together across distant lands. The photographs tell a story, becoming a frozen narrative capturing a fleeting moment. 

“My name is Daniel Conteh” is one such story. It begins in Makeni, Sierra Leone, late afternoon monsoon rains forced me to take shelter on a porch, where a family had set up a table selling soft drinks, beer and candy.

After purchasing something to drink I settled down on a bench for the rains to subside. But the rains were relentless and soon a boy named Daniel asked me to come off the porch into his home. The living area was crowded with people and I was introduced to Daniel’s mother, Grandmother, Aunt and siblings. A hall joined to an outer courtyard where neighbors sheltered from the rain. I was given permission to photograph the family and their neighbors. Daniel’s Grandmother told of her hip operation and lifted her dress to show the scar.

That chance encounter has left an indelible impression with me, especially that little boy who invited me into his home and who did not want his photo taken. But on the wall above his mother you will see that he had previously written “My name is Daniel Conteh” now for all the world to see.

Daniel’s Mother, Makeni, Sierra Leone

Daniel’s Mother, Makeni, Sierra Leone

Daniel’s Grandmother, Makeni, Sierra Leone

Daniel’s Grandmother, Makeni, Sierra Leone

Neighbors Sheltering from the Rain, Makeni, Sierra Leone

Neighbors Sheltering from the Rain, Makeni, Sierra Leone

Daniel’s Family, Makeni, Sierra Leone

Daniel’s Family, Makeni, Sierra Leone

Bob White’s Photos From Sierra Leone

We stopped along the road one day for a break on the edge of a village just as the local school was finishing for the day. We were quickly surrounded by about 100 curious students. They crowded around and some of our group who spoke French were able to converse and answer their questions. Nearly all the girls had intricately braided hair, and they were more than willing to pose for our pictures.

We stopped along the road one day for a break on the edge of a village just as the local school was finishing for the day. We were quickly surrounded by about 100 curious students. They crowded around and some of our group who spoke French were able to converse and answer their questions. Nearly all the girls had intricately braided hair, and they were more than willing to pose for our pictures.

Due to a mechanical breakdown on our truck, we spent nearly an entire day in the tiny village of Kambama. The people seem very accepting of us wandering around the village and taking pictures of their houses, school, and their activities. Most of the village is Christian and their children attend the small village school. These two boys were part of the Muslim minority and they receive instruction from an Imam who visits the village 1 or 2 days each week. They were proud to display their homework neatly written in Arabic.

Due to a mechanical breakdown on our truck, we spent nearly an entire day in the tiny village of Kambama. The people seem very accepting of us wandering around the village and taking pictures of their houses, school, and their activities. Most of the village is Christian and their children attend the small village school. These two boys were part of the Muslim minority and they receive instruction from an Imam who visits the village 1 or 2 days each week. They were proud to display their homework neatly written in Arabic.

This small church was built by freed slaves who returned to Sierra Leone. We were told the returned slaves were not well received by the local population and it took many years for them to successfully reintegrate into the local society.

This small church was built by freed slaves who returned to Sierra Leone. We were told the returned slaves were not well received by the local population and it took many years for them to successfully reintegrate into the local society.

One afternoon we were surprised to see a funeral party and pallbearers trooping down the beach to a small village that had no road access. At least two streams had to be forded by the group, that prevented many of the guests from getting to the village to attend the burial.

One afternoon we were surprised to see a funeral party and pallbearers trooping down the beach to a small village that had no road access. At least two streams had to be forded by the group, that prevented many of the guests from getting to the village to attend the burial.

Bure beach at sunset. Bure beach is a common destination for weekends and holidays for people living in nearby Freetown. There are a number of small hotels and scattered individual cottages along this stretch of fine sandy beach. We stayed at the pompously name Bure Beach Resort, it was not in the resort category by any standards. The corrugated iron roof over the lobby and dining area leaked so badly it was nearly as wet inside as in the afternoon downpour outside. The rooms were small and barren and the curtains on the windows had rotted to shreds. On the plus side, the plumbing mainly worked, the staff was amazingly accommodating and the meals were surprisingly good.

Bure beach at sunset. Bure beach is a common destination for weekends and holidays for people living in nearby Freetown. There are a number of small hotels and scattered individual cottages along this stretch of fine sandy beach. We stayed at the pompously name Bure Beach Resort, it was not in the resort category by any standards. The corrugated iron roof over the lobby and dining area leaked so badly it was nearly as wet inside as in the afternoon downpour outside. The rooms were small and barren and the curtains on the windows had rotted to shreds. On the plus side, the plumbing mainly worked, the staff was amazingly accommodating and the meals were surprisingly good.

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AnneTaplerWhite Photography

Everyday Live in Africa: Senegal

Everyday Life in Africa : Senegal

This past winter I received hundreds of photos and detailed emails from Bob White (no relation) as he and his wife Anne explored remote villages in Africa for three months. The emails were fascinating as Bob shared with family and friends the trials and tribulations of travelling the back roads to get to “off the beaten path” places where they observe and capture the everyday life of Africans.

When they got back I asked if they would be interested in sharing some of their photos and experiences with Everyday Tourist blog readers as I know many of us have never been to Africa and if we have it probably wasn’t to the villages that they travelled to.

I am pleased they have agreed to share their experiences and insights with the Everyday Tourist community.

Arithmetic on the Wall, St Louis, 2016   This image caught my eye because the children were concentrating on doing their lesson so intently my presence went undetected. I surmised that the lack of paper and pencils made the building the next best thing to write on.

Arithmetic on the Wall, St Louis, 2016

This image caught my eye because the children were concentrating on doing their lesson so intently my presence went undetected. I surmised that the lack of paper and pencils made the building the next best thing to write on.

Anne Tapler White: Red Earth in Black & White Project

My Africa project, entitled “Red Earth in Black & White, began in 2013. I am interested in documenting the everyday life of the African people, and to some extent, portrays similarities to our own lives, all bound by common threads. The images tell a story that at times goes beyond the scope of written words, becoming a frozen narrative capturing a fleeting moment and perhaps in the eyes of the viewer creating a private story.

The Red Earth not only describes the iron-rich soil but is a symbol of its people and their visceral bond with the land that sustains them. It is in the vastness of the never-ending landscape with its small villages and in the streets of the more urban centers that you see their struggles, resilience, and their pride in being African.

Clean Sweep, Cape Skirring, 2016   It was the start of the tourist season and the women of the community all joined together to sweep the streets in preparation for the onslaught of tourists. True community spirit, with an abundance of brooms.

Clean Sweep, Cape Skirring, 2016

It was the start of the tourist season and the women of the community all joined together to sweep the streets in preparation for the onslaught of tourists. True community spirit, with an abundance of brooms.

Good Bye Look, Sippo Island, 2016   We spent several hours in a classroom that was taught by one teacher. The grades ran from Kindergarten to junior high. The children displayed the most amazing penmanship. The young girls gaze from the window was irresistible.

Good Bye Look, Sippo Island, 2016

We spent several hours in a classroom that was taught by one teacher. The grades ran from Kindergarten to junior high. The children displayed the most amazing penmanship. The young girls gaze from the window was irresistible.

Village Bakery, N’ Doul, 2016   The bakery was housed in a small industrial building, there were no counters and the bread was dispensed from boxes. The children who were working there ranged in age from maybe eight to twelve. Child labor is a continuing problem and one that I witnessed too often in my travels.

Village Bakery, N’ Doul, 2016

The bakery was housed in a small industrial building, there were no counters and the bread was dispensed from boxes. The children who were working there ranged in age from maybe eight to twelve. Child labor is a continuing problem and one that I witnessed too often in my travels.

Everyday Culture

“We got hooked on Africa partly because so few other tourists go there, we like to be off the beaten path, going to places and seeing things that haven’t been overdone and over-run. We are more interested in the people living their everyday lives and the culture of the countries” noted Bob White.

The rich musical history of Africa, especially from Ghana, Cote d’ Ivoire, Mali, and Senegal, is also fascinating. Virtually everywhere we traveled in West Africa we saw almost no other Caucasians and extremely few tourists, with the exception of South Africa.  

The sights we have seen are much lower key than the pyramids and other ancient sights in Egypt. The sights in West Africa may not have the awe factor of the popular tourist attractions, but we often find more personal connections to what we see.

Senegal is more Westernized than many other places in West Africa. Cape Skirring and a handful of other spots along the Atlantic coast regularly attract tourists from Europe, primarily from France due to Senegal being a former French colony. St. Louis in northern Senegal was of particular interest due to its history of being a regular stop on the original airmail route bringing mail from the US to Europe through South America and Africa.

As far as our photography shooting styles, Anne is much more deliberate in choosing her shots; I tend to take lots of pictures of everything I see and hope I get a scattering of good pictures. Anne has the eye to pick out the less obvious compositions and likes to include people in most of her photos.

Note: Bob always takes colour photos while Anne takes black and white.

When we visited Sippo Island, we had to provide a large bag of rice as an entrance fee to wander around the island and take photos. In the photo, the rice is being divided to share with all of the local families. It was nice to see that the rice didn’t go only to the village chief and his family.

When we visited Sippo Island, we had to provide a large bag of rice as an entrance fee to wander around the island and take photos. In the photo, the rice is being divided to share with all of the local families. It was nice to see that the rice didn’t go only to the village chief and his family.

We were in Senegal at the height of the harvest season for many fruits and melons. It was common to see piles of watermelons along the roads and stacked on sidewalks, like the ones in the photo. Many of these fruit stands seemed to be unattended, I assume that buyers would select a melon and then pay the grower directly.

We were in Senegal at the height of the harvest season for many fruits and melons. It was common to see piles of watermelons along the roads and stacked on sidewalks, like the ones in the photo. Many of these fruit stands seemed to be unattended, I assume that buyers would select a melon and then pay the grower directly.

A group of colorful fishing boats in the harbor at St. Louis, Senegal. St. Louis is a major port for Senegal and a large portion of the people earn their living from the sea. Much of the fishing is done at night and the boats return in the morning to sell their catch.

A group of colorful fishing boats in the harbor at St. Louis, Senegal. St. Louis is a major port for Senegal and a large portion of the people earn their living from the sea. Much of the fishing is done at night and the boats return in the morning to sell their catch.

The fishing beach, St. Louis, Senegal. Hundreds of dilapidated houses, little more than shacks, crowd the edge of the beach in St. Louis, often with fishing boats tucked between them well above the tide. The children mainly play on the beach as there is virtually no other open space in the fishing village. Adults seem to commonly use the beach as a sidewalk to visit friends and neighbors. We were tolerated, but not really welcome on this garbage-strewn beach. We had hoped to see the boats coming in and unloading their catch, but our timing was off.

The fishing beach, St. Louis, Senegal. Hundreds of dilapidated houses, little more than shacks, crowd the edge of the beach in St. Louis, often with fishing boats tucked between them well above the tide. The children mainly play on the beach as there is virtually no other open space in the fishing village. Adults seem to commonly use the beach as a sidewalk to visit friends and neighbors. We were tolerated, but not really welcome on this garbage-strewn beach. We had hoped to see the boats coming in and unloading their catch, but our timing was off.

Last Word

Africa became a project for me. It appealed to my preference for shooting in busy chaotic situations. The markets and streets display endless photographic possibilities. My interest is more social documentary in nature, presenting a more candid view of the people and their cultures in everyday life situations.  

I prefer the black and white image as opposed to color, because it draws out the essence of a moment, and simplifies the image. It is hard to explain why I take certain images. For me, it's very immediate when some or all of the photographic elements come together. 

For more photos checkout Anne’s website: Anne Tapler White

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