Southern Alberta Road Trip: Folk Art & Architecture Postcards 

Recently we decided to take a three day road trip south from Calgary to Lethbridge, over to Waterton National Park and then home.  Along the way we dropped into numerous small towns and villages like Carseland, Vulcan, Carmongay, Barons, Nobleford, Picture Butte, Magrath, Cardston, Pincher Creek and Longview to check out their main streets, side streets and back alleys to see what fun surprises there might be.

We weren’t disappointed. We found some mega birdhouses, quirky, quasi public art, historic churches, artifacts and architecture and funky street signs. We began to call it the folk art and architecture tour.

Here are some postcards from our tour….   

Was surprise to find this fish monument celebrating the 100th anniversary of the founding of the town Carseland (population 525) which is near, but not next to the Bow River.

Was surprise to find this fish monument celebrating the 100th anniversary of the founding of the town Carseland (population 525) which is near, but not next to the Bow River.

Loved this quirky homemade birdhouse that combines traffic lights with railway cars. The entire front yard was like a folk art gallery.

Loved this quirky homemade birdhouse that combines traffic lights with railway cars. The entire front yard was like a folk art gallery.

The architecture of the Carseland School reminded me of the old wooden grain sheds that dot the prairies.

The architecture of the Carseland School reminded me of the old wooden grain sheds that dot the prairies.

Aspen Crossing at Mossleigh is a real hidden gem. The Aspen Crossing Railway is a heritage railway in Southern Alberta, southeast of Calgary. In 2002 the last CP train ran through Mossleigh, however, after 6 years of negotiations Jason Thornhill, the creator of Aspen Crossing, was successful in securing the rights to 14 miles of rail line. Today, you can enjoy Champagne Brunch, Dinner Theatre, High Tea or Aies on Rails while riding a vintage train. They even have a Circus Train. More info:  https://www.aspencrossing.com/railway

Aspen Crossing at Mossleigh is a real hidden gem. The Aspen Crossing Railway is a heritage railway in Southern Alberta, southeast of Calgary. In 2002 the last CP train ran through Mossleigh, however, after 6 years of negotiations Jason Thornhill, the creator of Aspen Crossing, was successful in securing the rights to 14 miles of rail line. Today, you can enjoy Champagne Brunch, Dinner Theatre, High Tea or Aies on Rails while riding a vintage train. They even have a Circus Train. More info: https://www.aspencrossing.com/railway

We enjoyed just wandering the grounds that includes several vintage railway cars, gift shop and greenhouse.

We enjoyed just wandering the grounds that includes several vintage railway cars, gift shop and greenhouse.

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The highlight of the Aspen Crossing visit was having a coffee in the Diefenbaker Dinaing Car. It was purchased from Chicago to become Prime Minister John Diefenbaker’s “whistle-stop” rail car from 1958 to mid-1960. After 1962, John George Diefenbaker used the Pullman car as his private business car. Rumour has it, it once belonged to an “infamous gangster club.”

The highlight of the Aspen Crossing visit was having a coffee in the Diefenbaker Dinaing Car. It was purchased from Chicago to become Prime Minister John Diefenbaker’s “whistle-stop” rail car from 1958 to mid-1960. After 1962, John George Diefenbaker used the Pullman car as his private business car. Rumour has it, it once belonged to an “infamous gangster club.”

Next Stop Vulcan (population 1,917), where the entire town has embraced the Star Trek theme as a means of attracting tourists and adding some fun to living there.

Next Stop Vulcan (population 1,917), where the entire town has embraced the Star Trek theme as a means of attracting tourists and adding some fun to living there.

Even some of the lampposts have a Star Trek connection.

Even some of the lampposts have a Star Trek connection.

At first I thought this was public art as it looks like a series of grain elevators. But I quickly learned it is a Solar Park that is both fun and educational with its didactic panels. Love the linking of science, art and a park.

At first I thought this was public art as it looks like a series of grain elevators. But I quickly learned it is a Solar Park that is both fun and educational with its didactic panels. Love the linking of science, art and a park.

The park has several colourful light boxes.

The park has several colourful light boxes.

Found these all over town…this one was at the entrance to the Library. How fun!

Found these all over town…this one was at the entrance to the Library. How fun!

Many of the shop windows make some reference to Star Trek.

Many of the shop windows make some reference to Star Trek.

Even the crosswalks have a Star Trek link.

Even the crosswalks have a Star Trek link.

If you explore Vulcan a bit more you will find bizarre buildings like this one.

If you explore Vulcan a bit more you will find bizarre buildings like this one.

This is Vulcan’s Visitor Information Centre which includes a small Star Trek museum.

This is Vulcan’s Visitor Information Centre which includes a small Star Trek museum.

Driving by on the highway you see the model of the Starship Enterprise and a huge fun solar flower both foreshadowing what there is to see if you stop and explore the town.

Driving by on the highway you see the model of the Starship Enterprise and a huge fun solar flower both foreshadowing what there is to see if you stop and explore the town.

Next stop Carmangay (population 242), which is known for its fire tower. Link:  Village History

Next stop Carmangay (population 242), which is known for its fire tower. Link: Village History

At the entrance to Carmangay is a wind turbine blade lying on the ground that allows you to appreciate just how large they are. Also makes for a great piece of public art with its distinctive shape and soft flowing lines. A nice surprise.

At the entrance to Carmangay is a wind turbine blade lying on the ground that allows you to appreciate just how large they are. Also makes for a great piece of public art with its distinctive shape and soft flowing lines. A nice surprise.

We were surprise to find this well preserved church on a side street, it was a reminder of the importance of churches in establishing communities across the prairies a 100 years ago.

We were surprise to find this well preserved church on a side street, it was a reminder of the importance of churches in establishing communities across the prairies a 100 years ago.

I expect this was a garage, today it would make a great artist’s studio. We found several corner buildings with similar rounded form like this on our adventure.

I expect this was a garage, today it would make a great artist’s studio. We found several corner buildings with similar rounded form like this on our adventure.

Next stop Champion (population 317) where we found this enchanting birdhouse on one the side streets.

Next stop Champion (population 317) where we found this enchanting birdhouse on one the side streets.

Next stop Barons (population 341), which once had a lovely tree line boulevard for its main street. Today looks very much like a ghost town. It is the northern tip of what is know as the Palliser Triangle. It is perhaps most famous as being a filming location for a scene in the 1978 Superman film.

Next stop Barons (population 341), which once had a lovely tree line boulevard for its main street. Today looks very much like a ghost town. It is the northern tip of what is know as the Palliser Triangle. It is perhaps most famous as being a filming location for a scene in the 1978 Superman film.

Nature is slowly taking over this old motel on Main Street.

Nature is slowly taking over this old motel on Main Street.

Someone has tried to brighten up this building and main street with a mural, but it has seen better days.

Someone has tried to brighten up this building and main street with a mural, but it has seen better days.

The quilt-like mural is composed of blocks each with a name of a local family.

The quilt-like mural is composed of blocks each with a name of a local family.

Loved these hand cut steel street signs.

Loved these hand cut steel street signs.

This one made me think of my Mom who calls herself “The Queen of the Rails.”

This one made me think of my Mom who calls herself “The Queen of the Rails.”

Next stop Nobleford population 1,280 where we found this charming wooden train in a backyard. Nobleford has realized an amazing revitalization since 2005 with a population increase of 50%, a 300% increase in employment and possibly the lowest municipal taxes in Canada.

Next stop Nobleford population 1,280 where we found this charming wooden train in a backyard. Nobleford has realized an amazing revitalization since 2005 with a population increase of 50%, a 300% increase in employment and possibly the lowest municipal taxes in Canada.

Not sure if this is suppose to be folk art or some contemporary art installation about how we clutter our lives with things.

Not sure if this is suppose to be folk art or some contemporary art installation about how we clutter our lives with things.

This old ice cream parlour with its board walk in Picture Butte (population 1,810) caught our attention, but unfortunately it is closed.

This old ice cream parlour with its board walk in Picture Butte (population 1,810) caught our attention, but unfortunately it is closed.

However, we did find this folk art gate. We haven’t seen one like this before.

However, we did find this folk art gate. We haven’t seen one like this before.

After an over night stay in Lethbridge our next stop was Magrath (population 2,374) where we were greeted by its unique skyline.

After an over night stay in Lethbridge our next stop was Magrath (population 2,374) where we were greeted by its unique skyline.

Love how this modern grain elevator has a miniature historic grain elevator on the top, but with a rounded roof rather than a pointed pitched roof.

Love how this modern grain elevator has a miniature historic grain elevator on the top, but with a rounded roof rather than a pointed pitched roof.

I have never seen a Civic Ave in any town or city before.

I have never seen a Civic Ave in any town or city before.

What is it about small towns and fun fire hydrants. Some might see then a kitschy but I love them.

What is it about small towns and fun fire hydrants. Some might see then a kitschy but I love them.

Some might also see this mural as kitschy but I found it intriguing.

Some might also see this mural as kitschy but I found it intriguing.

Next stop Cardston population 3,585. This log house was built by Charles Ora Card who in the autumn of 1887 led the first group of Mormons from Utah to Canada. It was one of the first buildings in the new Cardston townsite and remained for many years the centre of Cardston’s development.

Next stop Cardston population 3,585. This log house was built by Charles Ora Card who in the autumn of 1887 led the first group of Mormons from Utah to Canada. It was one of the first buildings in the new Cardston townsite and remained for many years the centre of Cardston’s development.

Loved the oversized arches of the School Division building.

Loved the oversized arches of the School Division building.

Guess a coat of paint made this building the New Block.

Guess a coat of paint made this building the New Block.

Cardston’s lovely historic Main Street was deserted on Saturday morning as everyone was at church.

Cardston’s lovely historic Main Street was deserted on Saturday morning as everyone was at church.

The Art Deco theatre was the architectural highlight of the street.

The Art Deco theatre was the architectural highlight of the street.

This old hotel dominated Cardston’s Main Street like a ghost of past prosperity.

This old hotel dominated Cardston’s Main Street like a ghost of past prosperity.

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What a great name for a cafe….

What a great name for a cafe….

Not sure if I like the paint job or not, but love the rounded corner.

Not sure if I like the paint job or not, but love the rounded corner.

As the Executive Director of the Calgary Downtown Association I ignited one of the first “Say No To Panhandlers” campaigns in Canada. You don’t hear much about panhandling problems anymore are there fewer or have we just accepted them.

As the Executive Director of the Calgary Downtown Association I ignited one of the first “Say No To Panhandlers” campaigns in Canada. You don’t hear much about panhandling problems anymore are there fewer or have we just accepted them.

On Main Street was a charming Mormon bookstore. It was an very interesting place to explore as it had a very different vibe with everyone dressed up as they were going or coming from church. It also had some unique books like this one.

On Main Street was a charming Mormon bookstore. It was an very interesting place to explore as it had a very different vibe with everyone dressed up as they were going or coming from church. It also had some unique books like this one.

Perfect bench!

Perfect bench!

The clouds in the background created a surreal sense of place for the temple entrance.

The clouds in the background created a surreal sense of place for the temple entrance.

Sandstone buildings always have charm and warmth that makes them timeless.

Sandstone buildings always have charm and warmth that makes them timeless.

Next stop Waterton (population 104) and the majestic Prince of Wales hotel.

Next stop Waterton (population 104) and the majestic Prince of Wales hotel.

I think it would make a great birdhouse!

I think it would make a great birdhouse!

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Yes the hotel still uses room keys.

Yes the hotel still uses room keys.

Was surprised to find this 20th century artifact in downtown Waterton.

Was surprised to find this 20th century artifact in downtown Waterton.

One of the many charming cottages in Waterton.

One of the many charming cottages in Waterton.

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Love how the roof of the church mirrors the mountain behind. By design or chance?

Love how the roof of the church mirrors the mountain behind. By design or chance?

Classic mid century garage today not only serves the needs of vehicles, but also rents bikes and kayaks, as well as being a convenience store.

Classic mid century garage today not only serves the needs of vehicles, but also rents bikes and kayaks, as well as being a convenience store.

One of the reason for out trip was to experience the live music at the Twin Butte General Store that was recently written up as one of Alberta’s best honky-tonks.  Link: Searching for Calgary’s true country heart  We had front row seats, but I wouldn’t call it a real honky-tonk as it is more a restaurant than a live music venue - I’d take Calgary’s Blues Can any day. But if you are in the area it is a must stop as it is a quirky general store.

One of the reason for out trip was to experience the live music at the Twin Butte General Store that was recently written up as one of Alberta’s best honky-tonks. Link: Searching for Calgary’s true country heart We had front row seats, but I wouldn’t call it a real honky-tonk as it is more a restaurant than a live music venue - I’d take Calgary’s Blues Can any day. But if you are in the area it is a must stop as it is a quirky general store.

Twin Butte population 10.

Twin Butte population 10.

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Next stop Pincher Creek population 3,642 with its pleasant Main Street.

Next stop Pincher Creek population 3,642 with its pleasant Main Street.

This strange sculpture marks the entrance to downtown. The plaque gives no information on the artist or its significance. Turns out it is an enlarged pincer that would be used for trimming the feet of horses. Turns out in 1868 when a group of prospectors lost a pincer in the small creek at this location and in 1876 the North-West Mounted Police discovered the rusting tool in the creek and named the area Pincher Creek.

This strange sculpture marks the entrance to downtown. The plaque gives no information on the artist or its significance. Turns out it is an enlarged pincer that would be used for trimming the feet of horses. Turns out in 1868 when a group of prospectors lost a pincer in the small creek at this location and in 1876 the North-West Mounted Police discovered the rusting tool in the creek and named the area Pincher Creek.

it has the typical historic murals, as well as some surprises.

it has the typical historic murals, as well as some surprises.

Who let this cow out of the pasture? Is this one of Calgary’s “Udderly Art” cows? The cow is on the balcony of the historic King Edward Hotel.

Who let this cow out of the pasture? Is this one of Calgary’s “Udderly Art” cows? The cow is on the balcony of the historic King Edward Hotel.

Quilt shop window…

Quilt shop window…

Pincher Creek’s Kootenai Brown Pioneer Village is definitely worth a visit. They had an amazing quilt show when we were there.

Pincher Creek’s Kootenai Brown Pioneer Village is definitely worth a visit. They had an amazing quilt show when we were there.

There is lots of fun local history artifacts.

There is lots of fun local history artifacts.

The Museum also includes a village that is very much like Calgary’s Heritage Park but on a smaller scale.

The Museum also includes a village that is very much like Calgary’s Heritage Park but on a smaller scale.

I am a sucker for minimalist architecture.

I am a sucker for minimalist architecture.

I am also a sucker for brick and rounded corners.

I am also a sucker for brick and rounded corners.

Next stop Longview population 307 and a popular watering hole along Highway #22. The towns Main Street has two iconic hotels - Twin Cities Hotel and Blue Sky Motel. It has also become a bit of an artists colony with several art galleries and cafes.

Next stop Longview population 307 and a popular watering hole along Highway #22. The towns Main Street has two iconic hotels - Twin Cities Hotel and Blue Sky Motel. It has also become a bit of an artists colony with several art galleries and cafes.

Blue Sky Motel.

Blue Sky Motel.

We were surprise to find The Film Experience Camera Store with its huge collection of film cameras and accessories. It literally has hundreds, maybe over a thousand vintage film cameras, lenses and accessories. It is rumoured to be the largest film camera store in Canada. Owner David Marshall is very friendly and knowledgeable. Next door is the Prairie Light Gallery that feature his photography ,as well as others.

We were surprise to find The Film Experience Camera Store with its huge collection of film cameras and accessories. It literally has hundreds, maybe over a thousand vintage film cameras, lenses and accessories. It is rumoured to be the largest film camera store in Canada. Owner David Marshall is very friendly and knowledgeable. Next door is the Prairie Light Gallery that feature his photography ,as well as others.

A blast from the past….

A blast from the past….

Our adventure ended as it began with a front yard full of pieces of folk art.

Our adventure ended as it began with a front yard full of pieces of folk art.

Salisbury House: Restaurant & Museum!

Though Salisbury House restaurants have been a Winnipeg icon for over 85 years, I somehow had never eaten there until a recent visit, despite having lived in Winnipeg for 14 months and visiting regularly since the early 80s. However while researching “best keep secrets” in Winnipeg for a recent visit,  I found out their Portage and Pembina restaurants have mini-museums in their lobbies.  

This was the catalyst I needed!

The iconic red roof of Salisbury House.

The iconic red roof of Salisbury House.

Salisbury House has always been very community oriented participating in community events like parades.

Salisbury House has always been very community oriented participating in community events like parades.

Sports & Music Museums

The Portage Avenue restaurant has several display cases with sports artifacts including hockey, football, baseball, curling and basketball.  While the Pembina Highway restaurant is a mini music hall of fame that even includes Burton Cummings piano.  Don’t believe me?

Here are the photos to prove it. 

The walls of every Salisbury House are full of photos that document the evolution of the restaurant over the past 85+ years.

The walls of every Salisbury House are full of photos that document the evolution of the restaurant over the past 85+ years.

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 Keep reading and you will find out….

What is a nip?

Who is Alex English?

The history of Rockola?

What is Zingo?

What Winnipeg band had golden records with the titles - Furnance Room, Silent Radar and Slomotion?

Who were the Winnipeg Whips?

Who is “Big Daddy?”

Like all good restaurants Salisbury House has a signature dessert. Read on for more details and fun story about their signature dessert.

Like all good restaurants Salisbury House has a signature dessert. Read on for more details and fun story about their signature dessert.

Salisbury House Sports Museum

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Salisbury House Manitoba Music Museum

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How many of these musicians can you name?

How many of these musicians can you name?

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This piano was give to Burton Cummings by Richard Moir. While located at Burton’s residence on Landsdowne Avenue Burton composed and played many tunes. some with his buddy, Gary “Big Daddy” MacLean of MacLean & MacLean, a popular Canadian Juno nominated musical-comedy duo.  It was purchased by Earl & Cheryl Barish at a live auction at the Winnipeg Convention Centre on Friday, July 27, 2001 during a benefit evening for Gary MacLean.

This piano was give to Burton Cummings by Richard Moir. While located at Burton’s residence on Landsdowne Avenue Burton composed and played many tunes. some with his buddy, Gary “Big Daddy” MacLean of MacLean & MacLean, a popular Canadian Juno nominated musical-comedy duo.

It was purchased by Earl & Cheryl Barish at a live auction at the Winnipeg Convention Centre on Friday, July 27, 2001 during a benefit evening for Gary MacLean.

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Donuts & Service

In addition to the lobby displays, the walls of every Salisbury House are plastered with fun historic photos of Salisbury House’s history, making them all a fun walk back in time. Link Salisbury House History https://www.salisburyhouse.ca/history

While nobody would confuse Salisbury House with fine dining, the food is good, prices great and the service outstanding.  When we asked for salad instead of french fries our waitress immediately said “Yes we can!!” No snooty look. No saying there will be a surcharge for the substitution. She was genuinely please to do it. 

And when we asked about the Tyler’s Hand Dipped Chocolate Iced Donut Sundae menu item and then later realizing we were full and would have to come back another time for dessert, she brought us a smaller version to share – no charge!  

That’s customer service. 

Salisbury House doesn’t just pay lip service to customer service, like so many restaurants.

Salisbury House doesn’t just pay lip service to customer service, like so many restaurants.

Indeed, the world has changed dramatically over the past 85+ years. Imagine have a cigar stand like this one in the Bus Depot at Hargrave and Graham.

Indeed, the world has changed dramatically over the past 85+ years. Imagine have a cigar stand like this one in the Bus Depot at Hargrave and Graham.

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In the days before iPads, family road trips involved playing games like Zingo!

In the days before iPads, family road trips involved playing games like Zingo!

Last Word

So, if you ever find yourself in Winnipeg and want a truly Winnipeg experience, definitely eat at Salisbury House preferably the one at 3315 Portage Avenue or 759 Pembina Highway. There are currently 9 fully service family restaurants, six of which are open 24 hours and five Sals Xpress restaurants.  

And make sure you leave room for dessert. 

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Winnipeg vs Calgary: The Forks vs East Village

Winnipeg’s Old World Charm

Everyday Live In Africa: Republic of Mali & the Republic of Côte d'Ivoire

This past winter I received hundreds of photos and detailed emails from Bob White (no relation) as he and his wife Anne explored remote villages in Africa for three months. The emails were fascinating as Bob shared with family and friends the trials and tribulations of travelling the back roads to get to “off the beaten path” places where they observe and capture the everyday life of Africans.

When they got back I asked if they would be interested in sharing some of their photos and experiences with Everyday Tourist blog readers as I know many of us have never been to Africa and if we have it probably wasn’t to the villages that they travelled to.

I am pleased they have agreed to share their experiences and insights with the Everyday Tourist community.

Travels with Anne & Bob

The border between Guinea and the Ivory Coast was closed during the Ebola crisis in 2014 and remained closed when we made our trip in 2016. We were forced to make a large detour into Mali before we could enter Guinea and continue our planned trip.

We stayed in the Ivory Coast resort town of Grand Bassam, where only a few months earlier three armed gunmen linked to al-Qaeda killed 19 tourists on the beach of this quiet town. We were more troubled and afraid of spending two days in this resort than our having to make a large diversion into Mali. 

 Fortunately, we had no problems during our time in the two countries, either from terrorists or Ebola.  We were welcomed and treated with friendship as was the norm during all our travels in West Africa.

Bob White

We hiked through the hills above the town of Siby, Mali to the Kamarjan Arch, a natural formation in the red sandstone cliffs. The arch and caves in the surrounding area have been used for animist and fetish religious rites for centuries.

We hiked through the hills above the town of Siby, Mali to the Kamarjan Arch, a natural formation in the red sandstone cliffs. The arch and caves in the surrounding area have been used for animist and fetish religious rites for centuries.

Women carrying their babies in slings on their backs is traditional throughout much of Africa. Women commonly clean, cook, shop and work at jobs while carrying their babies. The photo was taken in a roadside market south of Bamako, Mali.

Women carrying their babies in slings on their backs is traditional throughout much of Africa. Women commonly clean, cook, shop and work at jobs while carrying their babies. The photo was taken in a roadside market south of Bamako, Mali.

We took an early morning walk in the blocks around our hotel in the small city of Sikasso, Mali. A woman was doing a bustling business cooking up a sweet dough mix in a dimpled pan over a wood fire, a steady stream of locals bought the treats as quickly as she could cook them. We purchased a few and found they had a texture similar to a cake-style doughnut, and that they were delicious!

We took an early morning walk in the blocks around our hotel in the small city of Sikasso, Mali. A woman was doing a bustling business cooking up a sweet dough mix in a dimpled pan over a wood fire, a steady stream of locals bought the treats as quickly as she could cook them. We purchased a few and found they had a texture similar to a cake-style doughnut, and that they were delicious!

Our Lady of Peace Basilica, Yamoussoukro, Cote d’Ivoire   This huge church was built during the presidency of Felix Houphouët-Boigny, the first president of the Ivory Coast after independence from France in 1960. It can seat over 18,000 people, but normally draws only a couple of hundred for religious services in this mainly Muslim country. Houphouët-Boigny hoped that the basilica would become a pilgrimage site for African Catholics.

Our Lady of Peace Basilica, Yamoussoukro, Cote d’Ivoire

This huge church was built during the presidency of Felix Houphouët-Boigny, the first president of the Ivory Coast after independence from France in 1960. It can seat over 18,000 people, but normally draws only a couple of hundred for religious services in this mainly Muslim country. Houphouët-Boigny hoped that the basilica would become a pilgrimage site for African Catholics.

Anne Tapler White

Afternoon in the Mosque, Yamoussoukro, Cote d’Ivoire   We entered the Mosque which was quite large and spacious, cool and airy in the afternoon heat. The two girls were in a very intense conversion and did not notice my presence. What lead me to take the photo was how small they looked in such a large building.

Afternoon in the Mosque, Yamoussoukro, Cote d’Ivoire

We entered the Mosque which was quite large and spacious, cool and airy in the afternoon heat. The two girls were in a very intense conversion and did not notice my presence. What lead me to take the photo was how small they looked in such a large building.

Leading the Blind, Bouake, Cote d’Ivoire   We were sitting having tea along the main street of the town. The young girl was so attentive to the older woman, carefully guiding her along. What touched me was the young helping the old

Leading the Blind, Bouake, Cote d’Ivoire

We were sitting having tea along the main street of the town. The young girl was so attentive to the older woman, carefully guiding her along. What touched me was the young helping the old

Quarry Workers, near Korhogo, Cote d’Ivoire   We saw this work carried out both in quarries and along the roadside. It is a monumental task, breaking large boulders into gravel-sized rocks using only hand tools. The job takes many hours in the extreme heat, often entire families, including children, can be seen hammering at the rocks.

Quarry Workers, near Korhogo, Cote d’Ivoire

We saw this work carried out both in quarries and along the roadside. It is a monumental task, breaking large boulders into gravel-sized rocks using only hand tools. The job takes many hours in the extreme heat, often entire families, including children, can be seen hammering at the rocks.

Sacred Boulder, near Korhogo, Cote d’Ivoire   A short walk in sweltering heat and sun took us to this fetish site. Despite being mainly Muslim, many people rely on their animist traditions to get answers to personal problems. Fetish priests conduct rituals and animal sacrifices of chickens, sheep, and goats at this large boulder. A patch of chicken feathers stuck to the rock with blood is clearly visible. Shortly before we arrived, the lamb had been sacrificed to divine the solution to a problem. The lamb was carved into pieces for cooking and eating by the family that night.

Sacred Boulder, near Korhogo, Cote d’Ivoire

A short walk in sweltering heat and sun took us to this fetish site. Despite being mainly Muslim, many people rely on their animist traditions to get answers to personal problems. Fetish priests conduct rituals and animal sacrifices of chickens, sheep, and goats at this large boulder. A patch of chicken feathers stuck to the rock with blood is clearly visible. Shortly before we arrived, the lamb had been sacrificed to divine the solution to a problem. The lamb was carved into pieces for cooking and eating by the family that night.

Historical Postcards From The Calgary Stampede

Over the years I have collected a few old Calgary Stampede images in my photo library as I come across them in my research. Given it will soon be Stampede time in Calgary (July 5 to 14, 2019), I thought I would see just what I had and would it make for a fun blog. I didn’t really have enough so I started hunting around the internet and found some more, then I hit the motherlode - the Calgary Stampede website has dozens of old photos.

I also discovered the Calgary Stampede website is full of great information. Things like “Frequently Asked Questions” the covers almost everything you could think of asking. It also has great information on the Stampede’s Public Art Program - murals and sculptures. And, you can learn about quirky things like the history of stampede breakfasts.

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Fun Facts

If you are looking for some interesting internet reading I would highly recommend the Calgary Stampede website. Here are some fun facts:

  • Stampede Park is a bit bigger than Disneyland.

  • Each rodeo animal is inspected by a veterinarian daily to ensure their well-being.

  • Over 100,000 people visit the Stampede’s art show, making it one of the biggest art exhibitions on the prairies.

  • Over 2,300 volunteers help to make the Calgary Stampede happen each year.

  • The world’s tallest flagpole (204 feet) is located at the Elbow River Camp, formerly the Indian Village.

  • It wasn’t until 1968 that the Stampede became a 10 day event.

  • Did you know there is a App for locating where Stampede breakfasts are located?

  • The University of Calgary is heavily involved in the Calgary Stampede. Researchers in the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine provide critical advice and innovative solutions to ensure animal care practices are cutting edge. The Galileo Educational Network, within the Werklund School of Education, developed a website to educate people on the long-standing and important history of the Treaty Seven Nations at the Stampede.Historians and experts in the faculty of arts have written the book on the Calgary Stampede and teach a Canadian Studies course on it every year.

Link: The Calgary Stampede and Treaty Seven Nations

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Fun historical postcards from the Calgary Stampede.

FYI: There are two postcards at the end that I expect will surprise many of you!

Note the horse is wearing a hat and smoking a cigar…Indeed the world has changed dramatically over the past 100+ years.

Note the horse is wearing a hat and smoking a cigar…Indeed the world has changed dramatically over the past 100+ years.

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A Sky scaper foreshadows Calgary become a skyscraper city by the end of the 20th century?

A Sky scaper foreshadows Calgary become a skyscraper city by the end of the 20th century?

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Stampede Park early 20th century

Stampede Park early 20th century

1953

1953

Stampede Parade along Calgary’s historic Stephen Avenue. The first Stampede Parade was held in 1912 and was attended by 75,000 people and included 1,800 First Nation individuals.

Stampede Parade along Calgary’s historic Stephen Avenue. The first Stampede Parade was held in 1912 and was attended by 75,000 people and included 1,800 First Nation individuals.

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On the morning of July 9, 1923 (first day of Stampede) Guy Weadick persuaded some of the chuckwagon drivers to go downtown to give a glimpse of their wagons to the public. Jack Morton unloaded his stoves and set up shop cooking pancakes and giving them out free to those who had come out to watch. And that’s how the free stampede breakfast history got started.  LInk:  Stampede Breakfast History

On the morning of July 9, 1923 (first day of Stampede) Guy Weadick persuaded some of the chuckwagon drivers to go downtown to give a glimpse of their wagons to the public. Jack Morton unloaded his stoves and set up shop cooking pancakes and giving them out free to those who had come out to watch. And that’s how the free stampede breakfast history got started.

LInk: Stampede Breakfast History

Yes the Stampede was held in Winnipeg in 1913. Imagine how Calgary and Winnipeg would be different today if Winnipeg was home of the “Greatest Outdoor Show On Earth” not Calgary.

Yes the Stampede was held in Winnipeg in 1913. Imagine how Calgary and Winnipeg would be different today if Winnipeg was home of the “Greatest Outdoor Show On Earth” not Calgary.

Yes in the 1960s the Calgary Stampede looked at moving from its current downtown location to the outskirts fo the city near the intersection of today’s Glenmore and Crowchild Trails. Imagine how the would have change Calgary’s inner-city development.

Yes in the 1960s the Calgary Stampede looked at moving from its current downtown location to the outskirts fo the city near the intersection of today’s Glenmore and Crowchild Trails. Imagine how the would have change Calgary’s inner-city development.

Last Word

Today the Calgary Stampede has evolved into one of the world’s most unique festivals. In fact, it combines seven different festivals offering something for almost everyone:

  1. Agricultural Fair

  2. Rodeo

  3. Chuckwagon Races

  4. Grandstand Show

  5. Midway

  6. Music Festival

  7. Visual Art Festival

When I first moved to Calgary I have to admit I wasn’t a big fan of the Stampede, but over the past 35+ years I have developed an appreciation for how it has shaped the city and given it a unique sense of place. While not everyone appreciates what the Calgary Stampede does for the City locally, nationally and internationally, in my opinion, every city needs a mega festival like the Caglary Stampede that annually celebrates its unique history and sense of place.

A mega makeover is planned for the Stampede Park over the next decade that will hopefully allow it to continue be evolve and be something Calgarians can continue to be proud of.

Link: Calgary Stampede Digital Collection

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Flaneuring Stampede Poster Parade

Colourful Stampede Parade of Postcards

Stampede Park 2025

Stampede Park: Art Gallery / Museum

Postcards from Kimberley BC

As an avid golfer I am always looking for new challenges and new courses to play, so when some golf buddies said they were planning a golf trip to Kimberley I quickly said, “I’m in.” Kimberley BC has become a popular golf destination over the past several years, with the addition of new courses like Wildstone, Canada’s first Black Knight Designed course by the golf legend Gary Player.

The tourism people have also come up with a clever “Golf 24/7 in Kimberley” promotion, based on the fact there are 7 golf courses within 24 minutes in the area.

But there is more to Kimberley than golf!

Kimberley might just be the gnome capital of Canada as I found them everywhere.

Kimberley might just be the gnome capital of Canada as I found them everywhere.

Will be back…

While we were rained out on the day we were suppose to play Wildstone, we did get to play Bootleg Gap, St. Eugene Mission and Shadow Mountain. Each course offered some of the most spectacular mountain views and dramatic elevation changes of any place I have played. Each course had a signature hole with a huge elevation drop from tee to green.

I expect we will have to go back next year so we can play Wildstone, as well as Trickle Creek, Kimberley Golf & Country Club and the Cranbrook Golf & Country Club.

The dramatic light and the rock formations along the Kimberly area golf courses can be very distracting for the serious golfer.

The dramatic light and the rock formations along the Kimberly area golf courses can be very distracting for the serious golfer.

Cuckoo Clock Fame

Kimberley is more than just a golf destination, it is year-round recreation mecca for skiers, cyclists, hikers and fishermen. It is known as Canada’s Bavarian City with its lovely downtown pedestrian mall lined with shops, restaurants and cafes housed in Bavarian-like architecture. It even has the world largest cuckoo clock.

One of the attractions that caught my attention was the unique Kimberley Underground Mining Railway that travels through the beautiful Mark Creek valley and into the historic Sullivan Mine. You get to learn about life as a miner at the Underground Interpretive Centre from a retired miner and guided tour featuring the huge compressors and generators that powered the mine. Sounds like fun!

Link: Tourism Kimberley

Link: Kimberley Underground Railway Video

Here are some postcards from my Kimberley trip, hope you enjoy them….

Wandering the streets of Kimberley you will find lots of strange things like this enchanting tiny house?

Wandering the streets of Kimberley you will find lots of strange things like this enchanting tiny house?

Deer are like dogs in Kimberley. It is common to find them lying in people’s front and backyards like they live there. I guess in some ways they do.

Deer are like dogs in Kimberley. It is common to find them lying in people’s front and backyards like they live there. I guess in some ways they do.

Loved this patio at  Pedal and Tap  with its bikes…there are also several vintage bikes inside, as well as some good beer.

Loved this patio at Pedal and Tap with its bikes…there are also several vintage bikes inside, as well as some good beer.

Gotta love the name.

Gotta love the name.

The  Spirit Rock Climbing Centre  is one of several more contemporary buildings now populating downtown Kimberley.

The Spirit Rock Climbing Centre is one of several more contemporary buildings now populating downtown Kimberley.

St. Eugene Mission

While in the Kimberley area a trip to the St. Eugene Mission is well worth it, not only for the golf course but for the history.

Link: St. Eugene Mission History

The St.Eugene Church was built in 1897 and restored in 2016.

The St.Eugene Church was built in 1897 and restored in 2016.

For more than half a century, the hated brick building of the St. Eugene Mission swallowed up native children and spit them back out, traumatized and damaged from their years of family separation, cultural assimilation and worse.  Even after the Catholic-run residential school closed its doors for good in 1970, deep physical and emotional scars remained.  As the abandoned building deteriorated, most natives wanted it torn down. But the old school, whose three storeys loom over the reserve of the St. Mary's Band of the Ktunaxa Nation Council, did not succumb to the wrecker's ball.  Instead, in a remarkable, one-of-a-kind turnaround, the St. Eugene Mission has been transformed into a handsome, upscale hotel, with an adjacent casino and championship, 7,000-yard golf course.  Read more: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/residential-school-goes-from-tragedy-to-triumph/article4439666/

For more than half a century, the hated brick building of the St. Eugene Mission swallowed up native children and spit them back out, traumatized and damaged from their years of family separation, cultural assimilation and worse.

Even after the Catholic-run residential school closed its doors for good in 1970, deep physical and emotional scars remained.

As the abandoned building deteriorated, most natives wanted it torn down. But the old school, whose three storeys loom over the reserve of the St. Mary's Band of the Ktunaxa Nation Council, did not succumb to the wrecker's ball.

Instead, in a remarkable, one-of-a-kind turnaround, the St. Eugene Mission has been transformed into a handsome, upscale hotel, with an adjacent casino and championship, 7,000-yard golf course.

Read more:https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/residential-school-goes-from-tragedy-to-triumph/article4439666/

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The Golf Courses

Found what could be the world’s largest sand trap when we played Shadow Mountain. Fortunately the course designer did not incorporate it into the golf course - unless you really hook the ball.

Found what could be the world’s largest sand trap when we played Shadow Mountain. Fortunately the course designer did not incorporate it into the golf course - unless you really hook the ball.

Shadow Mountain’s signature hole.

Shadow Mountain’s signature hole.

St. Eugene’s signature hole.

St. Eugene’s signature hole.

The St. Eugene Golf course has interesting information panels at every tee box. Reminded me of the Catholic church’s “stations of the cross.”

The St. Eugene Golf course has interesting information panels at every tee box. Reminded me of the Catholic church’s “stations of the cross.”

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Just one of the many dramatic view you encounter when golfing in the Kimberley area.

Just one of the many dramatic view you encounter when golfing in the Kimberley area.

If you find yourself travelling in the Kimberley/Cranbrook area be sure to get off the highway and check out the small towns and villages.

If you find yourself travelling in the Kimberley/Cranbrook area be sure to get off the highway and check out the small towns and villages.

Calgary's Historical Architecture: Then & Now

Though I’ve never been a big history buff, I do appreciation of the importance of preserving historical buildings and sites.They are critical to telling a city’s story and creating a unique sense of place.

Calgary is often criticized for focusing too much on the prosperity of the present and future at the expense of the preservation of the past. For many (including me) our philosophy is “we are creating Calgary’s history today.” But cities really are built over decades and centuries, not years.

To me, Calgary is just a young teenager striving to find its own identity, its own personality.

I thought it would be interesting to look back and see what buildings we have lost over the past 100 years that we might like to still have today. And to see what has replaced them.

Entrance to Grain Exchange Building

Entrance to Grain Exchange Building

Hull Opera House (606, Centre St. S.)

Imagine it is the early 1890s. Calgary rancher, entrepreneur and philanthropist William Roper just commissioned a 1,000-seat opera house be built at 606 Centre St. S. (known as McTavish Street until 1904) by architects Child and Wilson at a cost of $10,000. One of Calgary’s first major sandstone and brick buildings, it hosted opera, theatre, school concerts, and community dances. It is hard to believe a frontier city with a population of only 4,000 people could support such a large opera house. But it did, for 13 years anyway.

In 1906, it was renovated to accommodate street level retail, residential on the upper floors and renamed the Albion Block. Then in 1960s, George Crystal bought the building and demolished it to create parking for his adjacent York Hotel. The York Hotel was demolished to make way for the Bow office tower, (its facade brickwork is now safely numbered and stored so it can be integrated into a new building on the corner of Centre Street and 7th Avenue S.W. sometime in the future).

So, we lost one icon and gained another in the Bow Tower. If we still had the Hull Opera House, it would have made a great public market, along the same lines as the Centro Market in Florence, Italy.



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CPR Train Station (115 9th Ave. S.E.)

Yes, Calgary had a downtown train station, but I have been told it wasn’t anything as grand as say Grand Central Station or Penn Station in New York City. It wasn’t even as grand as Winnipeg’s train stations given that in the late 19th century, it was Winnipeg that was going to be capital of the prairies and the rival to Chicago. It was a time of Winnipeg’s heyday – it boasted the most millionaires per capita in North America. Calgary, on the other hand, was still a frontier town with a population 4,000 people. My, my, how times have changed!

Calgary’s CPR station was demolished in 1966, making way for the Palliser Square and Calgary Tower (then called the Husky Tower) as part of a Calgary’s first modern urban renewal project that included the Convention Centre, Marriott Hotel (the Four Seasons Hotel) and the Glenbow.

I now think our historic train station would have made a great modern art gallery like the Musee d’Orsay in Paris.

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The CPR train station it home today to the Calgary Tower and Palliser Square.

The CPR train station it home today to the Calgary Tower and Palliser Square.


Central (James Short) School (Centre Street S. between 4th and 5th avenues)

James Short School was Calgary’s first large three-story square sandstone school. It proudly opened as Central School in 1905 and was noted for its impressive cupola above the entrance. When, by the late ’60s, the school-age population in downtown wasn’t sufficient to keep the school open, all but the cupola (now located on the northwest corner of Centre Street S. and 5th Avenue) was demolished to make way for redevelopment.

Today, James Short (a pioneer teacher, principal of the school and later a school board member, he was also the lawyer for the Anti-Chinese League) is best known as a park and parkade. If it were still around today, what a great boutique hotel it would make.

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James Short Park today.

James Short Park today.

Southam (Calgary Herald) Building (130 7th Ave. S.W.)

The Southam Building was touted as the “finest home of any newspaper in Canada” when it opened its doors in 1913. It was well known for its terracotta gargoyles (made by Doulton Lambeth of England) that adorned the roofline and depicted various newspaper trades.

Built in 1913, this magnificent Gothic structure was occupied by the Calgary Herald until 1932, when the paper needed more space. In the 1940s, the building was sold to Greyhound, which used it for 30-plus years as a bus depot, gutting the main floor to allow for the buses to drive through. Eventually demolished in 1972, it made way for the Len Werry Building. All of the gargoyles were rescued when the building was demolished in 1972 and some can now be found on the second floor of the north building of the TELUS Convention Centre.

Today, it would have a phenomenal character office building.

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The Calgary Herald building site is now home to Brookfield Place office tower and plaza.

The Calgary Herald building site is now home to Brookfield Place office tower and plaza.

Burns Residence (501 13th Ave. S.W.)

Patrick Burns, a rancher, businessman and one of the “Big Four” who founded the Calgary Stampede, built his grand mansion with ornate sandstone carvings in 1901. Designed by the famous Victoria, B.C., architect Francis M. Rattenbury, the mansion and English garden rivalled the still-standing 1891 Lougheed House and garden two blocks west on 13th Avenue. It is hard to imagine that 13th Avenue S.W. was Calgary’s millionaires’ row a hundred years ago. The Burns mansion was demolished in 1956, replaced by the Colonel Belcher Hospital, which in turn got demolished to build the Sheldon Chumir Health Centre, which opened in 2008.

The Burns Manor restaurant and lounge would have a nice ring to it, a bigger version of Rouge (in the Cross House) in Inglewood.

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Burns residence site is now home to the Sheldon Chumir Health Centre.

Burns residence site is now home to the Sheldon Chumir Health Centre.

Stephen Avenue East

Calgary historian Harry Sanders would like to have back the entire east end of 8th Avenue all the way to 4th Street S.E. It was all demolished in the 1970s and ’80s clearing the way for the Municipal Building, Olympic Plaza and the Epcor Centre (Calgary’s second attempt at modern urban renewal).  Sanders imagines a lively pedestrian street full of small shops, cafes and restaurants all the way from Holt Renfrew (the façade of the current Holt Renfrew building is that of Calgary’s old Eaton’s department store) to East Village.

Indeed, downtown Calgary lacks a grand boulevard or wide prairie Main Street typical of most major cities. For all of its charm and character, Stephen Avenue still lacks a WOW factor (expect perhaps at lunch hour in the summer).

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Stephen Avenue today.

Stephen Avenue today.

Stephen Avenue today.

Stephen Avenue today.

Last Word

While some may lament the loss of some of Calgary’s sense of the past, in many ways we have done a better job of preserving our history than most people think. Most of the buildings along Inglewood’s Atlantic Avenue (Calgary’s first Main Street) have been preserved.

As well, Stephen Avenue’s 100 and 200 West blocks are designated National Historic District. And, while the Fort Calgary was not preserved, there is a major effort today to preserve the spirit of the place and two of the original buildings. We also have a wonderful collection of buildings from our Sandstone period, including the Memorial Park Library and McDougall School.

That being said, it would still be nice to have a few more historical buildings with their different facade materials and architectural styles to add more visual variety in our downtown.

In the words of poet William Cowper, “Variety is the spice of life, that gives it all its flavour (The Task, 1785).

Note: This blog was originally published in the Calgary Herald in 2015.

If you like this blog, you might be interested in these links:

Discover Calgary’s Secret Heritage Walk

Understanding Calgary’s DNA

Calgary’s Motel History

Calgary vs Vancouver: Affordability & Livability

After recently spending a month living in the middle of Vancouver’s City Centre, exploring its different communities and checking out its condo market, I kept asking myself – how can millennials afford to live there?

And, for that matter how can empty nesters retire there? 

Calgary’s has numerous chill spots like Cold Garden a craft brewery in Inglewood that makes its City Centre a very attractive place to live, work and play.

Calgary’s has numerous chill spots like Cold Garden a craft brewery in Inglewood that makes its City Centre a very attractive place to live, work and play.

Dude Chilling Park is just one of many parks and public spaces that makes Vancouver’s City Centre one of the best places in North America for urban living.

Dude Chilling Park is just one of many parks and public spaces that makes Vancouver’s City Centre one of the best places in North America for urban living.

Affordability

The cost of a used condo in Vancouver is about $1,000/square foot. Translated, this means a modest 750 square foot condo is going to cost you $750,000. If you want a new 1,300 square foot condo be prepared to pay $2,000/square foot or $2,600,000.  That is more than twice the cost of a similar condo in Calgary.  

While you expect to pay a premium to live in downtown Vancouver because of its climate and amenities like Stanley Park, beaches and sea wall, that’s still a pretty stiff price to pay.  

I came away feeling Calgary’s City Centre communities while not on par with Vancouver’s in the way of amenities are not that far behind in their evolution as urban villages and all of them have significant upside potential.  

In chatting with several people in Vancouver and Calgary over the past few months I have often heard Calgary’s City Centre being called a “hidden gem” when it comes to urban living with potential to get even better.  

Let’s compare Calgary’s urban communities with Vancouver’s. 

Food trucks help to animate public spaces throughout Vancouver’s City Centre.

Food trucks help to animate public spaces throughout Vancouver’s City Centre.

Calgary’s City Centre has an amazing patio scene.

Calgary’s City Centre has an amazing patio scene.

Calgary also has a great pedestrian mall that is part of a National Historic District.

Calgary also has a great pedestrian mall that is part of a National Historic District.

The stairs in front of the Vancouver Art Gallery is a popular place to chill and catch some sun.

The stairs in front of the Vancouver Art Gallery is a popular place to chill and catch some sun.

Calgary also has some pretty cool places to sit.

Calgary also has some pretty cool places to sit.

Vancouver’s City Centre has numerous high streets offering upscale and fun places to shop.

Vancouver’s City Centre has numerous high streets offering upscale and fun places to shop.

Calgary has its fair share of quirky places to shop, including NERD a shop in Inglewood that specializes in fashion and accessories for roller skating.

Calgary has its fair share of quirky places to shop, including NERD a shop in Inglewood that specializes in fashion and accessories for roller skating.

Vancouver’s City Centre has dozens of funky residential developments.

Vancouver’s City Centre has dozens of funky residential developments.

It doesn’t get much cooler than the front entrance to Pixel condo in Calgary’s Kensington Village.

It doesn’t get much cooler than the front entrance to Pixel condo in Calgary’s Kensington Village.

Unless it might be the Colours condo in Calgary’s hipster Beltline community.

Unless it might be the Colours condo in Calgary’s hipster Beltline community.

Vancouver has is fair share of fun strange red sculptures.

Vancouver has is fair share of fun strange red sculptures.

Calgary Peace Bridge is one of North America’s signature pedestrian bridges.

Calgary Peace Bridge is one of North America’s signature pedestrian bridges.

Vancouver Art Gallery has funky exhibitions.

Vancouver Art Gallery has funky exhibitions.

Calgary’s Glenbow Museum has fun exhibitions also.

Calgary’s Glenbow Museum has fun exhibitions also.

Calgary’s City Centre has tons of things to see and do.

Calgary’s City Centre has tons of things to see and do.

Vancouver House is that city’s newest weird and wacky architecture.

Vancouver House is that city’s newest weird and wacky architecture.

Calgary has its fair share of weird and wacky architecture and public art.

Calgary has its fair share of weird and wacky architecture and public art.

Beltline vs West End 

In many ways, Calgary’s Beltline is the equivalent of Vancouver’s West End, with its tree-lined streets populated by a mix of old single family homes, scattered amongst small mid-century apartments and new mega highrise towers. The Beltline’s 17thAve is akin to Robson Street but with less shopping and more patios.  Tenth and 11th Aves are the equivalent to Davie St and Beltline’s 1st, 4th, 8th, 11th and 14th Street pedestrian corridors are Vancouver’s Denman St.  The Beltline’s Lougheed House and Beaulieu Gardens is much nicer than the West End’s Roedde House Museum and grounds.  

Calgary’s Memorial Park is very similar to the West End’s Nelson Park in scale but Memorial Park is home to a historic library that includes a very cool musical instrument lending program.  But the Beltline can’t match the West End’s amazing Mole Hill community housing block that includes the preservation of several century homes and a quaint garden pathway.  Both communities are home to their city’s respective LGBTQ communities. 

Where Vancouver’s West End really shines is in its easy access to parks and pathways along English Bay and Stanley Park. While Calgary’s Beltliners are land locked with no direct access to a major park or the Bow and Elbow Rivers. 

Link: Beltline Embraces Density

It is hard to beat Vancouver’s English Bay as an urban playground.

It is hard to beat Vancouver’s English Bay as an urban playground.

Vancouver’s West End streets not only have lovely tree canopies, but also enchanting front yards that gives it a very residential sense of place.

Vancouver’s West End streets not only have lovely tree canopies, but also enchanting front yards that gives it a very residential sense of place.

Vancouver’s West End is a mix of modern and traditional architecture.

Vancouver’s West End is a mix of modern and traditional architecture.

Calgary’s Beltline also funky modern architecture like Mark on 10th, which also has a roof top with hot tub, BBQ, kitchen and lounge for residents to mix and mingle. And yes we have food truck too.

Calgary’s Beltline also funky modern architecture like Mark on 10th, which also has a roof top with hot tub, BBQ, kitchen and lounge for residents to mix and mingle. And yes we have food truck too.

Calgary’s 17th Avenue is lined with sidewalk patios that make for great people watching.

Calgary’s 17th Avenue is lined with sidewalk patios that make for great people watching.

17th Avenue also has a diverse independent cafe culture.

17th Avenue also has a diverse independent cafe culture.

Jim Deva Plaza is a fun place for people of all ages to hang out along Davie Street.

Jim Deva Plaza is a fun place for people of all ages to hang out along Davie Street.

The Beltline’s equivalent would be Tomkins Park.

The Beltline’s equivalent would be Tomkins Park.

Vancouver’s West End has funky bike racks.

Vancouver’s West End has funky bike racks.

Calgary’s Beltline also has funky bike racks.

Calgary’s Beltline also has funky bike racks.

The Beltine has several pedestrian oriented main streets with pubs, patios, shops and restaurants.

The Beltine has several pedestrian oriented main streets with pubs, patios, shops and restaurants.

While the Beltline may not have as many grocery stores at the West End it has two major grocery stores as well as several specialty grocers like Community Natural Foods.

While the Beltline may not have as many grocery stores at the West End it has two major grocery stores as well as several specialty grocers like Community Natural Foods.

East Village vs Yaletown 

 East Village and the proposed new alliance with Victoria Park and Stampede Park could well become Calgary’s equivalent to Vancouver’s Yaletown. Give it time.  Yaletown had a head start, its transformation into a funky place to live began in the early ‘90s. East Village’s mega makeover started about 15 years later.  

The master plans are surprisingly similar, build highrise residential development next to an iconic new library, along with some major sports and entertainment facilities and a multi-use pathway along the water and people will want to live there. 

Link: East Village a billion dollar work of art!

Vancouver’s signature central library in Yaletown.

Vancouver’s signature central library in Yaletown.

Calgary’s signature new central library in East Village

Calgary’s signature new central library in East Village

The ARC a new residential building in Yaletown has fun hole in the middle.

The ARC a new residential building in Yaletown has fun hole in the middle.

Calgary’s National Music Centre is the gateway between East Village and Victoria/Stampede Park.

Calgary’s National Music Centre is the gateway between East Village and Victoria/Stampede Park.

Calgary’s East Village has nothing to match Granville Street with its mix of bars, clubs, shops, hotels and offices.

Calgary’s East Village has nothing to match Granville Street with its mix of bars, clubs, shops, hotels and offices.

Yaletown’s pedestrian pathway is lined with residential buildings.

Yaletown’s pedestrian pathway is lined with residential buildings.

Calgary’s RiverWalk in East Village is a popular chill place.

Calgary’s RiverWalk in East Village is a popular chill place.

There are several parks located along Yaletown’s pathway.

There are several parks located along Yaletown’s pathway.

East Village Plaza is a poplar meeting place and the gateway to St. Patrick Island.

East Village Plaza is a poplar meeting place and the gateway to St. Patrick Island.

St. Patrick’s Island’s pebble beach is located next to East Village.

St. Patrick’s Island’s pebble beach is located next to East Village.

East Village’s skyline is changing rapidly with new residential towers being added every year..

East Village’s skyline is changing rapidly with new residential towers being added every year..

East Village’s Fort Calgary is a popular outdoor concert venue in the summer.

East Village’s Fort Calgary is a popular outdoor concert venue in the summer.

Eau Claire / Downtown West vs Coal Harbour

Eau Claire and Downtown West combined are Calgary’s equivalent to Coal Harbour with their modern high-rise residential towers lined up along the water’s edge.  In this case, the master plans differ.  Coal Harbour is home to Vancouver’s mega convention centre and cruise ship terminal making it a tourist hub, whereas Calgary’s Eau Claire/Downtown West is more focused on recreational amenities for residents including the Bow River pathway, Prince’s Island Park, Shaw Millennium Park and Eau Claire Y.  

Eau Claire and Downtown West have tremendous potential, especially if you add in West Village which could become a funky innovation campus for start-ups businesses, perhaps even the next Amazon, Google or Apple if we play our cards right. 

Link: Downtown West a quiet evolution

Vancouver’s Coal Harbour is a boater’s paradise.

Vancouver’s Coal Harbour is a boater’s paradise.

Calgary’s Eau Claire shoreline.

Calgary’s Eau Claire shoreline.

Calgary’s Downtown West shoreline.

Calgary’s Downtown West shoreline.

Coal Harbour’s waterfront pathway

Coal Harbour’s waterfront pathway

The new West Eau Claire Park pebble beach is the perfect sunset watching spot with the Peace Bridge on the horizon.

The new West Eau Claire Park pebble beach is the perfect sunset watching spot with the Peace Bridge on the horizon.

River surfing on the Bow River is popular at the Louise Bridge in Eau Claire

River surfing on the Bow River is popular at the Louise Bridge in Eau Claire

Calgary’s old science centre planetarium in West Downtown is currently being converted into a public art gallery.

Calgary’s old science centre planetarium in West Downtown is currently being converted into a public art gallery.

Calgary’s West Village has huge potential to become a vibrant urban village on the Bow River.

Calgary’s West Village has huge potential to become a vibrant urban village on the Bow River.

Shaw Millennium Park, combined with the new civic art gallery will become the heart of vibrant urban community in the near future. Photo credit: Canadian Society of Landscape Architects

Shaw Millennium Park, combined with the new civic art gallery will become the heart of vibrant urban community in the near future. Photo credit: Canadian Society of Landscape Architects

Across the Water 

Hillhurst, Sunnyside, Bridgeland and Crescent Heights being across water from downtown have many parallels to Vancouver’s Kitsilano and False Creek. “No way” you say! 

From an urban living perspective Calgary’s northsiders have two islands playgrounds. St. Patrick’s Island (which officially belongs to Bridgeland Riverside, not East Village) and St. George’s Island aka Calgary Zoo offer locals an urban playground for families that is hard to beat.  

Granville Island is the urban playground for those living in Kits and False Creek, however, Granville Island is more a tourist attraction than an amenity for residents. You can find fresh food at better prices in lots of places and without the crowds, than Granville’s Farmers’ Market. While Kitsilano’s 4th Street and West Broadway are its two pedestrian streets, Calgary’s north shore communities have 10th St and Kensington Road as their traditional main streets, with budding new main streets along Edmonton Trail, Centre Street and 8th Street.

While Calgary’s north shore communities don’t have the beaches of Kitsilano, they do have some lovely parks with stunning view of the mountains and the downtown skyline. 

Link: Calgary’s NoBow: Jane Jacobs could live here

Calgary can’t match the Kitsilano beach.

Calgary can’t match the Kitsilano beach.

Calgarians like to dress up when then go fishing on the weekend.

Calgarians like to dress up when then go fishing on the weekend.

Kitsilano’s Main Street is lined with shops, cafes and restaurants.

Kitsilano’s Main Street is lined with shops, cafes and restaurants.

Kits is home to both a Whole Foods Market and Safeway grocery store.

Kits is home to both a Whole Foods Market and Safeway grocery store.

Kits is home to numerous great restaurants. We had a great lunch at Jam Cafe, where there is almost always a line-up.

Kits is home to numerous great restaurants. We had a great lunch at Jam Cafe, where there is almost always a line-up.

Kitsilano has several fun murals.

Kitsilano has several fun murals.

Vancouver’s City Centre is also home to Granville Island with its Public Market.

Vancouver’s City Centre is also home to Granville Island with its Public Market.

Vancouver’s False Creek residents enjoy easy access to the waterfront and Granville Island.

Vancouver’s False Creek residents enjoy easy access to the waterfront and Granville Island.

Calgary’s Crescent Height stairs not only offer a great workout but spectacular views of downtown and the Rocky Mountains..

Calgary’s Crescent Height stairs not only offer a great workout but spectacular views of downtown and the Rocky Mountains..

Tobogganing is popular with families in Bridgeland.

Tobogganing is popular with families in Bridgeland.

In Calgary’s City Centre there are street festivals pretty much ever weekend from May to September like this one outside Bridgland’s iconic Lukes Drug Mart a funky cafe, record store, grocery store, drugstore and post office.

In Calgary’s City Centre there are street festivals pretty much ever weekend from May to September like this one outside Bridgland’s iconic Lukes Drug Mart a funky cafe, record store, grocery store, drugstore and post office.

Bridgeland/Riverside has a tool lending library - how cool is that?

Bridgeland/Riverside has a tool lending library - how cool is that?

Coming soon to Bridgeland is the mixed-use Dominon project which will include a co-work space, as well as retail and restaurant.

Coming soon to Bridgeland is the mixed-use Dominon project which will include a co-work space, as well as retail and restaurant.

Calgary’s Kensington Village has two Main Street - 10th St and Kensington Road.

Calgary’s Kensington Village has two Main Street - 10th St and Kensington Road.

Kensington Village is home to the iconic Plaza theatre.

Kensington Village is home to the iconic Plaza theatre.

Kensington Village has numerous great restaurants with sidewalk summer patios.

Kensington Village has numerous great restaurants with sidewalk summer patios.

Kensington also has the fun Container Bar.

Kensington also has the fun Container Bar.

The Bow to Bluff along the LRT tracks in Sunnyside is now fully funded and will create a fun urban gathering space for all ages.

The Bow to Bluff along the LRT tracks in Sunnyside is now fully funded and will create a fun urban gathering space for all ages.

Funky new condos are popping up everywhere in and around Kensington Village.

Funky new condos are popping up everywhere in and around Kensington Village.

Mission vs South Granville

Mission/Erlton and 4th St SW is Calgary’s equivalent to Vancouver’s South Granville.  Both have a main street with upscale shops, galleries and restaurants, mixed in with some mid-rise residential development.  

Mission/Erlton residents have the added bonus of the Elbow River in their backyard and easy access to Stampede Park and Repsol Sports Centre.  

South Granville has more in the way of shops and galleries, as well as the historic Stanley Theatre for its residents to enjoy. 

Link: Mission is marvellous

The Stanley Theatre anchors South Granville street.

The Stanley Theatre anchors South Granville street.

South Granville has numerous mid-century apartments.

South Granville has numerous mid-century apartments.

The side street next to South Granville have lots of smaller apartments, very similar to those found in Calgary’s Mission and Cliff Bungalow.

The side street next to South Granville have lots of smaller apartments, very similar to those found in Calgary’s Mission and Cliff Bungalow.

Meinhardt has been been a Western Canadian culinary destination since it opened in 1996.

Meinhardt has been been a Western Canadian culinary destination since it opened in 1996.

Calgary’s summer festival season kicks off each year with the Lilac Festival along 4th Street in Mission.

Calgary’s summer festival season kicks off each year with the Lilac Festival along 4th Street in Mission.

River rafting along the Elbow River through Mission is popular in the summer.

River rafting along the Elbow River through Mission is popular in the summer.

Mission’s 4th Street is lined with restaurants, cafes, galleries and shops.

Mission’s 4th Street is lined with restaurants, cafes, galleries and shops.

Historic Districts

Inglewood / Ramsay with its historic main street has many of the attributes of Vancouver’s Gastown, without the hordes of tourist, that make living there a nightmare in the summer.  The 2010 completion of the historic Woodward department store site redevelopment was the catalyst for Gastown’s revitalization. It includes a mix of uses from affordable and market housing to SFU School for Contemporary Arts, from the National Film Board office to a grocery and drug store.  

Inglewood’s revitalization was the result of Main Street Program in the ‘90s that focused on the façade restoration of the historic buildings along 9thAvenue to create a mixed-use pedestrian street. More recently new commercial buildings like the Atlantic Avenue Arts Block and West Canadian Digital Imaging building become workplace anchors for its main street.   

As well, several recent condo developments, co-work spaces and numerous craft breweries have made Inglewood/Ramsay a very attractive place to live, work and play.   

Inglewood’s Calgary Brewery site and Ramsay’s Dominion Bridge site and the coming Green Line all have the potential to make Inglewood/Ramsay a model for 21stcentury urban living.

While Calgary’s Chinatown is much smaller than Vancouver’s, it benefits from not having the spillover of undesirable activities from East Hastings. 

Link: Inglewood Calgary’s most unique community

Vancouver’s Gastown is very popular with tourists.

Vancouver’s Gastown is very popular with tourists.

Gastown is becoming increasingly popular as a place to live with the redevelopment of the old Woodwards department store.

Gastown is becoming increasingly popular as a place to live with the redevelopment of the old Woodwards department store.

Gastown streets are not only filled with pedestrians but cars also.

Gastown streets are not only filled with pedestrians but cars also.

Inglewood is getting a mega makeover with several new mixed-use condo buildings along its main street.

Inglewood is getting a mega makeover with several new mixed-use condo buildings along its main street.

Inglewood is home to Canada’s Knifewear’s flagship store as well as numerous other independent shops, restaurants, pubs and shops.

Inglewood is home to Canada’s Knifewear’s flagship store as well as numerous other independent shops, restaurants, pubs and shops.

Inglewood is home to Recordland one of Canada’s biggest and best used record stores.

Inglewood is home to Recordland one of Canada’s biggest and best used record stores.

Inglewood is home to Calgary’s live music scene.

Inglewood is home to Calgary’s live music scene.

Inglewood’s Harvie Passage is fun for hikers, kayakers and bikers.

Inglewood’s Harvie Passage is fun for hikers, kayakers and bikers.

Gotta love public art that you can climb on like this one at Inglewood’s Harvie Passage

Gotta love public art that you can climb on like this one at Inglewood’s Harvie Passage

In My Opinion

As a place to live, Calgary’s City Centre offers as much to its residents in the way of festivals, entertainment, culture, restaurants, bars, shops, parks and pathways as does Vancouver’s. 

What Calgary is missing are the amazing array of urban grocery stores - big and small - that Vancouver offers. However, this is gradually being addressed with the opening of Urban Fare in the Beltline this year and City Market in East Village next year.

What really makes Calgary’s City Center MOST attractive as a place to live is its affordability not only compared to Vancouver, but also Seattle, San Francisco and Toronto.

Now is the perfect time for Calgary to attract more young techies from across North America (who can live anywhere) to establish their live/work lifestyles and grow their businesses here. 

What is needed is a clever marketing campaign that captures the imagination of young entrepreneurs re: why Calgary is perhaps the most affordable and livable urban playground in North America. 

Theodore is Calgary’s newest City Centre condo with homes starting at $290,000.

Theodore is Calgary’s newest City Centre condo with homes starting at $290,000.

Note: An edited version of this blog was published in the Calgary Herald’s New Condos section on May 18, 2019.

 

 

Window Licking Fun In Vancouver

Those of you who are regular readers of the Everyday Tourist blogs will know I love taking photos of urban street life in storefront windows. For me, it is the best format for “street photography” as I can be incognito.

I use the term “window licking” because it sounds a bit weird and fun at the same time. The term is from the French words for window shopping, which when translated literally into English is “window licking.”

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Window Licking History

“The eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries saw an evolution in shopping spurred by a faster turnover of manufactured "fashionable" goods and an increase in department stores selling them. These shops pioneered new techniques of window display. Rather than piling their stock up - as had been common in markets and bazaars - they sold goods in mannered and self-conscious window displays, intended to sell nonessential goods.”

Link: Window Displays


There was a time when department stores would have full-time window dressers who like curators at a public art galleries, would research and carefully plan seasonal window displays to capture the pubilic’s imagination. To “wow” them to come into the store. This is still the case in fashion centres like New York, Paris, London and Milan, but not so much in places like Calgary, Edmonton, Winnipeg or Hamilton.

Selfridges in London has perhaps the most iconic storefront windows. Harry Selfridge the founder of one of the world’s signature department stores was adamant when designing his store in 1909 that it must have large windows facing the street. He even brought with him a widow dresser from the American department store Marshall Field’s which was noted for their window displays. Many of the early episodes of the TV show Mr. Selfridge focus on the importance of the windows as a means of attracting people into the store and the important role of the “window dresser” as part of the stores branding.

Today the use of street windows as a key marketing and sales tool has been forgotten by most retailers. As a result most “Main Street” experiences aren’t as much fun as they use to be.

Great cities are often defined by their great shopping or “High” streets. Places where the sidewalks are animated with people coming and going. Places, where the windows are carefully curated with art gallery-like exhibitions of objects. They can make a street become a tourist attraction.

Link: Video Selfridges Christmas window

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Vancouver Window Licking

I was pleasantly surprised to find the art of window dressing still very much alive in Vancouver, especially in the high end fashion shops along and near Alberni Street.

Link: Retailers Continue to descend on Vancouver’s Luxury Zone.

However, it wasn’t only Alberni Street. I found fun windows wherever I went from Strathcona to South Granville. Sure many of them were in upscale shops, but some of the more unique ones were in off the beaten path places like the BC Stamp Works. I found great windows in local grocery stores, as well as the Army & Navy store in New West.

Here are some of my favourite Vancouver windows….

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Last Word

In my opinion, cities today are placing too much attention (and money) on the design of the streetscape as a means of attracting people to their shopping streets. If landlords and retailer want to attract more people to visit their shops they would be far better off hiring a professional window dresser to create fun, funky and quirky windows on a regular basis - at least quarterly if not monthly.

If you like this blog you will like:

Window Licking in Paris

Window Licking in Chicago

Window Licking in Florence

A Walk In The Park: Stanley & Nose Hill

Every city should have a “must see / must do” experience.  Vancouver’s “must do” experience is to visit the city’s signature park - Stanley Park.  Indeed, it is a unique urban experience to be in the middle of an old growth forest on the edge of a downtown.  It is a walk back in time, when trees dominated the skyline, before Europeans arrived to create a city of tall glass towers that now dominates Vancouver’s peninsula skyline.  

For many, a walk in Stanley Park is the quintessential Vancouver experience.

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Walk In The Park

While recently spending a month exploring Vancouver, we took two leisurely walks in Stanley Park - one through the more natural interior and the other along the man-made sea wall that looks out into the vast space where sea meets sky.  

Soon after arriving back home to Calgary, friends suggested we get together and go for a walk, so I suggested Nose Hill Park.  

Why?

Partly because I had never walked the park - shame on me.  Partly because I wanted to compare the experience with Stanley Park knowing the two parks were polar opposites. And partly to help answer my ongoing question, “What role do parks play in defining a city?”  

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Stanley Park

Stanley Park, unlike most urban parks, is not the creation of a landscape architect’s masterplan but has evolved organically with most of the structures built between 1911 and 1937 under the supervision of Park Superintendent, W.S. Rawlings.  Much of the park remains heavily forested with an estimated half a million trees. But it also includes several man-made attractions including Vancouver Aquarium, a huge outdoor swimming pool, numerous playgrounds, two restaurants in historical buildings, a pitch and putt golf course and a large tennis facility.  It also home to one of the largest urban blue heron colonies in North America.  

Opened in 1888, the park is named after Lord Stanley, Canada’s sixth Governor General (yes, the same guy the Stanley Cup is named after) and it was designated a National Historic Site in 1988.   

It is a 4 square kilometer park at the end of a peninsula that juts out into the Burrard Inlet, a busy cargo and cruise ship passageway, as well as a recreational boating playground.  I had forgotten there is busy and noisy road through the middle of the park that links the City Centre to Vancouver’s north shore communities. 

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Nose Hill Park

Calgary’s Nose Hill Park, which covers 11 square kilometers (almost 3 times the size of Stanley Park) of rolling hills and native grasslands, is the antithesis of Stanley Park. In many ways, it is more natural than Stanley Park, as there are no attractions, not even a children’s playground.  It is a place to walk and ponder man’s place in nature. 

Historically, Nose Hill was an important site for Blackfoot Confederacy for not only was it was a place to hunt buffalo, but also a sacred place for ceremonies, and a lookout for weather and other dangers.  A recent marker representing a Siksikaitsitapi Circle signifies the world of the four nations who visited the hill - Akainai, Siksika, Piikani and Amskapipikuni.  

Peter Fidler, a Hudson Bay Company trader was the first European to visit Nose Hill in 1779 and traders continued to visit the site for the next 100 years. It was a popular place for early explorers and pioneers to experience Calgary’s Chinook winds that can raise the temperature in winter by 20 degrees Celsius in a matter of hours.  The buffalo herds that visited Nose Hill were decimated by 1879.  During Calgary’s construction boom in early 20thcentury brothels thrived on the hill.  By the 1970s the city’s had grown to the point where the site was ripe for residential development. 

Yes, Nose Hill Park almost didn’t happen! In 1971, Hartel Holdings who owned the land, planned to create a new residential community with outstanding views of the City and mountains.  However, a grassroots group of locals, consisting mostly of residents from the neighbouring North Haven community and individuals from the Calgary Field Naturalists’ Society lobbied to protect the land from development.  It wasn’t until 1984 when the Supreme Court of Canada ruled the City had the right to purchase the land, that Nose Hill Park was realized. 

Wandering the park today, you can still find evidence of the early residential development and even some of the old vehicle trails (there were no roads) as it was a popular place for Calgarians to drive to for picnics and views of the mountains in the middle of the 20thcentury.  

Nose Hill is a place to see the big picture - to ponder how man and nature have worked together over the past 100 years and wonder about the future co-existence of city’s and nature. 

I am not sure anyone would think of Nose Hill as a “must see / must do experience” but I am thinking perhaps it should be.   As one of my fellow walkers said “what I think is unique about Nose Hill Park is that it visually and spiritually brings you into contact with the essence of Alberta - grasslands, foothills, vast open space, big blue sky and grandeur of the mountains – at a glance.  

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Collective Psyche

While wandering both Stanley Park and Nose Hill Park, I could help but wonder - Is a city’s collective psyche partly shaped by its geography and climate? 

 What does the lush forest of Stanley Park (and most of Vancouver for that matter) say about Vancouver’s sense of place vs the barren beauty of Nose Hill say about Calgary’s? 

Vancouver is known for its liberal attitudes, it is the birthplace of Greenpeace and home to many environmentalists. It is an international urban playground for tourists, millennials and empty nesters.  

Calgary, on the other hand, is seen as a pragmatic, provincial, conservative corporate city full of engineers.  It is a place where young people and families come to work hard and get ahead. Calgary is home to warm Chinooks winds one day and cold blizzards winds the next, echoing the city’s boom and bust economy.  

Link: How urban parks are bringing nature closer to home?

Link: What makes a good urban park?

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Last Word 

Then again, as one of my fellow Nose Hill walkers said, “A better geographical comparison would have been Stanley Park and Calgary’s Fish Creek Park.” Guess where I will be walking soon?

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Parks are a MUST for urban living

Calgary: City of Parks & Pathways

Calgary: A brief history of Bow River Islands

The Pandrol Clip: Art vs Engineering

I bet most people just walk, drive or cycle by this object at the corner of 9th St and 4th Ave SW thinking that is just another piece of contemporary art. In fact, it is a huge Pandrol Clip that I have enjoyed for years as I walk over the Louise Bridge that connects downtown to Kensington Village.

A What? You ask?

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A Pandrol Clip?

The information panel next to the object says it is “an important component in keeping Calgary’s CTrain system together. The Pandrol Clip is part of a railway fastening system developed in 1959 by Norwegian railway engineer Per Pande Rolfsen.

Physically the clip weights less than two pounds and has a diameter of approximately 20 mm. However, this unique system offers a lightweight, low-cost rail fastener where spring and torsion works together to provide a high clamping force - each clip exerts a force of approximately two tonnes on the foot of the rail. This holds the rail foot in place, keeping the rail fastened to the underlying base-plate.

The proven benefits of the Pandrol Clip include a very long and virtually maintenance free life. It is safe, secure, can be inserted and removed manually and will continue to grip the rail under vibration. It is now used by hundreds of railways systems around the world.

But, can it also be considered art….

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Clip vs Figure vs Gate vs Frozen River vs Blue Ring vs Bloom

It has all the ingredients of sculpture - shape, space, form, line, texture. In fact it reminds me of bit of a Henry Moore reclining figure, as well as Kosso Eloul’s “Nova Gate” at the entrance to the old Nova Building downtown.

Henry Moore, Reclining Woman

Henry Moore, Reclining Woman

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Nova Gate at the 7th Avenue SW Entrance to what was originally called the Nova Tower by Kosso Eloul.

Nova Gate at the 7th Avenue SW Entrance to what was originally called the Nova Tower by Kosso Eloul.

It also reminds me of Frozen River by Stephen Glassman located next to the Emergency Operation Centre at 673 First St NE - a long way from the river. The information panel reads,  “This winding structure of local stone and bent pipe is a gesture to the native glacial and prairie landscape, and its people. Like a frozen river, the artwork appears across the horizon, fixed in motion and defying gravity.

It also reminds me of Frozen River by Stephen Glassman located next to the Emergency Operation Centre at 673 First St NE - a long way from the river. The information panel reads, “This winding structure of local stone and bent pipe is a gesture to the native glacial and prairie landscape, and its people. Like a frozen river, the artwork appears across the horizon, fixed in motion and defying gravity.

And then there is Travelling Light aka Giant Blue Ring by Inges Idee a glorified street light, which is probably as much an engineering exercise, as it is an artistic statement. (photo credit Inges Idee)

And then there is Travelling Light aka Giant Blue Ring by Inges Idee a glorified street light, which is probably as much an engineering exercise, as it is an artistic statement. (photo credit Inges Idee)

Speaking of street lights, this public art work on St. Patricks’ Island title “Bloom” by Michel de Broin, that incorporates vintage street lampposts welded to tripod is also as much an engineering feat, as an artist’s statement.

Speaking of street lights, this public art work on St. Patricks’ Island title “Bloom” by Michel de Broin, that incorporates vintage street lampposts welded to tripod is also as much an engineering feat, as an artist’s statement.

Last Word

I wonder how many other engineering objects there are like the Pandrol Clip that blur the boundary between form and function, object and art. Calgary is often called “The City of Engineers” as it has one of the highest per capital number of engineers in Canada, maybe the world.

Perhaps it is fitting that our public art and engineering communities are linked.

Sometimes Calgary’s urban design and arts communities refer to Calgary as a “city built by engineers” when frustrated by the City’s inability to embrace the arts, creativity and experimentation. Indeed, Calgary has a reputation (nationally and perhaps internationally) of being a bastion for pragmatic prairie conservatism.

Perhaps instead, we should be embracing our engineering culture and working together to create something unique. The Beakerhead festival that combines art, engineering and science was a great first step. We need to take few more steps….

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Beakerhead Festival

Confessions of a public art juror

Do we need all of this public art?

Calgary: 59+ Free Fun Things To See & Do

Every travel blogger must have a list of fun things to see and do in his/her home town.  I can’t believe I haven’t done a list before.  Better late than never, right? 

Here are my picks for FREE things to see and do with links to websites and blogs that will give you more details. I have tried to make sure the information is correct at the time of posting (May 2019) but always best to check their website before you go.  

Note: This is not a complete list of free things, but just some of the ones I know and like.  If you have others, let me know and I will add to the list.  I am short on free things to do in the suburbs as I don’t frequent those communities as often as perhaps I should.

Tourists love Calgary’s parks, plazas, public art, markets, streets, museums, art galleries, trails, pathways, promenades, rivers etc etc…..

Tourists love Calgary’s parks, plazas, public art, markets, streets, museums, art galleries, trails, pathways, promenades, rivers etc etc…..

Free Gardens

Calgary has two rock gardens to wander – Reader and Senator Patrick Burns.  The Botanical Gardens of Silver Springs (totally a community volunteer initiative) and the historic Beaulieu Gardens at Lougheed House are both delightful places to wander. Best to visit these outdoor gardens from May to September. 

Calgary’s downtown boasts two lovely indoor gardens that can be enjoyed year round – Devonian Gardens (fourth floor of The Core shopping centre) and Jamieson Place’s winter garden.

Link: Postcard from Reader Rock Garden

Link: Stop and smell the flowers in Silver Springs 

In the summer, Olympic Plaza becomes Olympic Gardens with beautiful hanging baskets, trees and other ornamentation.

In the summer, Olympic Plaza becomes Olympic Gardens with beautiful hanging baskets, trees and other ornamentation.

Historic Beaulieu Gardens at Lougheed House

Historic Beaulieu Gardens at Lougheed House

Reader Rock Garden

Reader Rock Garden

Silver Springs Botanical Garden labyrinth

Silver Springs Botanical Garden labyrinth

Devonian Gardens

Devonian Gardens

Jamieson Place’s winter garden with three David Chihuly glass sculpture, infinity ponds and living wall.

Jamieson Place’s winter garden with three David Chihuly glass sculpture, infinity ponds and living wall.

Free Museums

The YouthLink Calgary Police Interpretive Centre is fun for everyone, with educational exhibits including The Forensic Lab, True Crime Stories, as well as Alberta’s largest collection of policing artifacts – uniforms, weapons and vehicles.  

At the Grain Academy & Museum (open Monday to Friday), learn about how the prairies were settled, early pioneer life and see the world’s largest model train display showing the movement of grain from the prairies to the terminals at Vancouver. 

In the lobby of their ATCO building at 11th Ave and 8th St SW is a mini museum with artifacts from the power industry.  Both Smithbilt Hats and Alberta Boots Company have a flagship stores that double as museums with lots of artifacts. 

And the Glenbow Museum is free the first Thursday of every month after 5 pm. 

Link: Police Interpretive Centre

Link: Grain Academy & Museum

YouthLink Calgary Police Interpretive Centre

YouthLink Calgary Police Interpretive Centre

Glenbow Museum Free First Thursday Nights

Glenbow Museum Free First Thursday Nights

Grain Academy at Stampede Park

Grain Academy at Stampede Park

Free Walks in the Parks

While New York City has Central Park, Calgary has two huge parks – Nose Hill Park in the north and Fish Creek Park in the south.  Nose Hill, a natural prairie grassland park, offers spectacular 360 degree views of the prairies, city, foothills and mountains.  Fish Creek Provincial Park offers walks in a natural forest setting along a trickling creek.  These are just two of the over 5,000 parks in Calgary. 

Downtown’s Prince’s Island Park includes a small sculpture park, as well as the Chevron Learning Pathway (an innovative urban wetland environment) and fun children’s playground.  

Just a few kilometers from the City Centre is the Douglas Fir trail up the Bow River escarpment. This is the furthest east where Douglas Fir trees grow - truly a forest in the middle of the city.

The Inglewood Bird Sanctuary is a fun place to wander and see what birds, fish and mammals you can spot.  There is even a fishing pond for kids. A short walk away lies Harvie Passage where you might catch kayakers shooting the Bow River rapids. 

Link: Edmonton vs Calgary: Who has the best river valley parks?

Link: Inglewood Bird Sanctuary

Inglewood Bird Sanctuary’s fishing pond. You can easily see the trout you are trying to catch.

Inglewood Bird Sanctuary’s fishing pond. You can easily see the trout you are trying to catch.

Harvie Passage fun

Harvie Passage fun

Douglas Fir Trail (photo credit: Hiking with Barry)

Douglas Fir Trail (photo credit: Hiking with Barry)

Prince’s Island sculpture park

Prince’s Island sculpture park

Calgary has over 5,000 parks offering lots of fun walks.

Calgary has over 5,000 parks offering lots of fun walks.

Chevron Interpretive Trail is also in Princes’ Island Park

Chevron Interpretive Trail is also in Princes’ Island Park

Fish Creek Park is one of the largest urban parks in Canada. It offers numerous trails, as well as the historic Bow Valley Ranche restaurant.

Fish Creek Park is one of the largest urban parks in Canada. It offers numerous trails, as well as the historic Bow Valley Ranche restaurant.

 Free Art Galleries

For those who like art, Calgary has lots of free things to see.  The downtown is literally a free public art gallery with 100s of artworks along the sidewalks, on the plazas and in the lobbies of the larger skyscrapers.  

On the +15 level of the Centennial Parkade you will discover a herd of colourful and playful, life-size cows.   The Udderly Art Pasture is the legacy from the Colourful Cows project in 2000, when over 100 cows grazed in the downtown.  In addition to the cows the pasture has several information panels that tell the story of Calgary’s most successful public art project to date. 

Highlights include works by modern Canadian master painters Bush, Riopelle and Shadbolt at Eighth Avenue Place and Dale Chihuly glass works in Jamieson Place. 

In Calgary City Centre office tower’s lobby hangs a huge expressionistic canvas drawing (32 feet by 16 feet) in its lobby of the Zeppelin by Saskatoon artist, Alison Norlen along with 19 other artworks in the building’s public space. 

The two towers for Bankers Hall have numerous artworks in the lobbies and outside entrances including several interactive Weather Vanes in the southeast lobby that you can actually turn.  

And don’t forget to ask at Eighth Avenue Place and City Centre for their booklet about their art program. 

Calgary also has three free public art galleries. The Esker Art Gallery in the Atlantic Avenue Block in Inglewood, the Nickle Art Gallery in the Taylor Family Digital Library at the University of Calgary and the Illingworth Kerr Gallery at the Alberta Arts University (formerly called Alberta Collage of Art and Design or ACAD). All offer engaging exhibition programs. 

You should definitely check out cSpace a grand old sandstone school in Marda Loop that has been converted into artists studio, a craft gallery space and performance space. It is a fun place to explore with rotating exhibitions in the old school hallway. The preservation and repurposing of the building is exquisite.

The Beltline community just south of downtown has several murals that make for a fun walking tour, especially if you also visit the Beltline’s commercial galleries along the way – Gibson Fine Art, Herringer Kiss Gallery, Loch Gallery, Paul Kuhn, New Zones, Trepanier Baer and VivianArt.

Stampede Park also has numerous murals and artworks that are available for viewing year-round, including the Parade of Historical Posters on the 2nd floor walkway from the LRT Station to the Corral.  They too have an art walk map. 

Link: Calgary has a free public art map 

Link: Beltline Mural map 

Link: Stampede Art Walk Map

Link: Downtown’s Udderly Cow Pasture

Stampede Park has numerous murals and sculptures scattered throughout the park. At the entrance to the Park from the LRT Station on Macleod Trail is a contemporary tipi inspired sculpture - the semi-circle design depicts the historic iconography of the Kainai, Piikani, Siksika, Stoney Nakoda and Tsuut’ina nations. The sculpture sits on the original site of Stampede’s Indian Village which was Sun Tree Park.

Stampede Park has numerous murals and sculptures scattered throughout the park. At the entrance to the Park from the LRT Station on Macleod Trail is a contemporary tipi inspired sculpture - the semi-circle design depicts the historic iconography of the Kainai, Piikani, Siksika, Stoney Nakoda and Tsuut’ina nations. The sculpture sits on the original site of Stampede’s Indian Village which was Sun Tree Park.

Jack Shadbolt painting in the lobby of Eighth Avenue Place office tower is a great place to sit. There is a coffee shop right there.

Jack Shadbolt painting in the lobby of Eighth Avenue Place office tower is a great place to sit. There is a coffee shop right there.

The Cow Pasture is fun for people of all ages.

The Cow Pasture is fun for people of all ages.

There is public art on almost every block downtown, as well as in the lobbies of most office towers. Free artwalk!

There is public art on almost every block downtown, as well as in the lobbies of most office towers. Free artwalk!

Barclay Mall aka 3rd Street SW has numerous sandstone sculptures as it winds its way from Stephen Avenue to Prince’s Island.

Barclay Mall aka 3rd Street SW has numerous sandstone sculptures as it winds its way from Stephen Avenue to Prince’s Island.

Nickle Art Gallery at the University of Calgary

Nickle Art Gallery at the University of Calgary

The Esker Art Gallery has not only great exhibitions, but it is housed in a mixed-use building full of art.

The Esker Art Gallery has not only great exhibitions, but it is housed in a mixed-use building full of art.

For those interested in local art and design cSpace is a great place to visit as it has a diversity of studios from jewelry to fashion, as well as a craft shop and the main hallway is an intimate art gallery space.

For those interested in local art and design cSpace is a great place to visit as it has a diversity of studios from jewelry to fashion, as well as a craft shop and the main hallway is an intimate art gallery space.

There are numerous murals and street art scattered throughout Calgary’s City Centre, making it an outdoor art gallery.

There are numerous murals and street art scattered throughout Calgary’s City Centre, making it an outdoor art gallery.

Free Street Markets 

During the summer Calgary offers numerous street markets from 4th Streets Lilac Festival that attracts over 100,000 people to monthly Night Markets in historic Inglewood.

If you like the thrill of the hunt while mingling with locals, the Sunday morning Hillhurst Flea Market (Hillhurst Community Centre) is your place.  In the winter, the two gyms are full of treasures; in the summer the market spills out onto the plaza.  

Crossroads Market is a year-round farmers’ market, as well as antique and boutique market, with something for everyone.   

Link: A Sunday walkabout in Hillhurst

Link: Where on Earth Did You Get That

Inglewood’s Night Market fun

Inglewood’s Night Market fun

Hillhurst Sunday Flea Market

Hillhurst Sunday Flea Market

 Live Music

Calgary is home to not one, not two but three free Saturday afternoon blues jams – Blues Can, Ironwood and Mikey’s Juke Joint.  Beer is extra.  All three venues also have Sunday jams and live music Monday to Wednesday nights with no cover charge.  Tom Phillips’ Sunday afternoon jam at Mikey’s is about as authentic as it gets for country music jam.

The Ship & Anchor is not only Calgary’s iconic pub, but it also hosts live music especially on the weekends.  In Bowness, Hexters Pub has a fun Motown Jam on Sunday afternoons that will make you want to dance. 

Link: Nashville vs. Calgary: Music Cities

LInk: Hexter Pub

Link: Blues Can

Link: Ironwood