Vancouver: The Barbershop Capital of Canada?

In every Canadian city I visit, I seem to discover it is the “capital city” of something. Halifax was the Capital City of Blade Signs. Saskatoon was the Capital City of Public Art. Lacombe: The Mural Capital of Canada.

After a month of flaneuring the streets of Vancouver I think it might be “The Barbershop Capital of Canada.”

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Barbershop are back

Yes I know barbershops are making a comeback in cities across North America, but I am thinking Vancouver is way ahead of the curve. I haven’t done exhaustive research but based on my observations and recent visits to many Canada cities I am prepared to go out on a limb and declare it the “Barbershop Capital of Canada.”

Wherever we went in Vancouver, it seemed there were barbershops on every other block, be it downtown, Main Street, Yaletown, Denman or Kits. Some we the old traditional barbers with the barber pole and others were more modern. Some had sandwich boards with fun graphics and sayings that made me smile.

Link: History of Barber Pole

In doing a bit of research, I discovered not only that barbershops are back across North America, but that landlords love them as they are not impacted by online shopping as retailers are. This didn’t surprise me as one of the things I notice in Vancouver is that a lot of their ground floor retail seems to be hair and nails salons, as well as barbershops. There was one block where I counted 6 hair salons and one nail salon in a row - the merchant at the end of the block was a a Psychic Reader. Strange but true!

Link: Barbershops Art Back

Here are some photos of the various character barbershops I discovered while flaneuring the streets of Vancouver. I have included a couple of Google Maps to illustrate just how many barbershop there are in Vancouver’s trendy areas.

I hope you will enjoy. There is even a bit of a surprise at the end.

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All of these barber shops are within a five minute walk of where we were staying at the corner of Nelson and Burrand in downtown.

All of these barber shops are within a five minute walk of where we were staying at the corner of Nelson and Burrand in downtown.

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In Kitsilano these barbershops show up on google maps.

In Kitsilano these barbershops show up on google maps.

Everyday Tourist Reader Comment: One of my patients came in with a fresh haircut, looked like he had been to someone that knew what they were doing, so I asked him where he gets his haircut. He told me about Majidian Barbers, which he travelled across the city to go to, and that he and his buddies call Oran, the barber, "Scissorhands" because he cuts like the wind and barely talks. Since I was in need of a good barber and Majidian is around the corner from our place, I gave him a go and he did not disappoint! Thought I might lose an ear but I didn't, and I came out with a great cut!  Tony

Everyday Tourist Reader Comment: One of my patients came in with a fresh haircut, looked like he had been to someone that knew what they were doing, so I asked him where he gets his haircut. He told me about Majidian Barbers, which he travelled across the city to go to, and that he and his buddies call Oran, the barber, "Scissorhands" because he cuts like the wind and barely talks. Since I was in need of a good barber and Majidian is around the corner from our place, I gave him a go and he did not disappoint! Thought I might lose an ear but I didn't, and I came out with a great cut!

Tony

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Move west in downtown nearer to Stanley Park and Coal Harbour and here are the barbershops that populate Google Maps.

Move west in downtown nearer to Stanley Park and Coal Harbour and here are the barbershops that populate Google Maps.

Last Word

Everest Barbers which was just around the corner from where we were staying at Nelson and Burrard actually offers a membership. Not just one membership, but a Gold or Silver Membership.

The Gold Membership gets you unlimited haircuts and style, unlimited beard shaping and line-up, back next shave with shaving cream, hot towel after your haircut, complimentary beverage, use of an fragrance in the cologne bar and 10% discount on all product. Cost? $93/month, $270/3 months, $522/6 months or $950/year. That is like the cost of gym membership or yoga studio!

The poster says $18.25 per haircut, which means you are getting your hair cut 5 times a month. I barely get 5 hair cuts per year. There is obviously something happening in Vancouver when it comes to men’s grooming that I haven’t experienced anywhere else.

One has to wonder if barbershops could be the future anchors of main streets? I know our little two-block 19th St NW Main Street in West Hillhurst has two barbershops.

PS

I was so impressed by Vancouver’s barbershops culture I decided to get a haircut before heading home. But rather than going to one of the professional barbershop I thought it would be interesting to get a haircut from a student at Vancouver Community College. To my surprise I was the female student’s first male haircut, but the instructor was great at supervising the cut. She did a few touch-ups and all was good.

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Vancouver: Everyday Utopia In Black & White

For many, street photography MUST be in black and white. As someone who loves colour I find it hard to see streets as black and white. I find it hard to see anything as black and white.

For me, black and white photography always makes the street look more depressing, dark and sinister than I think they really are. However, for a challenge I thought I would create a black and white photo essay of the streets of Vancouver taken over 30 days at various times of the day and night.

I will let you decide if they are just as interesting, or more interesting, than the colour street photos I have used in a previous Vancouver blog Vancouver: Street Fun For Everyone

Tourists

Tourists

Balance

Balance

Explore

Explore

1997

1997

Ponder

Ponder

Inspire

Inspire

Strong

Strong

Twisted

Twisted

Ben

Ben

Moving

Moving

Wolf

Wolf

Jack

Jack

Sketch

Sketch

Window

Window

Friend

Friend

Shadow

Shadow

Face

Face

Galmour

Galmour

Suspended

Suspended

Pair

Pair

Want

Want

Need

Need

Crash

Crash

Stoop

Stoop

School

School

Tree

Tree

Branches

Branches

Bubbles

Bubbles

Garden

Garden

Triangle

Triangle

Wall

Wall

Steps

Steps

Love

Love

Passage

Passage

Reflections

Reflections

Totems

Totems

Arching

Arching

Arch

Arch

Collage

Collage

Baby

Baby

Balcony

Balcony

Escape

Escape

Sleep

Sleep

Sidewalk

Sidewalk

Dog

Dog

Alteration

Alteration

Fantasy

Fantasy

Don’t

Don’t

Colony

Colony

Metallica

Metallica

Blanket

Blanket

Safeway

Safeway

Alley

Alley

Revolution

Revolution

Silly

Silly

Scream

Scream

XXX

XXX

Stare

Stare

Cape

Cape

Bench

Bench

Notes

Notes

Exile

Exile

Hippy

Hippy

Nod

Nod

Utopia

Utopia

Fairy Tale Postcards from University of British Columbia

One of the things we love to do when visiting any city is to flaneur the university and college campuses. Why? Because we are almost always reward with a fun experience. A recent visit to the University of British Columbia’s (UBC) campus was certainly no exception.

We found some amazing fun fairy tales books and illustrations.  

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Looking for hidden gems

While most people visiting UBC would immediately head to the world renowned Museum of Anthropology (MOA), we decided to explore the rest of campus first – Student Centre, Alumni Centre, Arts Building, Belkin Art Gallery etc.  While we didn’t find any hidden treasures, we did get a private behind the stage tour from the Marketing Director at the Wood Theatre. 

We did end up at MOA but it didn’t grab our imagination so we continued to wander the campus as it was a lovely spring afternoon for flaneuring UBC’s inviting pedestrian malls. Soon we noticed dozens of students enjoying the sun in the amphitheatre space in front of what looked like the oldest building on campus. We decided to head in that direction, thinking old buildings often have interesting things to see inside.

To our disappointment only the façade was old, the inside had been renovated and added to.  

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Had we struck out?

Then we noticed two interesting display case in the lobby with some fun historical fairy tale books, from around the world with great illustrations. Looking around we realized there were six other display cases with more historical fairy tale books. This is exactly what we were looking for – something fun, quirky and unique.       

We continued to look around and found the dramatic John Nutting glass sculpture hanging from the ceiling in the staircase, but nothing else captured our attention so we headed for the exit.  Fortunately, as we were heading out we notice a sign saying Rare Book and Special Collections Library down stairs.   

We both immediately said “Let’s check it out” as we have been rewarded in rare book collection libraries before.  Eureka…not only were nine more display cases with curated fairy tale books vignettes from the UBC’s collection, but there was also a well curated exhibition of The Chung Collection chronicling early B.C. history, immigration and settlement and its link to the Canadian Pacific Railway.  

The Rare Book and Special Collections staff Chelsea Shriver and Hiller Goodspeed were amazingly helpful, sharing with us more information about the exhibitions, the library and the fact three graduate students at the UBC iSchool (Library, Archival and Information Studies) - Renee Gaudet, Karen Ng and Ashlynn Prasad - had curated the exhibition titled “Across Enchanted Lands: Universal Motifs in Illustrated Fairy Tales.”  Kudos to them as they did a great job creating vignettes that were entertaining, engaging, educational and enlightening.    

Here are some postcards from both exhibitions, I hope will give you a sense of the incredible scope of the exhibitions and detail of the illustrations. I apologize that some of the text and photos are cropped poorly but that was to avoid the glare from the lights and glass.

Each of the display cases had a text panel and then several books relating to the theme described in the panel. The displays also included hand painted red and gold colouring with origami like flowers and figures created by Dr. Kathie Shoemaker the exhibition supervisor.

Each of the display cases had a text panel and then several books relating to the theme described in the panel. The displays also included hand painted red and gold colouring with origami like flowers and figures created by Dr. Kathie Shoemaker the exhibition supervisor.

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The Chung Collection

When Wally Chung was just six years old he spent many hours in his father’s Victoria tailor shop. One thing in particular that fascinated him was a colourful poster of the Empress of Asia, the CP ship that brought his mother to Canada in 1919. It fired the boy’s imagination and inspired hime to start collecting.

Starting with clippings for his scrapbooks, Dr. Chung spent more than 60 years assembling on the most extensive collections of its kind in North America. The Chung Collection includes more than 25,000 rare items: documents, books, maps, posters, paintings, photographs, silver, glass, ceramic ware and other artifacts related to early B.C. history, immigration and settlement and the Canadian Pacific Railway Company.

(excerpt from the exhibition brochure)

Link: Video The Chung Collection (definitely worth watching)

Link: UBC Rare Books The Chung Collection

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Everyday Tourist Travel Tips

  1. If you are in Vancouver and have time you should definitely check out the Rare Book Library’s exhibitions at UBC.  The Chung Collection will probably still be there as it is a permanent exhibition, but the fairy tales book exhibition is only on until the end of May 2019. But I am sure it will be replaced by something equally as interesting.

  2. If you are visiting a new city you should always plan to spend a day at their major university or college campus wandering the buildings, opening doors and seeing what you can find behind them.

  3. And, if you haven’t visited the university or college campus in your city for a long time (or ever) you should think of doing so as they probably have some great things to see – rare books, public art, gallery/ museum exhibitions, architecture, gardens etc. 

If you liked this blog, you will like these links:

UofC Hidden Gem: The Book Dissected

A-mazing University of New Mexico campus

University of Calgary’s public art gets no respect

University of Arizona: Resort or Research? 


Jane Jacobs' quintessential main street is located in Vancouver?

“Where is this perfect main street in Vancouver?” you ask. No it is not Robson Street. No, it is not Alberni Street. No, it is not South Granville Street. Nor, is it not Denman Street, Commercial Drive or Lonsdale Ave.

Ironically it is actually called “Main Street” and it is from East 7th Ave to 30th Ave. Yes, 23 blocks of continuous local boutiques, restaurants, cafes, grocery stores and services.

Jane Jacob’s would have loved Vancouver’s Main Street.

This is a typical block along Vancouver’s Main Street. It has just the right amount of charm and clutter, old and new, low and highbrow to create a fun walkable street that is full of useful shops that meet the everyday needs of locals.

This is a typical block along Vancouver’s Main Street. It has just the right amount of charm and clutter, old and new, low and highbrow to create a fun walkable street that is full of useful shops that meet the everyday needs of locals.

No Gentrification

There are few national chains, mostly “mom and pop” shops, which is exactly what Jacobs thought made for a great Main Street.

There are lots of doors on the street and windows to look at. There are thrift stores and used bookstores, mixed in with funky restaurants and small grocery stores. There is even a garage that still repair cars and a car dealership.

It has all of ingredients of a good Main Street that Jacob’s wrote about in her 1960s book “The Death and Live of Great American Cities.”

It is a nice mix of shops, cafes, restaurants and services - something for everyone! There are just a few new condos and nothing over four stories.

The side streets have a diversity of single family homes that still look like the original homes, with a few new infills and some renovations, but nothing as extensive as Calgary’s inner city communities where there are new infills on every block.

FYI: We didn’t see a lot of “For Lease” signs along Main Street, which is surely a healthy sign. And Kevin Kent of Knifewear tells me that he pays higher rent for his store in Vancouver, than for his stores in Calgary (Inglewood), Ottawa (Glebe) and Edmonton (Whyte Avenue). So the success of the street isn’t lower rents that makes it so attractive to local businesses.

There are no fancy designer buildings, no special signage or ornamentation, just back-to-back pedestrian oriented shops.

There are no fancy designer buildings, no special signage or ornamentation, just back-to-back pedestrian oriented shops.

One of the few blocks with residential above the shops.

One of the few blocks with residential above the shops.

A typical side street is populated with single family homes, there are no low, mid or high rise buildings.

A typical side street is populated with single family homes, there are no low, mid or high rise buildings.

Postcards From Main Street

Every good Main Street has to have a diner.

Every good Main Street has to have a diner.

Independent cafes like The Liberty Bakery and Cafe at E 21st Street are scattered all along Main Street. In fact there are three cafe’s on this corner alone.

Independent cafes like The Liberty Bakery and Cafe at E 21st Street are scattered all along Main Street. In fact there are three cafe’s on this corner alone.

There are several used bookstores like this one. No I didn’t get lucky at this bookstore but I did the next day at Paper Hound Bookshop the next day - a signed copy of Jane Jacobs’ “Systems of Survival.”

There are several used bookstores like this one. No I didn’t get lucky at this bookstore but I did the next day at Paper Hound Bookshop the next day - a signed copy of Jane Jacobs’ “Systems of Survival.”

There are lots of good food places…

There are lots of good food places…

Main Street is home to a couple of neon signs like this one….a reminder of how the street has evolved with the times.

Main Street is home to a couple of neon signs like this one….a reminder of how the street has evolved with the times.

Their old post office has been converted into a special event space.

Their old post office has been converted into a special event space.

I counted 40+ typewriters at The Regional Assembly of Text stationary and card shop. They actually have a free night when they let people use the typewriters to create their own prose. I have added it to my calendar.

I counted 40+ typewriters at The Regional Assembly of Text stationary and card shop. They actually have a free night when they let people use the typewriters to create their own prose. I have added it to my calendar.

Yes it has the organic grocer offering Kombucha “that is not as expensive as you think,” but there are several older grocery stores that look like they have been there since the ‘60s.

Yes it has the organic grocer offering Kombucha “that is not as expensive as you think,” but there are several older grocery stores that look like they have been there since the ‘60s.

Sing Sing Beer Bar is a great spot for people watching and catching some afternoon rays…we certainly enjoyed their Happy Hour!

Sing Sing Beer Bar is a great spot for people watching and catching some afternoon rays…we certainly enjoyed their Happy Hour!

I included myself in this photo so you could appreciate how big this sock monkey aka Easter Bunny is. I love streets with quirky window displays.

I included myself in this photo so you could appreciate how big this sock monkey aka Easter Bunny is. I love streets with quirky window displays.

The Granville Island Toy Company opened a second location on Main Street in 2007.

The Granville Island Toy Company opened a second location on Main Street in 2007.

I am a sucker for shops with great blade signs.

I am a sucker for shops with great blade signs.

There are some great “window licking” photography opportunities along Main Street. A sure sign of a pedestrian friendly street.

There are some great “window licking” photography opportunities along Main Street. A sure sign of a pedestrian friendly street.

The Soap Dispensary and Kitchen Staples offers a wide array of natural products. No those are not beer taps.

The Soap Dispensary and Kitchen Staples offers a wide array of natural products. No those are not beer taps.

Even Calgary’s Kevin Kent chose Main Street for his Vancouver Knifewear store.

Even Calgary’s Kevin Kent chose Main Street for his Vancouver Knifewear store.

There are some great shop and restaurant names like this one and The Shameful Tiki Room.

There are some great shop and restaurant names like this one and The Shameful Tiki Room.

Marian Distribution Centre is a real throw back, with its selection of spiritual books and artifacts.

Marian Distribution Centre is a real throw back, with its selection of spiritual books and artifacts.

Main Street has a few antique stores, as well as a couple of thrift stores for those treasure hunters.

Main Street has a few antique stores, as well as a couple of thrift stores for those treasure hunters.

I love the simplicity of just closing off half a block of this side street to create a community gathering place. It is also a simple and effective way to prevent traffic from cutting through the neighbourhood.

I love the simplicity of just closing off half a block of this side street to create a community gathering place. It is also a simple and effective way to prevent traffic from cutting through the neighbourhood.

This is the only other evidence of modernization of the street with a small pocket park and a strange red metal sculpture passageway that seems so popular these days. There are no special pedestrian crossing, no bump outs so drivers can see people trying to cross the road and no bike lanes. Everyone just seems to use common sense to make it work.

This is the only other evidence of modernization of the street with a small pocket park and a strange red metal sculpture passageway that seems so popular these days. There are no special pedestrian crossing, no bump outs so drivers can see people trying to cross the road and no bike lanes. Everyone just seems to use common sense to make it work.

Yes there is even an Exile on Main Street in Vancouver….

Yes there is even an Exile on Main Street in Vancouver….

This photo says it all…

This photo says it all…

Last Word

You will notice there are no fancy sidewalks. No designer furniture. Yes there are some banners, but for the most part the street and buildings have been left to age gracefully. There is something authentic about the street. It is not contrived as so many urban streets are today - trying to hard to be pedestrian friendly. One could ask can good Main Streets be planned or do they have to grow organically.

It has the right combination of old, middle-aged and new buildings and diversity of shops catering mostly to locals, with some destination shops thrown in for good measure.

I think Jane Jacobs' would have loved Vancouver’s Main Street. It is hard to believe there are still streets like this in Vancouver, where everything is being gentrified.

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Calgary: 24 Main Streets Coming Soon?

Halifax: The blade sign capital of Canada

Window Licking in Portlandia



Vancouver: Street Fun For Everyone

Did you know that back in th ‘90s the City of Vancouver actually created a Fun Coordinator position, because of criticism that the city was no fun? True story. I don’t believe the position still exists.

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From Humdrum to Fun

When I walk the street of cities I love to take photos of the fun things I see - things that make be smile and laugh. Quirky and funky things! Vancouver has not disappointed me.

Here are just a few examples of the fun photos that I have taken while flaneuring the streets of Vancouver over the past week.

Be sure to read to the end. The last example perhaps best illustrates how Vancouver has evolved from a humdrum city to a fun metropolis over the past 20+ years.

Vancouver’s luxury fashion retailers have great window designers. I wish more retailers would invest in creating fun windows that make you stop and look.

Vancouver’s luxury fashion retailers have great window designers. I wish more retailers would invest in creating fun windows that make you stop and look.

If cities are going to commission public art to enhance the pedestrian experience, be sure that it is fun and accessible to the pedestrians, like this Joe Fafard piece.

If cities are going to commission public art to enhance the pedestrian experience, be sure that it is fun and accessible to the pedestrians, like this Joe Fafard piece.

This installation by artist Yue Minjun next to the pathway at English Bay titled “A-maze-ing Laughter,” brings a smile to people of all ages. It never fails!

This installation by artist Yue Minjun next to the pathway at English Bay titled “A-maze-ing Laughter,” brings a smile to people of all ages. It never fails!

Even the Vancouver Art Gallery has some fun art on their roof. There are four ships, one white, one black, one red and one yellow. I just thought they were fun, but turns out they are a very serious art installation by Ken Lum. The First Nations boat is red, the Fujian ghost ship is yellow, the Komagata Maru is black and Captain Vancouver’s ship is white. The boats point north, south, east and west as a directional compass, asking viewers to situate themselves within a larger geography. You could easily miss them…I have for years…

Even the Vancouver Art Gallery has some fun art on their roof. There are four ships, one white, one black, one red and one yellow. I just thought they were fun, but turns out they are a very serious art installation by Ken Lum. The First Nations boat is red, the Fujian ghost ship is yellow, the Komagata Maru is black and Captain Vancouver’s ship is white. The boats point north, south, east and west as a directional compass, asking viewers to situate themselves within a larger geography. You could easily miss them…I have for years…

This playful window changes every few seconds, creating a fun pop art exhibition as you walk by.

This playful window changes every few seconds, creating a fun pop art exhibition as you walk by.

I am not sure anyone is ever happy about having to do laundry, however I love shops with fun names.

I am not sure anyone is ever happy about having to do laundry, however I love shops with fun names.

Found this fun scarecrow and two others while cycling on the Arbutus Greenway. We need more scarecrows.

Found this fun scarecrow and two others while cycling on the Arbutus Greenway. We need more scarecrows.

Found this fun, tiny house/truck on East Hastings…

Found this fun, tiny house/truck on East Hastings…

These pink bike racks along Davie Street are too much fun.

These pink bike racks along Davie Street are too much fun.

While most of the umbrellas in Vancouver are black and boring, this one made me smile.

While most of the umbrellas in Vancouver are black and boring, this one made me smile.

Even TransLink joins in the fun with this snowman icon warning people to be careful on the stairs at the stations.  Seem strange that Vancouver would use a snowman - ironic humour?

Even TransLink joins in the fun with this snowman icon warning people to be careful on the stairs at the stations. Seem strange that Vancouver would use a snowman - ironic humour?

Discovered this fun building while on the bus on East Hastings…how clever. More of this please….

Discovered this fun building while on the bus on East Hastings…how clever. More of this please….

Even the buses in Vancouver are fun.

Even the buses in Vancouver are fun.

Was surprise to find an indoor basketball court as part of the redevelopment of the block with the old Woodward Department Store. These guys were having a fun pick-up game.

Was surprise to find an indoor basketball court as part of the redevelopment of the block with the old Woodward Department Store. These guys were having a fun pick-up game.

Vancouver is a great place for night walks. Found this fun urban design that I would probably have missed during the day.

Vancouver is a great place for night walks. Found this fun urban design that I would probably have missed during the day.

This VanCity bank window made me smile…

This VanCity bank window made me smile…

Sandwich boards can add some fun to the pedestrian experience.

Sandwich boards can add some fun to the pedestrian experience.

This fairy garden in the West End created from kids toy figures was delightful. I am thinking I have to create a fairy garden this spring to entertain the children being dropped off in front of our house for the Honey Bee Daycare across the street. I must practice what I preach.

This fairy garden in the West End created from kids toy figures was delightful. I am thinking I have to create a fairy garden this spring to entertain the children being dropped off in front of our house for the Honey Bee Daycare across the street. I must practice what I preach.

Keep your eyes on the ground and you will be rewarded with these fun mosaics at the corners in downtown.

Keep your eyes on the ground and you will be rewarded with these fun mosaics at the corners in downtown.

Even Vancouver’s homeless have a sense of humour. This person wrote 10+ different positive statements in colourful chalk on a street corner on Robson Street and then asked for donations. Gotta give him A for effort and A for creativity.

Even Vancouver’s homeless have a sense of humour. This person wrote 10+ different positive statements in colourful chalk on a street corner on Robson Street and then asked for donations. Gotta give him A for effort and A for creativity.

Forget the Baskets, Banners, Furniture & Art

While many cities spend big bucks trying to spruce up their shopping streets with banners, baskets of flowers, street furniture and public art to make them more pedestrian friendly, I think they would be far better off if the merchants took ownership for creating a great pedestrian experience by improving window displays and putting things out on the street. In addition, building owners could painted blank walls with murals or enhance their building’s facade with some fun colour.

Perhaps cities could give building and shop owners a tax break for their efforts as an incentive to create a fun pedestrian experience. Just an idea…

Not far away from Happy Laundry in Vancouver’s East Village (2230 East Hastings) you will find Dayton Shoe Factory that has been there since 1949. Originally established to make boots for loggers, today they fun custom boots for anyone. But that is not the real fun. If you look in the background you will see two beer taps. No they aren’t just for decoration or for special events. Anybody who comes in to look around can enjoy Dayton Shoe Factory’s own craft beer. Now how fun is that….

Not far away from Happy Laundry in Vancouver’s East Village (2230 East Hastings) you will find Dayton Shoe Factory that has been there since 1949. Originally established to make boots for loggers, today they fun custom boots for anyone. But that is not the real fun. If you look in the background you will see two beer taps. No they aren’t just for decoration or for special events. Anybody who comes in to look around can enjoy Dayton Shoe Factory’s own craft beer. Now how fun is that….

Beltline Embraces Density 

Calgary’s Beltline has been growing in leaps and bounds since the community took the rather unusual step to develop its own vision document, “Blueprint for the Beltline” in 2003.

The vision - to create a vibrant community of 40,000 people by 2035. 

Qualex-Landmark have completed six condo towers in the Beltline since 2006, with a total of 1,300 new homes.

Qualex-Landmark have completed six condo towers in the Beltline since 2006, with a total of 1,300 new homes.

Cove Properties built these four condo towers near the Stampede LRT Station in the early ‘00s in the east end of the Beltline aka Victoria Park.

Cove Properties built these four condo towers near the Stampede LRT Station in the early ‘00s in the east end of the Beltline aka Victoria Park.

Blueprint for success

Yes, the community produced its own vision, at its own cost and then presented it to the City.  And, while the “Blueprint for the Beltline” had no official status with the City, it served as the catalyst to get the City to approve a new Beltline Area Redevelopment Plan in 2006. Ultimately, it resulted in the amalgamation of Connaught and Victoria Park, two of Calgary’s oldest communities with a population base of 17,500.  

While the Blueprint identified the need for more amenities like green spaces, public realm improvements and character districts, it also embraced the idea that the community needed more density.  

Yes, you read right. They wanted more high-rises and mid-rises as a means of creating a vibrant community with lots of urban amenities - grocery stores, shops, pubs, clubs, lounges, galleries, festivals, bike lanes and great streets. 

So, while other communities protest new residential towers in their community, Beltliners have been embracing them for over a decade.  

The new Canadian Tire and Urban Fare stores on the Beltline’s 8th St promenade adds to the many new urban living amenities added to the community over the past 10+ years.

The new Canadian Tire and Urban Fare stores on the Beltline’s 8th St promenade adds to the many new urban living amenities added to the community over the past 10+ years.

17th Avenue is the Beltline’s Main Street.

17th Avenue is the Beltline’s Main Street.

Beltline is a walkable community….

Beltline is a walkable community….

Blueprint for success

Indeed, the Beltline’s evolution as Calgary’s premier urban neighbourhood has been outstanding.  It was Avenue Magazine’s Best Neighbourhood in 2015, 2016 and 2018 (slipping into second place in 2017). Last year, it was also Calgary’s fastest growing community with a population increase of 1,668, just edging out Saddleridge’s 1,656 newcomers.

This is definitely not a one year blip given the Beltline’s population has steadily increased by a healthy 3,530 since 2014 to 24,887.

Community events and festivals like the annual curling bonspiel make the Beltline a fun place to live.

Community events and festivals like the annual curling bonspiel make the Beltline a fun place to live.

Decorating party for Pride Parade float at the Beltline’s Aquatic & Fitness Centre

Decorating party for Pride Parade float at the Beltline’s Aquatic & Fitness Centre

Beltline Urban Mural Program party celebrated the addition of several new murals last summer.

Beltline Urban Mural Program party celebrated the addition of several new murals last summer.

Beautifying the Beltline

And yes, with the increased density has come a variety of improvements – including the new Barb Scott Park and Thomson Family, a lovely renovation to Memorial Park, a dedicated bike lane along 12thAve SW, infrastructure and sidewalk improvements to 17thAvenue SW and the 13thAvenue Greenway. As well, over the past two summers, the Beltline has been transformed into an intriguing outdoor art gallery with 11 major murals.  

Link: Beltline Urban Mural Project

In addition, all of the underpasses linking the Beltline with downtown are getting mega makeovers to make them more pedestrian-friendly, benefitting the many Beltliners who work downtown.  To date, the 8th and 2nd St SW and 4th St SE underpasses have been completed. 

8th Street SW underpass today

8th Street SW underpass today

8th Street Underpass before

8th Street Underpass before


Condo vs Rental 

In the early years of the Beltline renaissance, almost all of the new residential development were condominiums, of which some units were rentals.  However, over the past few years, most of the residential development has been purpose-built rental towers.  

And there are good reasons for the rise in rentals. 

Probably the major reason is that 74% of Calgary’s rental properties are pre 1979, meaning they lack the amenities today’s urban dwellers, be that an empty nester or young professional, are looking for. Things like an ensuite bathroom, larger closets, washer and dryer in the unit, high ceilings and an open concept layout.   Also, the new rental towers offer other desirable amenities like rooftop patios, BBQs and fire pits, games rooms, demonstration kitchens and even dog runs.

There are currently seven new purpose-built Beltline residential towers at various stages of development, representing about 1,500 new homes coming on stream over the next few years.

I toured the recently completed SODO tower (10thAve just west of 5th Street SW) and it is more like a hotel than an apartment.  Next up is One, Strategic Group’s 37-storey One tower with 379 new homes (201 - 10th Ave SE) including two luxury penthouse suites.  Also, under construction is phase one of Hines’ 500 Block two tower project (461 homes) at the corner of 4th St and 12th Ave SW and The Underwood, 192 homes at 202 - 14th Ave SW. 

Strategic Group is also finishing up the conversion of an older 7-storey office building across from the Midtown Co-op into a 65 funky residences, with rooftop amenities.  

All of these new purpose-built rental buildings are designed to meet the growing demand for urban rentals in Calgary’s fastest growing community.  

In addition, there are seven new condo towers, representing about 1,000 new homes, at various stages of development. This includes the recently completed Park Point, by Qualex Landmark (which has a second tower in the works) and the soon-to-be-occupied The Royal by Bosa Developments which includes a Canadian Tire urban format store and Urban Fare (opening soon).  The “new kid” under construction is Intergulf’s 11th+ 11thproject which, at 44-storeys will be the tallest building in the Beltline. 

Hine’s 500 Block residential development (the white ghost building is a second tower) in the middle of the Beltline is under construction.

Hine’s 500 Block residential development (the white ghost building is a second tower) in the middle of the Beltline is under construction.

InterGulf’s 11th and 11th residential tower on the west side of the Beltline is also under construction.

InterGulf’s 11th and 11th residential tower on the west side of the Beltline is also under construction.

Strategic Group’s One residential tower on the east side of the Beltline is under construction.

Strategic Group’s One residential tower on the east side of the Beltline is under construction.

Last Word 

The addition of purpose-built rental towers in the Beltline should be good news for condo developers and owners, as today’s renter is probably tomorrow’s buyer.  In fact, the Canadian Home Builder’s Association’s Earncliffe National Poll documented that 79% of Canadian renters would like to own their own home (April 2018).  And, BILD Calgary Region’s survey (June 2018) found 75% of Calgarians think owning a home provides greater financial security.  

Great communities provide a diversity of housing options (rental and ownership) for people of all ages and backgrounds. It would remiss not to acknowledge the Beltline’s vision as Calgary’s premier urban community includes its fair share of social housing and services including the expansion of the Mustard Seed, the Sheldon Chumir Health Centre and the relocation of CUPS to the Beltline. 

The addition of 2,500 new homes (for about 4,000 new residents) over the next few years will keep the Beltline on track to achieving its path to a population of 40,000 by 2035.

Note: This blog was published in the Calgary Herald’s New Condos feature on March 9th, 2019.

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Beltline: Calgary’s Hipster/Nester Community

BUMP: Beltline Urban Murals Project

Beautifying the Beltline




Everyday Street Windows Talking

One of the highlights of February in Calgary is the annual Exposure Festival which showcases the diversity of photography being done in Calgary and beyond with 38 exhibitions across the city.

As most of you know in a previous life I was a bit of a painter and then a curator at a public art gallery and I consider the photography in my blogs as important as the words. In honour of this year’s Exposure Festival I thought I would self-curate a photo essay of windows with words from various cities and towns I have flaneured.

It is as if each of the windows is talking to those who pass by. I hope you enjoy….

Link: Exposure Festival 2019

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Street Talk

After I selected these photos and loaded them to the blog site, I began to wonder if they should be organized in some way. Then it occurred to me that perhaps collectively the words might create a poem or some sort of BEAT story.

I left them as they were and here is the story they tell:

Rise and shine,

WROX

beauti-tone experts

Let your walking do the talking

Live work play

wearing 50 hats

in the cycle district

meet me at the bar

sweat every day

I’m outdoorsy

I drink my wine on a patio

Forget the rules

Lady Luck

If you like it, wear it,

Synonym

heaven’s boutique

Crumbs Cakery and Cafe

eat good…

Three Sister’s Day Spa

Social Room

Embrace the outdoors

Live near the ocean

love of beauty is taste

creation of beauty is art

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Exposure 2018: Double Exposure

Downtown Calgary: Black & White / Inside & Out

Condo Living: No Parking, No Problem

Could you live in Calgary without a car? I am not sure I could, but more and more Calgarians are doing so. With the introduction of Car2Go (Calgary has one of the highest number of Car2Go members in North America), Uber and Lime (bikes), the need for a car in Calgary is becoming less and less mandatory, if you live in the City Centre.  

Astute condo developers are noticing there is a niche market for condos with little or no parking.  

The Hat@7th has no parking, but the LRT is right outside your door, literally.

The Hat@7th has no parking, but the LRT is right outside your door, literally.

N3 Success

First it was the N3 condo in East Village, a 15-story tower with 167 units and no parking, by Knightsbridge Homes and Metropia that was completed in 2017. One of the big advantages of no parking is these units sell for about $50,000 less than competitors’ condos (i.e. the cost to build an underground park space - give or take $10,000.)  The idea of building a new condo with no parking was bold - it hadn’t happened in Vancouver or Toronto.

N3 captured the attention of urban planners across North America.  Would automobile-obsessed Calgarians really buy a condo with no parking?  The answer is Yes.

As Joe Starkman, President of Knightsbridge Homes said to me “I did my research and I was willing to gamble there were at least 167 Calgarians who wanted to live downtown and didn’t need a car. I was willing to take that risk.” 

But was N3 a unique situation, given it is so close to downtown, so close to LRT and plans were in place for a major retail centre (with grocery store and other everyday amenities) nearby?  

N3 condo in Calgary’s East Village is within easy walking distance to new Central library, LRT station, Olympic Plaza Cultural District, Stampede Park, Stephen Avenue shopping and restaurants and the Bow River pathway. A new retail complex is currently under construction nearby that will have a major grocery store.

N3 condo in Calgary’s East Village is within easy walking distance to new Central library, LRT station, Olympic Plaza Cultural District, Stampede Park, Stephen Avenue shopping and restaurants and the Bow River pathway. A new retail complex is currently under construction nearby that will have a major grocery store.

We are about to find out!

Bowman Development has announced The Nest in Mission, with 82 condos starting in the low $200’s.  Located at the corner of 18thAve and Macleod Trail SE, its residents will be within easy walking distance to the Erlton and Stampede LRT Stations, Stampede Park and Mission Safeway and other shops.  No need for an in-house workout room with the iconic Repsol Sport Centre literally a hop, skip and jump away.  You are also right on the Elbow River pathway system.  The units are small (415 to 556 square feet), but for true urbanites the community is their living room, dining room and kitchen.  At 15-storeys, many residents will have great views of downtown, the mountains and the Stampede fireworks.   

Over in Downtown West, Cidex is building the Hat @7th a 66-unit apartment building at 1116 7th Ave SW that’s expected to be completed in 2019. It too has no parking, however given its so close to the 11th Street LRT station and not far from the 8th Street station, who needs a car?  Living here gives you easy access to Bow River Promenade and walking to Kensington or West Beltline with their grocery stores and shops.  You can also play basketball or volleyball, or practise your skateboarding and BMX skills at Shaw Millennium Park. 

Bonus. Cidex’s West Village towers is also under construction just a few blocks away, with its 90,000 square feet of retail at the base - plenty of room for an urban grocery store and other shops to meet your everyday needs.  

Battistella designed it new Nude condo in the west Beltline with parking spots for only 60% of the units, thinking not everyone will want a parking spot.  So far, 85% of buyers have chosen to purchase a parking spot with their condo.  

Obviously, the early bird get the parking spot!

The Nest located on the Elbow River near Lindsay Park, Stampede Park and the Repsol Sports Centre will have less than 10 parking spots.

The Nest located on the Elbow River near Lindsay Park, Stampede Park and the Repsol Sports Centre will have less than 10 parking spots.

Nude (tallest building) will also have limited parking, but who cares when most of your everyday needs are within walking distance.

Nude (tallest building) will also have limited parking, but who cares when most of your everyday needs are within walking distance.

Last Word

More and more cities across North America are looking at allowing residential developers to build new condos without any parking or much less parking than would have been demanded in the past.  Calgary is leading the way, partly because it has one of the most walkable city centres in North America, perhaps the world.

Link: Caglary: The world’s most walkable city centre?

In the past, cities demanded developers include a minimum of one (and sometimes more) parking stalls per unit, as well as visitor parking, as neighbors didn’t want the newbies to take their street parking.  

But this is quickly changing, with Calgary ahead of the curve.

Note: An edited version of this blog was commissioned for the January 2019 edition of Condo Living magazine.

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

N3: No parking, No cars, No worries!

Hey Calgarians! You don’t own the parking in front of your house!

Downtown Calgary puts the PARK in PARKades

Billion Dollar Question: Is Calgary the recreational capital of Canada?

The City of Calgary has invested almost a half a billion dollars (that’s $500,000,000) over the past three years in four major new recreation centres – Brookfield Residential YMCA at Seton (largest YMCA in the world), Shane Homes YMCA at Rocky Ridge (second largest YMCA in the world), Remington YMCA in Quarry Park and Great Plains Recreation Facility (eastern edge of the city).  

Given this huge investment, one could ask, “Is Calgary the recreational capital of Canada?”

However, the recreational capital isn’t necessarily the one with the biggest recreational facilities, it could have good facilities overall, with few strengths and no major weaknesses.  Or it could be the city with the best recreational programs with the most participation.  

Not only is Calgary’s new Rocky Ridge YMCA is the second largest in North America, but it is also a bold architectural statement for those living in new communities on the northwest edge of the City.

Not only is Calgary’s new Rocky Ridge YMCA is the second largest in North America, but it is also a bold architectural statement for those living in new communities on the northwest edge of the City.

Calgary has been building iconic recreation centres since the early ‘80s. This is the Repsol Sports Centre built in 1983 for the Western Canada Summer Games.

Calgary has been building iconic recreation centres since the early ‘80s. This is the Repsol Sports Centre built in 1983 for the Western Canada Summer Games.

Calgary’s 131 km Rotary Mattamy Greenway is a unique recreational experience.

Calgary’s 131 km Rotary Mattamy Greenway is a unique recreational experience.

And what do we mean by recreation? 

Judy Birdsell, one of the founders of IMAGINE Citizens Collaborating for Health, reminded me that the definition of recreation is “any activity done for enjoyment when one is not working.”  She thinks we shouldn’t equate recreation with sports and fitness, but include everything from dancing to gardening, from quilting to reading.” Hmmm, perhaps it should also include flaneuring and dog walking too?

Calgary shines when it comes to community gardens, not sure about gardening, dance or quilting.  We had 169 community gardens as of July 2016, (Calgary Horticultural Society website); Edmonton had 80 as of July 2018 and City of Vancouver (not metro Vancouver) 110. 

Calgary has 150 public off-leash areas in our multi-use parks for Calgarians and their dogs to enjoy. In fact, “Calgary may have the largest number of off-leash areas and combined amount of off-leash space (more than 1,250 hectares) in North America,” says the City of Calgary website. Perhaps this is not surprising as Calgary has the highest per capita dog ownership in Canada with 1 dog for every 12 people, just ahead of Winnipeg and Edmonton (CTV New Winnipeg, March 29, 2017). 

The City of Calgary website also says we have “the most extensive urban pathways and bikeway network in North America.” Mary Kapusta, Director, Communications at the Calgary Public Library says the number of visitors to our 20 libraries is one also one of the highest in North America with 6.8 million visits, 688,000 active members, 14.6 million items in annually. That’s a whopping 14 books per person per year.

If we add in the cost of the new Central Library and National Music Centre (Birdsell says it is growing international trend for physicians to prescribe social or recreational activities to help patients with certain illnesses) to the $500,000,000 investment in mega recreation centres, we are almost a BILLION dollars (not all City of Caglary dollars).

Just sitting and watching the Bow River flow could be considered a recreational activity by some.

Just sitting and watching the Bow River flow could be considered a recreational activity by some.

Calgary is his home to one of the world’s largest public skate parks.

Calgary is his home to one of the world’s largest public skate parks.

Strolling Stephen Avenue Walk at lunch hour is a recreational activity for many.

Strolling Stephen Avenue Walk at lunch hour is a recreational activity for many.

Stopping to make a snowman just because you the mood strikes you as this couple did is also a recreational activity.

Stopping to make a snowman just because you the mood strikes you as this couple did is also a recreational activity.

Or chilling at a music festival is a recreational for some.

Or chilling at a music festival is a recreational for some.

Or it could be puttering in your backyard garden.

Or it could be puttering in your backyard garden.

Is bigger better? 

This then opens the door to question, “Should we be building mega multi-million dollar regional multi-use recreation complexes, or should the focus be on local facilities and programs that foster everyday activities and socialization with one’s immediate neighbours?”  

Cynthia Watson, Chief Evolution Officer at Vivo (formerly Cardel Place) notes her facility is a “gathering place for the community.  We are the afterschool place, the youth space, the older adult social connector, the health services touchpoint, the social entrepreneur incubator, the healthy living collaborator...oh and yes - we do have swimming lessons and fitness classes too!” home to a diversity of community, cultural, sport, faith-based, education and recreation groups.  

She adds, “Vivo is home to several older adult groups like SPRY in the Hills. It is a Girl Guide clubhouse, a Spirit of Math classroom and the Dawat E-Islamic Centre Calgary’s Friday afternoon prayer group worship space. And we are a meeting space for Northern Hills Connect a group of 25+ social entrepreneurs.”  

She notes “you get better economies of scale and operating efficiencies when you combine multiple uses in one facilities vs scattering several single-use facilities in different communities.  Larger facilities are also more cost effective from a staffing perspective.” 

Multi-use facilities are also more convenient for parents when little Johnny has a hockey game, older sister Sally can go to the library and Mom can have a coffee klatch with other parents or perhaps even do her own workout.  Watson thinks “the City did a good job when they started to combine traditional recreation centres with libraries and other activities.”  

Vivo’s catchment started with 75,000 people in 2004 and has grown to well over 145,000 today. It includes established communities like Northern Hills, Sandstone MacEwan, Beddington, Huntington Hills, Hidden Valley, growing communities like Evanston, Kincora, Sage Hill and new communities like Livingston and Carrington. 

Today it has approximately 1.3 million visitors a year, with plans in place for an $60 million 85,000 square foot addition due to the popularity of its facilities and programs. The expansion will include an indoor park that can be used in the winter by seniors who just want to walk without fear of falling on the ice, while young families can enjoy the playground as they do in the summer. The park will also accommodate festivals and events like movie-in-the-park in the winter adding another dimension to the community’s socialization.   

Watson said users are telling them “they want more flexible, social gathering places where they can come and go base on their own schedule.  Places where they can just hang out or do things in a less structured way.” 

When I chatted with Glenda Marr, Business Development Manager for the Genesis Center in the northeast, the story was the same – programs are popular, operating at capacity and looking at expansion.  In fact, many of Calgary’s older regional recreation centres as so popular they are operating at or near capacity and have plans for expansion. 

Large facilities like the Genesis Field House not only host sporting event, but events like the annual mega Train Show that takes over the entire facility.

Large facilities like the Genesis Field House not only host sporting event, but events like the annual mega Train Show that takes over the entire facility.

VIVO expansion plans include an indoor park with playground and field for casual play and relaxation by all ages.

VIVO expansion plans include an indoor park with playground and field for casual play and relaxation by all ages.

Recreation can be meeting a friend for coffee.

Recreation can be meeting a friend for coffee.

So, what does the City of Calgary think?

In discussion with James McLaughlin, Acting Director of Calgary Recreation, I was surprised to learn “there is currently no standard benchmarking in Canada regarding the recommended amount of recreation facilities per capita.” I was hoping there would be some definitive measurements like number of hockey rinks, swimming pools or sports fields or total square feet of recreational facilities per 100,000 people.  

I was also told any comparison gets complicated by the fact no city has a comprehensive collection of all the private, city and community facilities and their program participation.  

I did learn Calgary has developed a unique partnership model where the City of Calgary builds these new regional recreation centers, but they are operated by others like regional community associations or the YMCA.  Speaking of the YMCA, perhaps one of the most innovative recreational partnerships in Canada is at the South Health Campus (hospital) which also includes a YMCA.    

McLaughlin shared with me that 93% of Calgarians are satisfied with the City’s recreation programs and 92% are satisfied with our recreation facilities based on The City of Calgary’s 2018 Citizen Satisfaction Survey.  That’s impressive, almost hard to believe. 

This surprised me as I have heard from numerous parents and grandparents, of how poor our playing fields can be in the summer with dandelion infestation that makes the fields slippery and dangerous.  Others have said the grass is sometimes so long when the younger kids kick the ball it hardly moves.  I have also heard the cost of ice time in Calgary is significantly higher than in other cities because of a lack of rinks.  And yet others have told me that when they go to other cities for soccer, hockey and ringette tournaments, they are often surprised at how much better their facilities are than Calgary’s. The high satisfaction rating is also surprising given over the past year two City recreational centres have been closed due to roof issues.  

 McLaughlin shared “comparing recreational participation levels from city to city is difficult due to different demographics Calgary being a younger city you might expect its citizens to be more active.  However, Vancouver and Victoria have more retirees who often have more time to be active than parents working and raising a family.  It gets complicated.” 

Perhaps the most enlightening learning from McLaughlin was that recreation leaders in Calgary and other cities are moving away from focusing on sports and fitness and towards a more active living wellness model.   

Guess, Birdsell was correct and Watson and her colleagues are on the leading edge.  

Calgary also boast numerous private recreation facilities like the massive new Rocky Mountain Climbing centre just west of Canada Olympic Park. It is one of three Rocky Mountain Climbing centres in Calgary.

Calgary also boast numerous private recreation facilities like the massive new Rocky Mountain Climbing centre just west of Canada Olympic Park. It is one of three Rocky Mountain Climbing centres in Calgary.

Recreation can also include an afternoon of painting in the park.

Recreation can also include an afternoon of painting in the park.

Learning to fish is another recreational activity.

Learning to fish is another recreational activity.

Calgary has 22 city-maintained toboggan hills with many more community hills like this one in Bridgeland Riverside.

Calgary has 22 city-maintained toboggan hills with many more community hills like this one in Bridgeland Riverside.

ParticipACTION

So, being the recreational capital of Canada shouldn’t just be about the quality and quantity of facilities, it should also be about citizen participation in everyday activities.  So, are Calgarians the most active Canadians?  

Remember the federal government’s ParticipACTION (launched in 1971 ceased in 2001 and relaunched in 2017) whose shaming message was “the average Canadian adult was like a 60-year Swede old when it came to physical fitness?”  Its goal was to get Canadians off the couch and do something, even if just for 20 minutes.  While there is lots of information on how successful ParticiACTION was as an awareness program, it is less clear if adult Canadians are gaining on the 60-year old Swedes.  

According to data from the Canadian Community Health Survey,  26.7 per cent of Canadians were obese in 2015, up from 23.1 per cent in 2004 - not a good sign.  Another study published in the scientific journal Nature in 2017, documented that Canada ranks third from the bottom in how much we walk per day by a group of researchers who looked at smartphone data to see how much walking people do in 111 countries and tracked their steps over an average of 95 days.

Link:  Nature Worldwide physical activity data

 Stats Canada last documented the prevalence of obesity in major Canadian cities in 2012 and Calgary at 22.1% was higher than Toronto (20.2%), Victoria (19.6%), Vancouver (17.4%) and Kelowna’s was the lowest at 17.0%. But this doesn’t say how active the rest of us are. 

According to The Conference Board of Canada’s 2016 City Health Ranking, which looked at such aspects as life satisfaction, healthy lifestyles and access to health care, Saskatoon came out on top as Canada’s healthiest city, with Calgary second.  

 An Expedia blog in 2018 attempted to rank Canada’s most active cities based on average number of marathons and hiking trails, access to bike paths, trails and races, per capita and abundance of outdoor activities such as kayaking, canoeing.  Calgary came in 4thbeat out by Whistler #3, Golden #2 and Vancouver #1. 

Link: Active Cities In Canada Ranked

As stated earlier, the City of Calgary doesn’t have comprehensive stats that would include both visits to City, private and community traditional recreation facilities, as well as other non-work pursuits. However, most of Calgary’s 26 major recreation centers are operating at or near capacity for most of the year with several having plans for expansion – suggesting Calgarians are indeed very active.

So, while Calgary is not at the top of every health and wellness ranking, it is near the top so it could be in the running for being the “recreational capital of Canada.”

Let’s dig deeper! 

It is impossible to track all of the neighbourhood events in Calgary or any other city for that matter.

It is impossible to track all of the neighbourhood events in Calgary or any other city for that matter.

For some people surfing the Bow River Wave is recreational.

For some people surfing the Bow River Wave is recreational.

This family is off to the Riley Park wading pool.

This family is off to the Riley Park wading pool.

Who ever heard of a dog park in the ‘70s?  

Today, literally tens of thousands of Calgarians religiously walking their dog(s), often more than once.  As stated earlier, Calgary is the dog park capital of North American and has the highest dog ownership in Canada. 

This is nothing to sniff at. 

Daily dog walking is one of the best active living habits urban dwellers can have and it is the cheapest one for the City to provide.  A British study published in the BMC Public Health Journal in 2017 showed the dog owners average 22 minutes more walking per day, than those who don’t have a dog. And while the study acknowledged some were just dawdling, many were walking at a pace that provide as much health benefits as running.  

Could it be that dog walking and dog parks, not the mega recreation center make “Calgary, the recreational capital of Canada” or should I say “active living capital of Canada.”  

Walking the dog in one of Calgary’s many dog parks might just be what qualifies Calgary as “the recreation capital of Canada.”

Walking the dog in one of Calgary’s many dog parks might just be what qualifies Calgary as “the recreation capital of Canada.”

Strong Case

I don’t think anyone knows definitively what Canadian city has the best overall recreational facilities and programs, or which city has the most active citizens.  

But I am guessing our old and new multi-purpose, mega recreation, community, leisure centres with their millions of visitors each year place Calgary near the top.  Add in 5,000+ parks, largest urban pathway system, community gardens and a library system that one of the busiest in Canada and Calgary could make a strong case for being “the recreational capital of Canada.”  

In addition, I challenge any major Canadian city to beat the 90+% satisfaction rating Calgarians give their recreation programs and facilities.  Even if I do find the number hard to believe.

It is no wonder Calgary is one of the most livable cities in the world.  

If you like this blog, you will like these links:

Community Gardens: The New Yoga Studio?

Calgary: The dog park capital of North America?

Calgary: Canada’s Bike Friendly City

Calgary: Best Places To Sit